Skip to main content

Full text of "The Billboard 1922-03-18: Vol 34 Iss 11"

See other formats


: 
‘ 
| t 
{ 
‘ 
i 
i 


| 7 
fy 
- 
7 \ 
asl 
LY 
y) 
) 

Y \ Zz " 2, «1 
4 ; | 
4 \ 

; | , 
ty 
+ 


| Price 15 ¢ - | 
8 alia a rr @ i 
| pia.’ 
me 1 “0S > es 
es SPRING EY 
WIG, SPECIAL SE 
Re, We (Wn 
Sle} mee Me 
SCO SE N; The. mn 
(\\ AN is Pour ‘ 
—A 


The Billboard 


¥ 


To 


We, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey, want you all to know that we 
are going to outdo all previous shows for 1922 in our one, big consolida- 


Together forming the Greatest Amusement Enterprise in all the 


the Public and to Circus Men at 


Home and Abroad 


TAKE NOTICE! 


tion which is a combination of 


Ringling Bros. World’s Greatest Shows 


AND THE 


Barnum & Bailey Greatest Show on Earth 


world, and to which is now added: 


1. 


We are abie to do this because we enjoy the patronage of a public with whom we have 
never broken faith, who believe in us and in whom we believe, and between us there 


The greatest trained Wild Animal Shows ever yet seen. The most ferocious 
and supposedly untamable animals made docile and to do man’s bidding, 
showing remarkable results in subjugation and mental development. Big 
wonderful Acts shown in Colossal, Circular, Steel Arenas, fully as large as 
the conventional circus ring. Here the Lions and Tigers are splendid eques- 
trians; and the Leopards, Polar Bears, Pumas, Tigers, Lions, etc., marvelous 
a Jugglers, Long-Distance Leapers and Performers of really merito- 
rious feats. . 


. The biggest Performing-Horse Exhibition ever perfected. Not a half-dozen, 


but more than 200 marvelously-taught horses, the result of the best efforts 
of all the world’s best trainers abroad and at home. 


. A Circus of All-Star Human Wonders, gathered from every quarter of the © 


globe regardless of cost, replete with new, sensational displays and absolutely 
the greatest Arenic Shows the world has ever seen. 


The menagerie is augmented until comparison with other: collections be- 
comes impossible. Here are shown many specimens not contained in any 
other collection on earth. 


Positively 100—not less—100 double-length Railroad Cars required to trans- 
port this marvel of the show world. Wonderful as it may seem, this giant 
show is erected each day. This is made possible because of many innova- 
tions in equipment and management. 


is an understanding that honesty is our policy—past, present and future. 


Opening the season of 1922, with a five weeks’ engagement at Madison Square Garden, N. Y. City, beginning 
Saturday, March 25th, following which this world’s wonder circus will make a complete tour of all the United 
States, so arranged that it may be seen in practically every locality in America. RINGLING BROS. AND BARNUM & BAILEY. 


TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT 


;* 


co | | &@ 
iN 2 | ee 
sae Tl 
; Ss |k 
14 a 
: = 
; : 
7 5 : 
af = + 
i S & 
1 : 
, 5 : 
: & . 
fs ee : 
1 — 4 
: = 7 
: ee |: 
; : 
7, oS po : 
, : 
iy a a 
if : 
i a 
, & a : 
y & o 
, & ee - 
: wi LY 
: : 
re 
| = E 
‘|| : 
: : 
: : 
j ; z a 
= a 
: : 
| F 
S 
7 @ 
: : 
a i) 
a 3 , H 
@ 
: 
yo : - 
ze . 
| H 5. i 
B an 
; Le . 
o 5 
| 7 an , - 
rs 
; 
a r] 
i, § ee : 
ns sane ena H 
mn 
} bd + 
7 OS . 
: | 
fi a © 


MARCH 18, 1922 The Billboard Bs 


Everythin ma» BlOSSOMS "™ Spring 


rLOSSMORE SWEETS 


WILL BLOSSOM FoR You [Vy CONCESSIONAIRE 


WITH THE MOST MARVELOUS LAYOUT OF NOVELTIES EVER BEHELD IN A CANDY PACKAGE 


EVERYTHING NEW 


AND WORTHWHILE IN USEFUL AND SENSIBLE ARTICLES IN EACH AND EVERY PACKAGE 


OH BOY — OH JOY 
Flossmore Sweets 


Just Out—With a Wonderful New Candy—it’s Great—Can’t Be Beat—A Real Treat 


A pg _— —— a We have a big surprise for you 
made from the finest materials. A , . 

Candy that they will eat and enjoy A REAL PACKAGE WITH REAL GOODS which aves GaaD we cony sailing. 
—and come back for more. Will A trial will convince you. 

ery hy. ph A BIGGER, BETTER, GREATER THAN EVER LET'S Go. 


GET OUT OF THE HICK CLASS 
JOIN THE REGULARS IF YOU WANT THE TOP MONEY 
HITCH YOUR WAGON TO THIS SEASON’S BANK ROLL GETTER 


OUR GOODS MUST BE RIGHT 


HAGENBECK- THE JOHN ||” GOLLMAR 
WALLACE SELLS-FLOTO ROBINSON BROS. 
CIRCUS _| CIRCUS _| CIRCUS __| ciRcUS | 
These four famous organizations hit the trail—they take with them FLOSSMORE SWEETS—as an added attraction, 


These Folks Have Investigated and Decided That This Is the Novelty Package For Them 
BECAUSE IT SELLS AND SATISFIES | 


| IT IS THE NIFTIEST CANDY PACKAGE THAT EVER INVADED RAXY MIP WAY OR 
UNDER-CANVAS SHOW ON THE ROAD. It Will Go Across Anywhere or Any Time 


! | GO TO IT—RIGHT NOW-—IMMEDIATE SHIPMENTS—DON’T WRITE, WIRE 
$55.00 PER THOUSAND PACKAGES Free to ‘any Point IN THe UNITED STATES 
250 PACKAGES | 500 PACKAGES | 1,000 PACKAGES | 2,500 PACKAGES | 5,000 PACKAGES 


$13.75 $27.50 $55.00 $137.50 $275.00 


ALL STOCK SHIPPED 250 PACKAGES TO A CARTON. A DEPOSIT OF $10.00 REQUESTED WITH EACH THOUSAND PACKAGES ORDERED. 


THE UNION CONCESSION COMPANY, "harrison" 456 So. State St., — iil. 


7 7 

ta 
i 
: \ 
( ea 

| 

| = 

| h . 
| ih . \ 
| | 

| - 

| im 
| x 7 
Z 
| Wy coal 
| 7 

| : 

| 

| ; 

| 

ee 

: 

| " F 
ee | 
| - 
ee J 
| | ; 
ee | 

| 
OUR CANDY SSA A Ah | Hal OUR BALLYS tt 
a | - 
| 

) q 

| 

. 
ee 

| 
| ¢ 

| ; i : 
| .—lU 
| ‘i 
| 3 : 
| _ 
| _ 
ee a 

| rg 

| ri 

| 
| . 
| . 

| ; 

| ne 

| 

| 

| 

| : 
| 

| | 

| 

1 a _ 
. 
; 

1 

3 ; ; 

: a 


The Billboard 


POEPTTST ES COT ETE EEE 


PAPER HATS -- CONFETTI 
SERPENTINES 


“We Defy Competition” 


MARCH 18, 1922 


Cut out this ad and use it for future reference. 


Belcher at our expense. goon 
Ring 
PUPUETEDEEETELECEEREEDEREEEELEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEDEEREEE EGS EDEL DEERE PEERS CELE PETE T DEES EEE EEE EEE 


= = q 

_ e ntine j packag 0 r — Fez with bl Pri = 

= “Teo ie trnenenenetnecnenese RB eee catcteaenes crestor te 

SS S%p-Inch Tube Confettl, Per 100.......... 1.40} ® ato Tat can also be used tects = » 

ss 8-in, Tube Confetti, Per 00............... 1.90 Paper Hat, round, Is a good seller at Car- = 

= 360-1 Dennison Crepe Paper Hats Combina- MiVAlS OF IVERWARY. ..ccccresccscesccccecs e = 

SS tious. A wonderful asst. of hats. S issue Shakers, larg h k = 

4 cad § a Tis siete $ = eescece - ee : whey ay 8.00 4 - 

gee Tissue Shakers, 10-cent size, pretty colors.. 4.50 = 

= beaut ed Tissue Shakers, 5-cent size, pretty colors... 275 = 

ee Co ays 

= )-2 Dennison Crepe er bina- bis R. W._B. ho: 5.00 = 

ss tion. A pre nC vo 8 differ oon Santer Our PING. rete recereee OE 

= No bands. Price “per “Gross se eeeceeeeeeees 3.50 nat Horn, Regular $4.00 cumber........ 3.00 = 

= $60-3 Combination Paper Hats, 6 differ rent Penny Hom. Imported....cccccccccecceccess w= 

— shapes. made of heavy ctepe tr. Blow Outs, Ticklers..c.ceccessecceccosccess 0 = ide a iamon 
ee oe Fee per “Gress anne Blow Out, large size, regular $5.00 number.. 3.25 5 db 

= 660-4 Comb Her e have an Slippers or Locust Snapper Noise Maker.... 75 = ap ce an 4 every test, these 
a” Ment that eats anything we nf, = 

ae ipo of paver hate Orright colors. Per B08 50 LBs. reese 430 SS ee mt TIFNITE GEMS are so much like 

S trade of creve paper. re rodent Dearratcmonestiamltms yittwid? diamond that even an expert can hardly tell the differ. 
= ee - ll Jose Blowers, small size, improved. "Per on = 1 Almost e ence. Have wonderful pure — = of diamonds 
S the asst posavy Price, oor Geum on voos amceerecess una. °°” Gae ae ms, Cray eustine Of the first water, the dazzling fire, iance, cut and 
= 760-5 . RB. W. B. Crepe Hats, Solid € pas, a i ee = > Tifgite Gem. polish. Stand every diamond test—fire, acid and 
mS  -PMrlotic, asst. GLOSS .....cc.ccccccceeee 3.50] Horn Blow Out Ticklers, Per GrOSS. secures 350 SS @ 312.50: diamond file. To introduce TIFNITE GEMS into 
= = on arrival. eve them lutely f 

= rT . : = ry locality, we will send absolutely free and 
= We have av vid large stock of the items listed above. = si ssc: ontrialfortendays’ wear. Payonly$3.50 onarrival; 
= All orders will be shipped the very same day received. = balance $3.00 a month if satisfactory. 

= Send cash money registered only, or P. O. money order. = Ladies’ ~= Solid Gold TIFNITE 

= 50% cash with order, balance C. O. D. = .. aan GEMS are | How to Order 
= Please write name and address plainly. = mounting. ountings set in solid Cut a strip of heavy paper 
= = — te fs gold her pay yy so aoa exactly 
= = Ti meet when drawn tig y 
: Novelty Favor Works: ee eee | Bere 
= = L a ger on which you want to 
= y = Soaly 5.06 penny ee eee wear the ring. See that the 
= = a ‘resi. day. No reference—no | measuring paper fits snug- 
= MANUFACTURERS OF PAPER NOVELTIES = Halanes obligation. If you can tell a | [y.mithout overlapping and 
= = month, rom a genuine 

= = second joint. Send the 
=9W. 119th STREET - NEW YORK CITY = diamond, or. if for any reason } crip of paper with order 
= = Tooth u do not wish to keep it, return 

= = 

= = 

1 | fr 


y I THE TIFNITE COMPANY 
“Gearenteed 511 S. Plymouth Court Dept.2209 Chicago, DL 
Teuite Send me Ring No......on 10 days’ epgeeval. Regees copay 7a 

——_— tisf ene yt | return a within 10 dave” A expense, 

. a x 
__——- | "in ordering ring, be sure to enclose size as described above, 


=e os oe ee ee ld Address....... PTETTTTT ETT ttt PPePETETOTIT i tttieiiit of 


FOR EVERY CONCEIVABLE PURPOSE 


Fee, erp Sy eed eS Sr ; pi Sea Card Table, Pillow Top, Pennant and Window Trimming Felts. Felts cut to any size or shape. 
—_ EVERY OFFIC E SHOULD BE BHQUIPPED WITH OUR ALL-WOOL cH AIR PAD. 
OUR 4922 PACKAGE GUM 


BRINGS COMFORT AND SAVES YOUR CLOTHES THAT UNSIGHTLY SHINE, Send $1 
with size of chair, and we will mail one chair pad postpaid, 

ROYAL FIVE and PALM BEACH and our HIGH GRADE 

BALL GUM are winners. More than double your money. 


~s CONTINENTAL FELT COMPANY, - 64. 1lthSt, NEW YORK 
UNITED PEPSIN GUM Co. 


“if It's Felt or Made of Felt.” 
263 Washington Ave. NEWARK, N. J. 


SLOT MACHINE OPERATORS 


My Future Play Machines and Route for sale. Four thou- 
sand dollars. All letters answered. 


FOR SALE! R. A. TALBERT, 2605 Belmont St., Fresno, Cal. 


A WELTE WOTAN BAND ORGAN) HARRY FRAZER SHOWS WANTS 


Colored Minstrel Show, two good, lively, snappy small Shows. Concessions: Bal! Game, Shooting ig Br Le og 
in first-class condition; cost new $5,000, but in order to dispose of quickly, will po er tga Cook House, — other legitimate Concessions, Men to help operate Merry- 
sell for under $1,000. Address P. 0. BOX No. 906, Kingston, N. Y a ue wees on hav paaten” eo te 1 


ARRY FRAZER, P. 0. Box 542. Elmer, New Jersey. 


NOZAKI BROS., Inc., ae NEW nl id CHINESE 


prise af Ayrte 


San Francisco 


le pe ean + iS Si Aya PG agement. |e ear" es 
OFFICES: ft wy yp i anil ee igs eR eS oe ite - Decorated Baskets 
ORE tithe Ci ; ee fe PM > te * a . 


IN MAHOGANY COLOR 


Trimmed with Silk Tassels, 
Rings, Beads and Old Coins 


S IN NEST 


ALWAYS CARRY STOCK IN NEW 
YORK AND SAN FRAMCISCO 


Best Quality and Lowest Price on 
Marke! 


Ly deY 
ope. | 
ab 

i 


SIZES: 1245 10x41 614534 %3 622% 


ere TMS TT 


B . ' “4 
= | ee tooo el 
EG IS 18 csc cenienaaiaaiaal 
l Sa a ; 
h : | 2. ZN ? 
= = . : : ' UW * 
a3 = = : 4 % \v : 
| = = La Y SS Se I f f 
= = gf oat = tery, ‘ 
= z v if y | 7 i . 
= = : \ : i A 
A = =| s \ a a a a | 
) | 
; 
sit 
if 
i 
4 
1 | 
i 
aK | . 
1% 
an 
a 
Hs 
i 
#1 
) 
ET NN SS Sa Pe 3 
Sy or 
| " a ROYAL FIVE @aNi7 eo 1 os 
if : €): PEARMINT( >). a 
: BN oe a : Hi 
STICKS mana EEE 
. J id | 
f > 
ar 
+ 
} 
; a 
i j s ” < . * aa ae T #3 Tgatn % aS WK: os es Jae 44 i \e WD Md 
|) Yokohama I 4 tart ONE Gd SOG. REE iF pugh) 3 a ee 
a Oe ut 4 2) eek «, Ae oe ‘ hi a 
Tokyo LO. Oy oT eas 14 SA, 
ee Fe ie a: ; ik i ty Tek, bee) Aa 
| Kobe PR So" ae WE Ow eas Fo L Mig | a 
a? ' Mt, ** fad x *; a } - 7. d PG 4 - . f 
Fem. eo | 5 ie A ee Y @ - g Mg $f aa 
Osaka GAN ie! ieee Bet 
$ PR ttn er ae gy ee en ee 
hanghai | CRM ed wigs vg Ee } katy Oe 5 % &. yo & 3 : & © 
Pee > ae SS apebas te he eon AB oss fs a . ~ iy 
L, 


~ SPRING NUMBER, 1922 


i} 


Entered as second-class mail matter June 4, 1897, at Post Office, Cincinuatl, under act of March 3, 1879. 


ee Coe ee eee a en 


owe 


ee ee eee 


Ro etal Se ee EEE ee sa MG RN OL ee ‘ : 
: OT ae ae eee Cm a OR me ‘ EO as Seba PRE i GOON Ge EES aee SHE Ramenr Pr eganges ee Pe ‘ | 
ay . CL SR Bat a a ta ms MS a ae Z bl re, ve, Rag gee ge Fs A : a * SAAR gi #3 ae ies re Se #s 
7 2 Seah “es ee z piece gg « be ee ee, be 3 % ; eR ai z Fug ; . & 4 ; 
BA ye” i Wa fe eee aoe % 
rs , ae Leis ff: =. ee ae tt 
: ‘ 3 ae : “ te ees He 1 4 ie r ge S : ia ! 
‘ ete ee ae ; : Gee ; a ao . : x om so ot ae i .- 
—— Nie’, ee ba GO at - ~~’ Re ore : ? Ss | 
Fe $ 4 ea — we. eg 4 4 ee ed “ "oat F 
et ae es a + ss -page a bs F é : Z : as ey : Bi 4 } 
we ye ss pare te, . , ee “i ae i) iy, aS He oe } a 
€ me % . — yp Mi om, #8 ; ‘at ; : bi . ee of 2g; 3 - eS #6 “4 ; f 7 : 
eee Be: : : oe! z J — 1 % s 3)? i- ‘ ve eee 3 sas i es. i ; 
‘ os . : 2) é Beck — Miiallgs tage tm he ; <i if 
1 Ee > aa Se: es 
ce ea ae the poata Sw pz ~—~ yh F 
* 4 ¢ Pee é ‘ i ve Tg 0 ey agite nen SS re ¢ k ; 
bros : - “ fF ie BEEP a, mmm erg oS roe ae i ' 
tg” ie es ee ch ee a , &§ 
Feu x . ‘ 2 ang 5 re “ r. > mt i ‘ & Sie eT a : de oe = ms , e a pode ~ ee foe : omg " “ ; ~é or aor r le 5 , a my P ai b aia a 
or - Se ae ae : alienate oe, Ran P ’ = Py, ped % Pe fem a by ee eG se ecilige re di e Kc sa Eircoacge, Ft se, Oe a 7 ; btik tghe 
gk Pe - a ae se fel See oe ee Pe ng SS PLIES, . 
So ‘ - bs 4” é4 Yes ate pee : ete 7 . " — ee Ns ” eae pau tt ge * a ee ~ . 2 ; 3 ee 4 “i Bi ae oe ¢ a a 
bp, i» ets a rare a, Cee Be RN Go Leer | é a pe Oily ols ™ hi a Leo Bee 
be Se ‘i sea, Sg ep sal vw ne a Pg A gs , * Gee ry nae 3 “28 oes $e od es ee ie i. et Re. agate es Me ~ : 
2 te eA = ey inp ts rays & BESS <. aR ial . ies i 3 oe i ua . es ay se ug Sie eee ip dj “- e es aim & 7 e 3 he ; ‘, ae Bs ; 
ine ee ee TO pera et Pee ee.) ne 2 a a 7: 
shite,” ln — ne "set Pea. Sofa : ~ PN ee " ie & i BR ee 7 
4 ¥.. 4 “TS - : Aa. = tA a j ee 45." Qo ead ee BE asa. Se . 
> Se i 7 ae tad) ORE Fos “- ‘ . ha ee ee gO se J A ty : i 
y* 2 j : ; - a gp | . i ‘ Meee <a 2 ‘ a 4 o me . 5 = he ae? AB .  / <s Fong i E : 7 , aa an a E> i : : 2 
4 ie ri i y re Wa rd P 5 a ’ t : Sea fn ‘ ea ‘ a ao, sy 
hl OE ARS alae ai OR. tl Ce PE a Mme ee i e £~ i of 
\e,-. ~ e oe LIFT ak ——— Ae eG eset oF ii ge fo <p e *, f <i ’ 
eee ge | BM “Qhintey  Lg) \" Fd ae ae 
eRe Ti a Ki apt itn FS ty he Coa | Ae —r ay i 
Po ee ay | i ‘ fA Oe . cena EE - #: ‘ & F ee, | kai , a ne — : 
¥ ee ” a7 + > ed ‘ a. ; * ‘ # eS ag = a ys z A is ve rf, oe } } Aue “ “ Bo at * i ; i me % : , 
ae th rade ee ol nae) Md ees Oh? rege) < § eae a “ ; a ) ree ay : 
eg RM cee! } ems 4 % - e Say . ae + te ff iy es —— 3 s al . ; § 
A. Misc eA Mc AY ek, f°) =e — ee » 
P . lby $2. . i a 33 1 a of * =e 2 a 5 #] aay ta eee 3 ‘ kl — = 7 h 
ie. ie. | § y rey ca f¥ ‘od Se f f. er ania Se Ae ay tr (ea Xe ae 3 ; é 
Ua ‘ Bs. ie a F . - 4 nf | = hos y E ays zi od ae “€ " ee eg <BIG .. Ls m4 ete. PY ok ad £ - e 5 - 
ria %. : i ay es & a ae Re hi — % Sg ae SH Fea pe ae © 5 Pic) eg : P 
3. et ' ) aie ar é Se OB RS ee ee EM, Oo y eB eer OO aa - 7 
: i} jag. t ’ : ' & te eee Ain E gee ee . : 
A} : | mae UA he me NiRance ee oe tS ae 
i = a% S a «ay : x AY ; iw if; : a . & : oe ee . t : 
Fag fi Lak see FT in. ri } ted Hn Pe Y Tats ig ee ee ; 6 
SAA. PPS: Bei Wi TAGES. oma f ret F -) bgt eye et SS ge et T <a ary . 
1, TAS c B ¥ E rei f 4 [= de “va i} See, ky * Pe: ‘ gl my < BOXy iS Bae eg eae i } ’ 
ie , we. y* ta ee (\ 2 % htt a # a AS lied Me 
‘ . //\ ye ; ig: - Be. IAF mM © 2. SH ae - lee . re adh ee A : Lie pnt 
{OE P v4 sim 54 ;; + f: Pee P| gaat ss Bas or if % = $ ei } ‘ 
me YA/WAY ad a r e 3 tat Be \ A eg ey Pe Pat te. a 5 cag salen a ite . Ce de hs = f 
i) ey , AY < ae ; . Es * ~ Sars ie . @ a - a | ‘ i E/ Nee" oe s 
\) pf, ok, , ie: i < ; “ * : ie % a: a 1 PPS = 
Y ee al ann > 3 hy ae. * Yee 4 OE ae PID RG ee DES 
é a -_ —— a pee ei eg Boe x eal “ : . a ss 2 Pa oe aad  n & (; ©. 43 ie AVA 
tee £ ‘ll ‘ ae * Lr aS Mah, E ti > S Re e Kr =: - 
ch 7s BS Pees we UR" ey co Sk. ae re SA cr Pi le if y digs | 
il / : e ‘ ie i ; ig weet 3.73 ‘ = me y oe Puc * a ? atte ‘. ¥ Sd " \y AY , > H 
; a be iy 27 fy HPs, . ‘ : ee ‘ a &- , é feat) RR ee & 4 “1 
; mc Se ES. oo 2 ' a E ‘£3; Py Gee: yee ; a sae 5% , . er ie a? ig x LY vey & 
Wy SP Pe Se Go A Se ees AS ae. ee x: ta 5 VARIN ee ' 
i DA | re 3a & se Ga ar o * ee | iN 
: ‘ Stat @ : a ’ a oa Ee i * &} - = me a 5 mS 
‘ 4 ~ & ‘ a ” ; = ; ss ‘ ae 3 >. ' is Sg 5 
#3 ts ~ yeh. r. *.: % . 4 ee ‘ VES ae i ¥ Ss i a 4 fi i aa 
feo itittwes. go «ees IN | 
72 i ON Le in ommemee Sei G YW 
; e a Wetec... RS ho ae eo . See 2 ee EF es ve “a nl hes ’ 
| Rts fa a Cer : © mas & a eee FR ae 
. sf Y .> me << = P t : B . as 5 aS . mK Seek ee ed - . ay hes ; ney : 
Ny aia eee we p>, Se" ee ‘a ¥ ~ age ae OR «=| ONT TB | 
i. OF te ta. a 2 ia® f ee wm, Be Bisa so = nao -* , ™Y be | + \ Ht 
yrs i Fi Al ae in ft Nee Tae sy % pl ‘ — = ° . ” “3 fs 3 & a ai } ™ a ‘y . 
SS ’ “Oye 4 7 haere wba, ‘ a Mowe = Nyt ’ Tie ‘<a SS ee ieee 1 En Qe _ 
rakes Se Pt ae i eternity eS . i... . BRR ee i Ae 
y qs : % os , 1 =e a | * ae We pe ee. ly ‘ ee ok ; Tai h | 
* Ro RR a. eee a eee a I N 
* : , < - ao sat ~ f & we aad 3 . 4 a ¥ & . © af, 
, ‘ we ‘ ep er - as ‘ aa eS ; Rt “73 r ny ee SZ glee te by iho 
ef — - - sre at 2 ‘ BP ote. ei ; . See eee ote 
4 - ef J iy ro ee DAs hw oe. a Meer | 
. * : ne R * — > : 
ee | “ie waite, Bed : $/ a Eee iy a ie ar it 
r a - her - ks ae a. oO, Wes Ce ae 1 ey t ier sg Nd. id i . - 
ae if i MifegD g eee: reerr ' ! aes by why yes wm <™ i ! wag . . a | e i ’ yg 
* gl lalla ET ST NRE, y ~  . a 4 5 yo tes § 
‘ = es ‘ vs ; : : ae 48 & : 8 wees S ie a c< oh > : €..4 ‘ ; f° 26 es, aes <o ag ae 
i oo eee * Pore hae pe rr Se Tt > Sie 4 tas “\ \ ’ gi oa i ge. es i 
“ * , Bae = ; Pe ot) eh « i : Y) ha ss — 8 " ‘ >} a ste “ os . Ss : ae aa * , 9 £ pe 
> See: capt % my a , J att *. , ee $ \ “ .§ SESy 1. a ) . ; f ils ‘ ag + . ate yy «4 "S4 WG Z & 
ie Ba ees were” SS) a oe ne ont thot : 
Fe af a ined , | he > mL py Ee Se oa : ee ee ee r 1 
"| eae eae ake Sy! OBS haere oe GOS) i ee 7 
be “he ad é . raat ? oe ee a ray * ya. BAe Bes fad Wk. ae ’ es 
; Bay ny eee et ae 2% hs + Spas op Sees.“ [RO <a aie = “ie , ‘. = j 
ak a So NS se. ak Oe rei iS Ss Pages™ f oa 
eee we Ei Ay ee im aie | aie , 
* i i, a et Se ae as > e ¢ * ak & ‘we FS ih Se sh 7 . — ; ; mae ot RS ~ NO bi a 
bg AY ows ~~ . “= e S ty ‘a ¥ * ” + = 4 “ges. rs 2 ot _ - 2 my 4 “ee = a Sa te e 
ASPERGER) Py tn Si 
; oat a. > —f. , wae’ a ab Se A — Se Me See any Se 
—— ee Siew eee ‘ Péxi¢ H : oe ee ee. SS. s —— ex Meiice.. 2 eee. oe <a 2 > ie re ~ 7S : 
ee eC Se ee ‘ “ 
ee 5 
a! 
I f s / 
a 


aioe Ae alpine ita ay 


4 


ee aa em 
SAT ee a ERR PRT 


ee a te ie i to eee eee ~s 


cat at 
Rs a 


he GB PoOoOaArFC 


MARCH 18, 1922 


Tre Gum 


in, ATMMISEMENTS — 


COLORED man who had long been 


With a big circus as porter on a 
private car, but who had started 
his circus career as a musician in the 
Negro side-show band, was asked why he pre- 


ferred to be a porter rather than 
“The last season I 


a musician. 
played in the band,” said 
he, “I was its leader. and altho in that season I 
had all the leading business I wanted I would 
not return under another director, so I decided to 
take the porter job which was open to me, You 
see this is the way it happened: 

“At the close of a season the man who had 
been our band leader for quite a number of years 
left us, and the side-show manager decided to 
keep the same colored boys together as his hand 
for the next yvear. So he hired them individually. 
On the day we opened our season we were ad- 
vieed that the colored musicians should select 
their leader from among their own members. 
That was the turning point in my career and put 
me out of the music business forever. You see 
every one of those from: the Eb clarinet 
player to the bass drummer, was a candidate for 
leadership, and the result of each of the first 99 
ballots cast was one vote for each member. It 
Was necessary at last for the side-show manager 
to make a selection, and, because of the longest 
period of service, I was the lucky man. So for 
six unhappy months I was leader of that band, and 
you may believe me when T tell you those de- 
feated leaders crowded my busy hours with more 
worries than one colored man could stand. In 
those six months I got all the ‘leading’ TI wanted 
for a lifetime and more than one man’s life- 
share of sour music. No—no more colored band 
for me! I guess I am like all the rest of them— 
Wwe each want to be the leader!” 

The writer has during his experience of many 
years in the show business—forty, to be exact— 
noticed a very marked tendency on the part of 
every circus man to be “the leader.” Commenc- 
ing with the contracting agent, who is the first 
man to visit a show stand, and including press 
agent, advertiser, department boss, staff official, 
superintendent, bareback rider, trapezist (and 
not forgetting the proprietor by any means’), 
each knows just exactly how to use the personal 
pronoun—first person, singular. 

We showfolks, all of us, like an audience. I 
think you will agree with me that a good big 
turnaway audience is inspiring in many ways. 
And, as our activities are carried on before an 
audience, from the moment the first man rolls out 
of his sleeper in the morning, and before the first 
wagon has been lowered from the cars to the 
pavement, until the last wagon has been loaded 
at night, the circus man has his audience, little 
or big. Sometimes he is pestered by his ob- 
servers. Perhaps they crowd in upon him as he 
hurries back and forth during the busy hours of 
morning when every moment counts, but always 
he is conscious of them, and in a personal way 
he is apt to “play to them” just a little and some- 
times more. But. always and everywhere, the 
showman, no matter what his part may be, is 
impressed with the all-importance of his own 
part and feels that, unless his work is completed 
by “opening time,” the day's business can not be 
carried on. 

It is just this spirit of all-importance that pos- 
sesses each and every real circus man that makes 
possible the one-day stands and two performances 
a day, rain or shine, of the big American circus. 


bovs, 


T IS not the writer’s intention to enlarge upon 
the splendid system that-makes possible the 
Foreign 


handling of a hig, modern circus. 


Theyre on their way 


By Chasiles Ringling 


army representatives, as well as distinguished 
American soldiers, have studied the operations 
of the big show and expressed surprise and ad- 
miration at the efficiency demonstrated in its 
handling, and have been especially impressed with 
the spirit with which the work is accomplished. 

Not only is the circus man a “leader” in his 
work, but he is a very jealous leader. He always 
assumes that he is absolutely the ableet man in 
his particular line, and so he sets himself a stand- 
ard that makes him hustle to live up to. If he is 
an advertising agent he must get the best location 
in the city and one that the agent of the opposi- 
tion show could not possibly land, or, if he is a 


Charles Ringling, of the world-renowned Ring- 
ling Brothers 


contracting agent, he must get the show grounds 
the other show’s agent could not possibly secure 
—the lot, you know, right in the center of Round- 
town—exact center of population, with four 
double-track street car lines running past the 
front, a good pavement from the railway yards 
and only a half-mile haul! 

And when the show begins there is where you 
begin to see the many champions of champions 
and leaders of leaders. 

“Did you see that what-you-call-‘em-stunt I 
performed this afternoon? Never been done by 
any other performer, John Doe tried it once with 
the so-and-so show, broke his ankle and had to 
quit the business!” etc., etc. So the circus man sets 
himself a standard of highest possible attainment 
in his line and strives ever after to live up to it. 
That, too, is because he always hag an audience. 


Ng what should be the showman’s 
toward the audience? 


The circus proprietor, more than any em- 
ployee, should remember his obligations toward 
the public. In this day and age, whether he plays 
the’ little villages or our metropolitan cities, he 
will do well to forget that old “rube” stuff 
and the “guys” and set himself a standard 
to live up to at least as ambitious ag that of 
his acrobats. 

It is a deplorable fact that some of the smaller 
circuses still run “graft” in all its forms, from a 
“kootch” show for men only—behind a red cur- 
tain in the side-show—up to the strongest game 


attitude 


that the local officers will stand for. One 
would think that the petty annoyances 
imposed on the public by these shows, as, 
for instance, the “hold-out,” “walk-away" 
and “short-change” gags, would be enough to make 
return engagements impossible, let along the strong 
games that are still carried by some circuses that 
should be able to exist on the legitimate proceeds of 
their admissions. These fellows, who might, if hon- 
est, attain to high standards, have never learned that 
honesty is just as essential in the circus business 
as it is in any other field of endeavor. It would 
be well for them to play to the audience in the 
sense of wanting to be regarded ag on the square 
and clean in the conduct of their affairs. If it is 
worth while to play to the outside audience, while 
strutting about the lot in the morning to make 
the front of being a real personal wonder, it surely 
is worth while to play to the auditors inside who 
have paid their honest money in the expectation of 
seeing an honest show and who expect to receive 
their honest change when they trustingly hand in 
their money, willing to pay the advertised price of 
admission. 


No circus is worthy to survive from vear to 
year that thrusts under the public’s nose crooked 
games of chance which some shows stil! persist 
in running as important revenue producers. Big 
or permanent success cannot come to shows of 
this class, and it is ‘high time that al! honest 
showmen should make a concerted effort to elimi- 
nate these abuses that in a measure discredit 
the whole amusement business. 


N” SO long ago the writer was approached by 
a circus proprietor who suggested that the 

writer, with his co-partners, take several 
small shows and put them together and make a 
big show of them that might rival the biggest. 
It takes something besides many wagons, cars, 
horses, animals, tents and performers to make a 
big show that will command the attention of the 
American public. It takes sincerity of purpose 
above all, and—remembering the audience you 
are always playing to—it takes an audience. The 
real big audience can not be created unless the 
show is conducted in an honest manner. 


Recently a company of showmen gent out its 
agents, spreading the report that their proprietors 
were soon to purchase a certain big circus. Of 
course they had never approached the proprietors 
of the big show with such a proposition, for too 
well they knew, even if the show were for sale, 
its owners, who had built it in strict accordance 
with the highest business principles, would not 
peddle it to them, and another very important 
reason they did not make such a proposition to 
buy was that they did not have the price. 

There is just one way to acquire a big show 
with a big reputation and that {s to build the big 
show and at the same time build the big audience 
necessary to support it by keeping faith with that 
audience, 

After all the audience is the important factor. 
Our American audiences are very friendly, and 
when occasion demands very lenient, too, but 
our public wants to know it is not being gouged 
or swindled, let alone sandbagged. 

It is gratifying to note that the percentage 
of grafting shows is today small, and growing 
still smaller, and let us hope that the near futur® 
will see only legitimately conducted circuses and 
that the public, that great, big, good-natured 
American audience, will have the added pleasur® 
of feeling well and honestly treated when it 
spends its money to see any American circus. 


A trio at work 


@@ 


Se ee ST ae ae = eaee 4 
—C~« , ——— 7 
; ; 4 
re 
ee a : 
ee 
; 
‘4 
ti 
i 
Ht 
if = F 
ie £ = a 
it! F . | 
Wi i} 48 “ae 4 
{ j= a? ‘ ee e 
; eal : 3 we tee “ 3 , + 
: Ps ae ag = * 
Hi ' Eee ee 
4) } " as 
| | - 
a 
3 : 
} _ . . 
; ' - i ‘ 
rN al 
| eo 
; " wt i 
P DY | 
. ‘ ll 5 
Fd ee 
* 
, 
ihr? 
+ al 
| 
| 
, ye 
= a * - - we Me oe / ‘ 
le a 7 4 
" ' Ohh j 4 & , Py, 7 or owe tt: 
; By ag ag Tap 4 7 * 2.5 ae 
OR A or | 
' eas. at gga ne Pir s 9 - in ® : vey = “ 
: | - ey, ee oe ‘ “hie si, - . Y er a , fe, “ ' : : + oR RS 
Pe a 
| 
| \ 
‘ 
P ~ 2 = e = ‘ | | 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


Tine Comsmny lites 


BR 


‘: ee 
HESE 


Tle kar 


the New York State Fair, at 
Syracuse, ig one of the striking 
and unique experiments toward the 
establishment—or at least toward the encourage- 


T HE “Little Country Theater” of 


ment— 
perhaps, of a drama broadly based on American 
life. 

In 1919 the New York State Fair Commission— 
the movement sponsored by Commissioner Charles 
S. Wilson—invited the Cornell Dramatie Club un- 
der its director (the writer of this article) to 
conduct a theater at the State Fair 
to encourage the wider use of high- 
crade plays for amusement, educa- 


of a home-grown community theater, and, 


Be Prof A MDrusmond 


Fair Theater gives, the following additional 
stimuli are already effectively working in New 
York: Two pamphlets for Statewide dis- 
tribution—one on The Country Theater, the 


second an extensive list of Plays for the Coun- 
try Theater, to be followed by a third on Produc- 
ing Plays; an ample and growing package Ibrary 
system of plays and books for inspection; a prize 


tion and “sociability’’ in the vil- 
lages and rural communities of the 
State. From the first it was a suc- 
cess. The 1919 venture played to 
6,000 people and turned more 
away: in 1920, with more plays and 
players, the audiences totaled 12,- 
000, half as many could not find 
standing room; 8,000 pieces of lit- 
erature were given out at the ex- 
hibit; in 1921, with enlarged audi- 
torium and troupe, audiences were 
with 7,000 attending the 
noon “movie,” and several thousand 
turned away—the week's work in- 
cluding forty-three performances 
in the five and one-half days’ play- 
ing, from a repertory of five one- 
act plays y 

Unquestionably one of the fea- 
tures of the fair, and a striking 
proof of the need of more such 
“educational” features, or untainted 
entertainments, the wide publicity 
this adventure in dramatics has re- 
ceived has doubtless been due 
more to the widespread interest in 


16,000, 


the idea 


Margaret Scott Oliver’s “The 
Striker,” Tcheckoft’s “The Boor,” 
Lord Dunsany’s “‘A Night at an Inn.” 

The success of these plays and 
the number of inquiries about them by com- 
munities planning to play them shows that good 
Plays appeal if one only has the courage to try 
them. Next September's repertory will include, it 
is hoped, some of the original plays written espe- 
cially for the country theater, and the continuance 
of the New York State Fair Commission Prize 
will insure eventually a body of increasingly good 
plays dealing with country lMfe, 
viewed first hand and with sympa- 
thy. Surely no better grounding 


than to any startling 
quality of the New York experi- 
ment 

Briefly, the general idea is this: 

Given a bare wing of an old 
fair building not unlike the average barn, show 
that easy but discriminating decoration will trans- 
form this into a satisfactory theater: given a 
bare stage, show that carefully planned “home 
talent’ work can easily construct adequate pro- 
ducing facilities; given untrained but interested 
amateurs, show that working intelligently they 
can adequately present good plays; given this in- 
experienced medium, demonstrate that good plays 
are more easily done and are more enjoyed than 
poor ones; by short talks indicate the scope of 
the project; thru the exhibit reach those who are 
interested enough to ask questions, study pic- 
tures, take away lists of plays, learn something 
about the many helps ready to the hand of be- 
ginning directors; stir interest: follow up with 
vigorous extension service from the State College, 
and the movement grows space. 

In addition to the advertisement of the 
“Country Theater Movement” which the State 


After the play 


competition for original country life plays open to 
all residents of the State not professional writers 
(some of the best of these will be published for 
Statewide distribution); a service to answer in- 
quiries, etc.; a beginning organization of student 
directors to go out to nearby centers to help in 
directing plays; an expected arrangement to con- 
duct “schools” for rural leaders in the county or- 
ganizations of the State; a propaganda to en- 
courage county fairs to establish their own county 
theaters—the Cortland and Batavia fairs had very 
successful theaters in 1921, etc. The present or- 
ganization cannot keep up with the growth of the 
demand for help that has been created. 

Among the plays that have been most suc- 
cessful at the fair are: Zona Gale's “Neighbors,” 
Alice Brown's “Joint Owners in Spain,’ Lady 
Gregory’s “The Pot of Broth,” Harold Brighouse’s 
“Lonesomelike,” Richard Harding Davis’ ‘The 
Zone Police,” George Paston's “Feed the Brute,” 


for the possible “American drama” 
can be expected. Subsequent years 
as the county fair theaters develop 
county prize winning plays and 
troupes of actors will be coming 
up to compete for the State prize— 
a model community building to 
house the “theater” will be built; a 
“school” or series of conferences 
and demonstrations for leaders in 
community drama will be held dur- 
ing Fair Week, ete.—there are still 
dreams to be dreamed, 


So, not forgetting that North 
Dakota, North Carolina, Utah, 
Towa, West Virginia have done 


notable work in this fleld, and*that, 
even where most is done, the work 
is but beginning, the possibilities 
of creating a countryside theater— 
with schools, churches, granges, 
clubs co-operating—with county 
fairs centers of acting, with every 
group of neighboring communities 
organizing their little theatrical 
“circuit,” with improving taste de- 
manding the best of plays, with 
more and more plays “springing 
from the soil,” with all the educa- 
tional and socializing benefits that 
are already being realized—New 
York State and its State Fair Com- 
mission and its State College of Agriculture have 
taken a constructive lead in which they may well 
take pride. 

Above are the substantial facts, Perhaps the 
atmosphere of the experiment is still hest de- 
scribed in the words of an article from The 
English Journal: 


or ‘Little Country Theater’ at the New York 
State Fair wags undertaken by the Cornell 

University Dramatic Club as an experimen- 
tal demonstration to stimulate the use of plays 
in country communities—by granges, churches, 
schools, country improvement organizations—as 
a means of recreation, education, culture and 
‘getting together.’ . 

“The venture wags planned to show how com- 
paratively easily good, rather than poor, plays 
could be presented; how artistic simple staging 

(Continned on page 254) 


Standing room only during “The Pot of Broth” 


Final scene in Zona Gale’s “Neighbors” 


. 


ee ne ene eee 


ry | | 
-_ ‘fs 
| 
a i 
3 s "i 
$ ig a “a 
fo 
. : 
a : 
4 . 
Hy 
gs 
ee | 
f hs 
ee 
; 
es “Ss aie ‘ 7 ye 
Po tape % he . . 
af. ae fe ~~ — if an 
; 3 7% , i met Mia a a. . PA SE RR: 0 lg 
Bein sa i el Pb Be ‘je e a = 
sail 64 he “i — te ke eee | ee 2 ie a ae 
wa tet ee Fs - ae ot Se eS te ee ee cS OR Rs: Meee meee bas i 
a. ee . ee . Bee x i = oe ? * tri saas Hn, ee Fe 4 . Pg Bae 
yn SB ay r noe a Fe : Cee ee sh Pin ee eee pike ee se See be ree 
as Viol Ap . S. : '~ Be: if tae Be oo eg Ae TO ae has 
me 2 oad iF i . , : ‘g « ert ry ee. es. Y ‘ yee perenne wee ‘ 
“me, _ Se ‘ ye we.’ a peed poor . 

3 % » a ” Pee Se os ee ‘ : 
~~ i a : a” ee Pa a | Saas ppg nies me 
be. Bt ¥ : ee s & 4 ~ poo a a ane * iby 

. y = be : a oe : Ss ee - pa 7 
7 & o = % as Se ” ei = . —_—* ~ Cm, 
Ba 4 , 32 ee x Ger) 
Joe “POS 3! SR Sees 
hi i of me 
ee ca \e cama i. 
MS | 2 ae \  g®: ; a1 toe 
> Pee _ ae ; \ eet. a+ 
~ 9 ot ae ae = oe = AN, - Pes, 
nn A one: Mee f \ + aie 
eee Sore mee ee 20 4 : ae eee ’ 
me > Gots WR oF Fi a a ° Rye 
: by Ae cae ar oe = 2 3 ed eco - eee : 
‘eae 6 #33 ee aR: f “ee ie ; ee 
ae j i, 
a : 
me 
} 
k 
: 
at 
il 
2 
7 
- 
és f 
- = MI XN ~~ * - 
ces > hk SS 7 ’ ; 
; ieee ieee : » Sant ie t ee 
hc eww yo Bae RS 
“mp es eg. tee 
Bt og as ; : Shere WP Ta aga 2", i Pes, ae ¥ Oe. a 
. whee ; : : . - Se to ace : eh: pee ae pie cm 
* A 2 PRE it eater hj 
Sie he © Gee 3S Ai ook aan apenas ete ee Oo 
y bad seagaare | : ¢ Pe ON Oras ae 
~ A, Gakay RPE amet” fai Ss ee Re a i 
j 3 = sf é : a Ss ; y Sar eS I ee ee “ oe Po as as a 4 <a ae ee t ; ¢ ; 
i ; pt  ¥ vi ee : — ee a ie PD Ak hay eee ee lee : 
a = ; Sie q Ret Shah e beak ee we x ~~ ot oe ee at Oe = vo ae 
4 a a 4 3 SS re ee pk Se eee LY 2 are Titties. see, bi ee 
; #2 S ia aneEe aa ied A, | Perak WB So a cg ORS .° bole OO ee 
: Je, : is Le Pi ae ee Bae SS : See ¥ Se + J Oe j 
“°F nn a Bs & * ae. oc oe ~ .. ¥ PR ‘4 ane ee i : thee : ; ¥ . * xs gas 2a ia : 
as : ae : - 4 Ne ; -& Phos. & id : al bz $s as cS & P wa See pe x ; r % Co |, Gam eae ee a 3 -! 
‘ Po. é . ahs &, - 4 < * m ~ a { Me me ra v. * ¢ l S te , a3 aa ¥. . s + cuit, ee i i oe Sg t , 
Sarr ee oa ae | _ eel & i Ba ee be eee ; 
Pes -@ ® a > : ~ Hg ee oe “7a ee so oy 3 riiiaiahc tg 7 a <6 ree eae: E : e i ce 
of alate % ann « e " : wr! lS BEAR eg! 7 - % te a CR re ie See. 8 é 
ft ee oh — ” * be as e° KY —. 2 sag SS pe a Be PF lg Ager ea Lo. x a 
LF rae “aN ; r Ta eae d need: | ~ on0s P wi we: — == ge. Rae We sae I aR 
n gs be ait * , >= Pi ni a a : ke “yy > > +, de aes we oR GES. fe F 
X & i es a ay % Es hi Be a, ee eS Re rv. - . Beis ‘ : oid Se 4 F 
. Red att be we ® Way xo : ra * 
a gh ©, aay Fea x Ee * ae ee >is Le ncanahetiateiieenhoeeatannaaeee SRG IRON SSE Sree Sar MORE INR RRR RIA Fe ce 
“ ; “iy, F + 4 Ne . BS nel ee ae 4 ens Sy ahs & . ay 
; A ES nd . oa aa a us Sea 4 : F } ie : Aer ¥ i 
‘a mais ¥ '< Ba a BR SS rae on ; 1a et Ra ee Bog 25 a OI em i ge fg hae ae : 
a A “se, ! See se. ee CERT oi MRE eT ae SR 
me ee Ly a er. - Sa oS Be ee ERS Sass x6) : 2 a a BoD RS a See RE RRS oe ea eS en | : 
» = < oe & at ; we ace eS P oe _ Ss “ Sh. “ oo 4 RS ae % | 3 ks Pte hak See oe SO Sk SS = Fs ‘3 ce e = oe & e ee & and 3 i * ae : 
: * : i tam. eS aa SEN on ey Se 2 3 $ x i Ra * y si i 
a _______—_ ———— 
. t 7 
- : °° 
f \ 
ant Lia 


“ate 


~ 


a ia ie i. at 


oo Rane 


POS ye eri 
+e ee 


et oie 


lbw ee 


os 


tO ge ere. 


« 

3 

5 

: 
| 
| 
| 
7 
; 


a 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


ca eae so omg acer aad Ne 


A Fas ONC TIONT 


a 


PROMERLY? 


| 


EVELOPMENT of annual fairs in different 
countries is never exactly identical. Neither 


is their character nor their aims and in- 
fluence. Local circumstances must largely de- 
cide wh: course their development must take. 


But the fairs of America 


becomin y ag 
and incidentally failing in their duty toward in- 


admitted, are 


too iargeiy agrit 


at 
all this 


i 
dustrial or other productive or cultural forces 
not directly indigenous to the soil? 

Recently the writer had a discussion along 


this line with a man connected with American 
fairs who also enjoys a somewhat extensive knowl- 
edge of their European counterparts, who con- 
tended that the fairs of America are not func- 
tioning properly and are not quite fulfilling their 
mission of stimulating to the extent possible all 
branches of national He argued that their 
future development must be along dualistic lines, 
the cultures and industries, and the arts and 
crafts, as defined from the purely agricultural. 
At present they harbor too little of the industrial 
and throw almost their entire resources into the 
effort to better farm life and rural conditions to 
the neglect of very important urban interests, he 
claimed. 

“We sound too loudly the rural note and ap- 
peal, and one result is that, tho the leading insti- 
tutions are located in large cities, they largely 
depend for patronage on people from outside 
their own immediate community. If we will but 
broaden our outlook and provide a greater di- 
versity of display and appeal the attendance will 
show the effect. If our fairs can be the golden 
key to agricultural welfare they are conceded to 
be, they should also be made to more fully reflect 
other activities and to Mirror the progress in, and 
to exploit and help bring to a higher level, other 
arts and industries,” he declared. 

“We get a comparatively insignificant patron- 
age from otr cities, and what we do get in urban 
population comes largely with a mind strongly 
inclined to revelry. Fairs today are an attraction 
to the city man because of their festivities, and 
it remains a question whether the conclusion of 
new and lasting business relations get a good 
chance. I Yrealize that this question of amuse- 
ments is a rather one to discuss with a 
fair man, bu us will admit among our- 
selves that, from the thoughtful city man’s stand- 
point, there is too much of the jazz and too lit- 
tle business in the average fair. 

“Amusements are essential. Our fairs could 
not live without them, but business considerations 
should be first in these gatherings. In the ideal 
fair not only the direct buying public attends, but 
the middleman and connections are made 
between the producer and the intermediaries that 
earry his product to the public, The public comes, 
looks everything over, feels, drinks or eats the 
samples and learns the progress and variations 
of the different articles. The real foundation 
hould be the industrial synthesis if fairs are to 
e the broad economic factors they are designed 
o be. They have about reached the height of 
their development cultural 


lif. 
i17e. 


delicate 


most of 


also, 


ot 


lines ana 


must interests to round out 
and bring a proper balance, as in the case of the 
leading European or the occasional world’s fairs 
on this cont which are a more business-like 
manifestation, with, as the most important 
exigency. the quality of the exhibits, as well as 
the visitors. One goes ith the other, and it 
should be a not ipossible task to demonstrate 
to the manufacturer that in our annual fairs, 
while entertainment and novelties will continue 


to be most largely sought after, a 
visitors will 


very large 


percentage of attend for information 


and enlightenment along industrial as well as 
farm lines. Primarily, agriculture must continue 
to dominate, but our fairs must become more 
general in character and perhaps a little more 


serious, with a stronger leaning 


tural. If there is any lack 


towards the cul- 


of appreciation on the 


part of the yrban public, or the manufacturer, 
the apathy is probably due to the underestimation 
of the fairs’ advertising, merchandising or edu- 
cational’ potentialities ising from the fact that 


in the great bulk of « these 
factors are altogether overshadowed by the man- 
ner in which the purely agricultural or recrea- 
tional are stressed ‘4 

An advertising campaign among manufactur- 
ers was one of the remedies sueirested. That the 
merchant or manufacturer is not awake to the ad- 
vertising advantages of fairs he attributed not to 


ir fair propaganda 


and overemphasized. 


By John 6. Kent 


a lack of business acumen on the part of the 
producer or middleman, but to the men and 
methods behind the fairs. Manufacturers as a 
class greatly underestimate their effectiveness 
as an advertising medium. Few really regard 
them as advertising mediums at all; and yet they 
offer the advantages of all media. Large news- 
paper associations, individually and collectively, 
he went on to point out, carry on a persistent 
campaign to convince the advertiser of the value 
of their medium as a sales force. Advertising 
agencies follow the same course. The fair man, 
if ever he does ¢anvass the merchant or manu- 
facturer for patronage in the way of exhibit space, 
approaches the subject with an apologetic man- 
ner and diffident air—and fails to convince. 
What more could a manufacturer ask for than 
that thousands should pay admission to see his 
product demonstrated in a way that will sell it 
to the consumer where the written page would 
leave him cold? Yet how few take advantage of 


this annual opportunity to do intensive sales pro- 
When they do, in too many cases 


motion work, 


John G. Kent, 

Managing Director Canadian National FE xhibition 
and President American Association of 
Fairs and Exhibitions 

’ 


they arrange their booths in a perfunctory man- 
ner, With a junior in charge who has no adequate 
conception of his product or of the most effective 
means of presenting it to the public. In the ijat- 
ter case a little bold advice on the part of the 
fair man, together with suggestions regarding 
the printed matter to be given out at the booths, 
would go a long way towards strengthening the 
fairs with the industrial 


section of the com- 

munity 
Fairs are among the country’s greatest na- 
tional advertising resources, and, properly har- 


nessed, will pay a large return on the investment 
to the manufacturer with initiative and courage 
to take advantage of their size, their value and 
their usefulness. There is an important place 
for industry at the modern annual fair. 

All of which is given for what it is worth, but 
it closely coincides with Canadian National Exhi- 
bition experience past and present. The 
Fair was started at a time when the 


Toronto 
marvels of 


the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition were sti!] 
fresh in the minds of leading local business men 
who had witnessed the big Quaker City event and 
who, in the promotion of the exposition here, 
were strongly influenced by their Philadelphia 
impressions in deciding the aims and character 
of the institution they were bringing into being. 

An agricultural fair had been in existence 
since 1846, but the promoters of the new fair 
wanted an event with a personal character in 
which the industrial exhibits would receive spe- 
cial care and encouragement. There has never 
been a departure from that policy, and the 
Canadian National Exhibition has had its reward 
in attendance, constant growth in the apprecia- 
tion shown by the public and exhibitors alike, 
and in the broader national service it has been 
privileged to undertake. Receiving only nominal 
government support, it is doubtful whether the 
institution would have survived the first few 
turbulent and trying years had it been modeled 
after the lineg of the agricultural shows of that 
day. Manufacturers and industrial interests were 
stanch friends—they still are!—and perhaps of 
all classes of exhibitors showed the keenest ap- 
preciation of its services. 

It is some years—not excepting the war period 
—since the Canadian National Exhibition was in 
a position to meet all the demands made upon 
it for space, agriculturally or industrially. Two 
years ago the problem of increased accommoda- 
tion could not be longer ignored. The Canadian 
National Exhibition is owned by the city of To- 
ronto, and when new buildings are required a 
money by-law, or ordinance, is put before the 
people to provide the necessary funds. One mil- 
lion dollars was voted for a Live Stock Arena 
promptly. 

Manufacturing interests were critical of the 
exhibition attitude. There was urgent need of 2 
new Machinery Building, and a Pure Food Build- 
ing among others. In view of the post-war finan- 
cial stringency another appeal to the people for 
money was not expedient, but the two industries 
named were insistent upon early consideration of 
their claims to adequate structures where they 
could be properly housed and grouped. 

The problem of financing the buildings with- 
out going to the people was finally solved in 
this manner: The pure food interests were called 
into conference and the suggestion made that if 
they would get a sufficient number of exhibitors 
to contract for space over a period to be named 
at a certain price the building would be assured. 
From .the Canadian National Exhibition stand- 
point the display charge was placed sufficiently 
high to care for all charges, interest and main- 
tenance, and leave available a surplus that will 
go into the sinking fund, which in ten years will 
wipe out the bonds floated for the purpose. The 
proposition was accepted eagerly, anda new type 
of building, containing courts and other unique 
features, is now well under way. It will be over 
200 feet square, built in units to facilitate future 
extensions and additions. 

The prospective Machinery Hall, work on 
which will be started immediately after the 1922 
fair, will contain from 70,000 to 100,000 feet of 
exhibit space, or almost three to four times as 
much as the Pure Food Building. These two 
buildings represent an expenditure of approxi- 
mately $500,000. 

Here is the situation: The million-dollar Live 
Stock Arena will, because of its nature, always 
be a charge upon the city. The reward of the 
community must come from the service it is 
rendering to the rural centers, particularly the 
live stock breeders, This should be a burden of 
government, but Instead is being assumed by the 
city of Toronto. 

The Pure Food and Machinery Buildings will 
perform a vital service to the industries they are 
erected to serve, They will carry themselves fi- 
nancially every year of the fair, and in a decade 
will become a gift to thé city, without a cent of 
cost, a free and yaluable addition to the exhibi- 
tion plant. ; 

As remarked at the beginning, the development 
of fairs In different countries is never identical. 
Local conditions must more or less govern. In 
Canada, at least, the encouragement of the in- 
dustrial exhibitor has been found profitable both 
from the standpoint of service and in the more 
tangible results as measured by the anrual ‘- 
nancial statement, 


&@ 


: ; i) 
‘' , . 7 
; 
: ),  — | 
i: ee 
7 
4 d l 
l ae 
I 
- 
4 
ag 
Pi 
PS 
ee . 
ie 
7 * ‘ 
ih 
it 
ei a Pee RAPE agi: Ayah Bagh Labs, CAL ce i - a —~ 
Bas bhi eta Sas Pee ; i > 
Be Sg ‘ 
ee : ; , cs aaa : 
bake ¥ Coen a Bae ; . 
ee ae hy : 
Sas 
eg E- tuetg: . : 
; 5! “¥ Ss 
3 Be : 3 Fi, : 
é pe va cae” — re * 4 
i a ss ES mae Bia ak 3 ‘3 ? 
_— & - ies = ea 
s 15 ee ; eae Ce 
; ... . eee = : 
,23 es * ee ay 
; ee F oe ;% ; se os ee 
: ” Pe as &, ee . : 
> -. SS . % os S35 eee > 
—_— ie * c.: 
: ‘ Sey eee asia By se 
m* is ai a= 
te Rr 
“Se “ ioe ; ant aes 
\ —_ . 
} " x * ‘ 
a Sat ot Pee! i s 
eee a ES 2 ‘ 
“ - 7 oe a 
eee. : oe . y 
4 HES 7 - 
ie P ee : 
+ aE ok . oo 
ans % b 
x er a > 7 
. ae & 
; i 
r ye: Or Or CO OO Orr Ooo Ol 
Bite? 
i 
eee ne 
PO e—“:sSC‘“‘C (‘QQ 
ere 
: 
‘ 
YP . i . “at 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


of 


naman 


aia 


HAT is the greatest need of the 
W carnivals? This question is 
an all-absorbing one. The 
answer unquestionably is—organize, 
Now, the reader may take fright at this sugges- 
tion, but his mind will change after canvassing 
the situation and analyzing this viewpoint. 

Recently it was announced that Will Hays, the 
man who handled the recent campaign of Presi- 
dent Harding, was to retire from the Cabinet. 
The story also stated that he was to receive a 
salary of $150,000 a year as director for the mov- 
ing picture interests. 

The moving picture interests are much younger 
than the carnival business. Yet, if one suggested 
to carnival men that a general be engaged to 
operate their field and that he be paid such a 
the carnival business would end right 
there—every carnival man-would die on the spot 
from angina pectoris, or heart disease. 

Yet had carnival men organized years ago they 
now could well afford to have a high-salaried 
genius to stand at the helm and guide their ship 
of hope to the port of higher successes. And it 
is even now time for the carnival men to organ- 
ize and make strides ahead. 

Do not let what has been read stagger or stam- 
pede the little carnival man. His interests will 
proiit as well as those of others thru organization. 
The little carnival is as essential to the big car- 
as the army is to the general. From the 
little carnivals come the big men of later days. 
Hence, instead of the little carnival being fright- 
ened he should know it is the interest of his 
bigger brothers to shield and fight for him. His 
aid is essential to the business. 

The carnival knows many that are opposed to 
the business, With all due respect to that ele- 
ment it may be said their antagonigm is based on 
imagination rather than on fact. This antago- 
nism is the result of t2king snap judgment before 
looking into the carnival and knowing its real 
field. Hence, among the richer classes is found 
an army antagonistic to the carnival. 

This army has il» theater parties, charity balls 
and all such things, but it seldom patronizes a 


salary 


Bay Clarence A, Wortham 


carnival. Therefore it is the duty of carnival 


men, collectively, to lay plans for a campaign of 
education, bringing the carnival tn its true light 
before the prejudiced, and then the antagonism 
will cease thru personal observation, and the 


Clarence A. Wortham 


natural conclusion will be that the snap judg- 
ment is wrong and uncalled for. 
The carnival is the poor man’s amusement. 
Therefore, it is highly essential. To the car- 


annual ball in the history of the Showmen’s League of America was held. 
League of America; Charles H. Duffield, president of the Thearle-Duffield Fire 
Clark, Riverside Show Print Company; Oliver Remey, secretary Wisconsin State Fair, Milwaukee; Clarence 
Charles L. Trimble, secretary of Ak-Sar-Ben at Omaha, Neb.; i" 
International Association of Fairs and Expositions; Con T. Kennedy, of Con T. Kennedy Sh 


nival ground the poor man can bring 
his family, meet his friends, be wel- 
comed, and there is no demand on 
him to spend a nickel unless the car- 
nival hag promoted the emotion of desire which 
prompts him to patronize this or that ride, this 
or that show. For a small sum he can entertain 
his family for an evening on less than some of 
the richer element pay for their imousine home 
from the theater. 
’ 
MUSEMENT is the greatest preventive in 
the world for crime. It really is one of the 
greatest gifts to mankind. This was real- 
ized during the war, when the Government called 
in its quota of entertainers for the benefit of-its 
soldiers. The poor man wants his amusement. 
The rich are willing he should have it. The car- 
nival is his boon, therefore, and thru organiza- 
tion carnival men can wage an intelligent cam- 
paign that will strengthen rather than weaken 
the field. + 


There are many ills to which the carnival is 
heir that can be eliminated thru organization. If 
the carnival men think an evil lies in a certain 
place they can, thru organization and fraternal 
effort, stamp out this evil. Hence the worst 
classes of carnivals will not exist, because they 
will find no field in which to work. 

The knocker is one of the worst evils that 
faces the carnival man. He is given too close an 
ear when he speaks. He tells a plausible story to 
one and is taken away by another who is blinded 
for the instant to the fact that such a man may 
give him a temporary advantage, but in time will 
be such a liability that he will sink the ship of 
the auditor. Knockers soon knock themselves, 
and organization will permit the knocker to prove 
that every knock is a boost, but too many knocks 
will boost him out of his job. 


[* SUPPORT of the statement that antagonism 
lies with those who have never seen, let a little 
incident be told. In a Southern city the Mayor 


who never saw a carnival was bitter against the 
(Continued on page 264) 


Bs ¢ bas bat Eo ties ae 


Big Leaguers in Outdoor Showdom 
This remarkable picture of Big Leaguers of Outdoor Amusements was taken at the Sherman House 


in Chicago the afternoon before the most successful 
Reading from left to right are: Ed F. Carruthers, president of the Showmen's 
works Company; Johnny J. Jones, of Johnny J. Jones’ Exposition; Fred 


A. Wortham, owner Clarence A. Wortham Shows; 


William H. Stratton, secretary State Fair of Texas; J. W. Russwurm, at that time president 
ows; Jerry Mugivan, of the Mugivan-Bowers-Ballard circus interests. 


* | | — 
i 
i i ie i 2 
sat _- = 
(4] | | 
4 
my 
a: 
q 
j 
i} 
eee ree a Mate Mee ONE eget LE MEI, 4 a 
ee age g ioe 
: See oe ne 
OM ae ae “3, —— S 
ek: oF ‘ .. : 
Mogens i < , ease ss il Me : 
Ss ee er Spe 4 aaa a 
ey, a a ; 
aii vg ; ge a 
: - 4 ae ee Uh i i GE 4 2 
zg ? E Se ‘> ———aaa i: oe 3 
. 2 te. ye th A 
iy “- 4 “Rigen eyed y es : 
Sais Ie gee eo F 
ape ee se i 
ee g Ps e z HE ee: b P 
. " ee ee eg Bee ; 
eee” Cpe 
pe ch TBS ae 
: Me es ce Dita i 
ag ne ee he im 
Ra Re ee oe i 
Be Sieg eatin e oe a 
a ee hy 
e a ee eS ei : 
Se ee °c een ie ae t 
ne i ¢ : ‘ 
| Rees ata . H ; 
sige Tat : os : 
ioe ak z 
ee Og ; % 
; . 
7 
y 1g 
a | 
BO | 
. i, 
. 4 \ 
* . PR eta aon, om - Qe TMS - ~ . LOU $ Pata oe Set i z <i... 
me, Gets red OE eg : : seer ee ee Se ge wien 
= FS nce Aas ee 3 3 ‘x | os j \ 
‘ : ee ° : ne | " HN : 
er. ‘ ye a ti =: . aa _ 
| Go ee? Sis eee, ° ' . = img 
ace Se seibente e Ay ~ si" “ are ’ 
| - es pate . Pe, [ae 
J . og — ee eS “ % R 
: *. tes . — me ? ., ; . od j ; 
4 eee t PS, * > Pee, P j cies : 
. Z 4 ¢ x yy s i nN Re. ? 2 24 a ae i 
as 4 = « pe cs e LO . me ‘ 
,  § . oe Sg kee - s, > RYE: 
; 7 i © ws * . , : . ce 5 ad : a 4 wail F ety” } } : 
‘ b eS Sa: " : . me 3 at $ a4 » ‘ Be 3 s, - | f 
we . ‘ > Coil a ~ Beds 3 - F Nest _ 3 se 7 4 &£ tp i 
A sage vs a a * fo i ait - 6, 
ot = , 2 hes ? <a 7 3 
cs tr 1 : Be Bath se ae i _ V4 tee F ae 
Neg ar a cs > ee , a ae a? ao oe ; “ 
ay an OV~, Yee ye a 
’ a i, Bs ‘ tes Ss : : ‘ 
ey a 7 PTA ee ¥ ae j a y | va : 
+. ¥ . RSs Ro eae 4 is é 
Pa . : “4 * nA Ro Ss “3 = _ y 
7 ¥ ae 7 oh rs a ‘ 
Ky ae Pa Sees 
oe Se ee : 
Le ee. Bake 3 co a 
4 Se ee es: as : 
Pe FS ipties Oe 
40 Le | ) - Atel 
2k - 5a ees 
Bee - ¢ eta. Pale 
| Ss aa : : ees . Ba Lee eo ee 
: ese z 2g ~ be i, 55 
i See. ire oa Se ace ar : 
e| : : eS ae . 3 cel ap SBR + fr ghee ee 
: A aS Seas 4 , wee ap ON { : 
Pl yn. Soe a She eps: 8 ES oo aes 
| - . “ Se RS f ate ee: ! 
i | - a , a ey a 0S oe 7 
- - a. . -_ . ae Sailers 
? Se . 7 ee a FS i 5 my ¢ 
: es : ‘ fess lk, es 
bs Rees ) x, . f fe : a Re AAS ‘e 
7 SS Woks L ae ; é oe ee te Co sia 
. 7 : gras * Tras > os ates ae ae yay ae : 
Ce ; . X eC ee ohant es ae Se ay me il et he ‘ : 
a . Seemann, — at ee ; , , es : 
% rc can RRRRRN: . : - ies 
| : . $05 9 - 
zz 
re § 7 
, 
a 
‘1! ( : A 
{ , \ 
ii 


‘The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


sasssedhice ; : , sctee 4 ik 
¥ ‘@ = 4 


* 


RRANCIN 


he 


si 


eh 


HERE is little doubt that outdoor en- 
tertainment in the form of clean, 
stirring, amusing, original and pic- 

turesque offerings has become one of the 
most successful features in the public program of 
today. That it has been gaining in importance is 
clearly shown in a glance at the development that 
marks the constant advance and improvement 
from year to year, the gradual elimination of the 
vulgar ard the commonplace, the demands of the 
promoters of fairs, celebrations and civic events, 
the popular taste and the inventive genius of the 
performer. 

It hasn’t been so very long since “get the 
money anyway” was the rule rather than the ex- 
ception. This was a common cause, coming out 
of a growing demand for “something” that would 
entertain, encouraged somewhat by the fact that 
the greater number of 
our novelties came from 
abroad, and performers 
and originators who had 
a different standard than 
the American inclina- 
tions. 

Gradually the process 
of standardization has 
continued until today 
outdoor entertainment 
has its place among the 
highest grade, whole- 
some, amusing and stir- 
ring forms of diversion 
offered the public. It is 
truthfully said that good, 
clean amusement and 
entertainment is as es- 
sential to the morale of 
the people as the air 
they breathe. 


RRANGING a pro- 

gram for outdoor 

entertainment  de- 
mands as much discrimi- 
nation, careful planning 
and balancing of materi- 
al as any theatrical pro- 
ducer or architect or 
civic commission has in 
undertaking. This may 
sound extravagant unti 
we stop to reason it 
out. The promoters of 
the various enterprises, 
fair managers, local com- 
mittees, park directors 
have a general idea of 
what their public would 
enjoy and appreciate 
and how much money is 
available to provide it. 
In the selection of the 
actual material they 
come to the point of con- 
act with the distribu- 
ors, the men and women 


engaged in the profés- 
of securing and 
handling this material 


and offering it far selec- 
tion. In a! this relation- 
ship there must be a 


By 1818. CarMPUtiners 


giving a picturesque, impressive, rhythmic em- 
bodiment of youthful grace and harmony and 
talent. I doubt if there is a stronger attraction 
to everyone, and it serves as a splendid card pre- 
ceding the great night exhibition of pyrotechnics. 

We speak naturally of “fireworks,” possibly 
without thought of the magnificent art and science 
of pyrotechnics, the ingenuity and awe-inspiring 
detail of the brilliant, multi-colored pictures, the 
thrilling bursts of light and sound, wonderful 
transformations, the aerial splendor, becoming 


features and the ah-dh-ah’'s of the grand finale! 
Truly the modern pyrotechnical program is a 
fitting close to the day of sights, music, sensational 


foundation of mutual 
confidence, integrity, 
judgment and the know!l- 


most exciting outdoor features ever created, 
with its riskiness, skillful and rapid action 
and frequently ludicrous mishaps and sit- 
uations. 

LLUSTRATING my point of the success, edify- 
ing character and popularity, of clean, up-to- 
the-minute and first-grade outdoor features, I 

want to mention by name a few acts with which 
it is my pleasure to be associated. What could be 
more interesting and informative, as well as en- 
tertaining to ourselves, our children and our 
neighbors, than to witness the perfect athletics of 
the Bellelair Brothers, known internationally as 
“The Master Athletes of Them All”? They stand 
forth as most remarkable exponents of physical 
culture, give a performance that is a delight and 
succession of astonished admiration, the climax 
the almost incredible and indescribable feat of 
one brother looping the 
loop, flying thru the air 
and being caught hands 
by hands by the other 
brother. Nothing could 
find more favor than 
Fink’s Comedy Mules, 
with ponies, dogs and 
monkeys, to give remark- 
able exhibitions of ani- 
mal training and clever- 
ness, and all together 
combining their talents 
in one of the most gen- 


uinely laughable and 
ingenious performances 
given anywhere. This 


has proven one of the 
biggest drawing cards 
for children and _ the 
grown-ups offered in 
vaudeville or open-air 
entertainment. Who 
would ever believe that 
a woman would rise to 
the heights of fame and 
sensational achievement 
of Ruth Law, the snu- 
preme aviatrix? Noth- 
ing in the history of 
death-defying nerve 
and aceomplishments has 
outshone the feats and 
thrilling evolutions of 
this true “queen of the 
air,”’ yet all accomplished 
by this modest young 
woman from whose book 
many a mighty ace could 
well take a leaf. There 
is a whole volume of 
leadership in acrobatics 
and gymnastics in the 
performance of the Fly- 
ing Codonas, whose trap- 
eze feats have apparently 
set the mark for all! 
others to attain. One of 
the unequaled achieve- 
ments is a triple somer- 
sault caught by the 
hands; not an occasional 
successful effort, but re- 
peated at every perform- 
ance. This is only one 


Upper left: Codona Family. Upper right: Fink's Mules. Left: May Wirth. Center: E. F. Car- 


of a number of equally 
startling and supposedly 


. ° ; . : impossible feats per- 

edge that comes from ruthers, general manager United Fairs Booking Assn. Right: Ruth Law, Bottom: Bellclair Bros. formed by this wonder- 

experience. ful troupe. The equip- 
It has been my good 


fortune to aid in building up a service to the pub- 
lie, the promoters of the seasonal events or regu- 
lar establishments and the performers alike. 
Eternal vigilance is required to develop the all- 
round confidence upon which the success of such 
a service depends. It is a matter of natural prog- 


ress, development, combining the satisfying forces 
of performers, booking representatives and those 
engaged in preparing the programs for their all- 
important clientele, the Public. 

Coupled with the professional entertainment 
is the direct, wholesome and box-office attractive- 
ness of the loca) features, arranged thru the 


guidance and training of experts. I don’t believe 
there is a more really powerful appeal to the av- 
erage gathering than the spectacle or historic 
pageant in which the participants are the children 
and young men end “women of the community, 


acts, tests of speed, physical prowess and rhetor- 
ical effort. 

With the arrival of the automobile and air- 
plane has’ entéred a new and tremendously popu- 
lar form of outdoor entertainment, with its ever- 
advancing degree of sensationalism and amusing 
elements. The racing of horses will never fail to 
attract and thrill. But the automobile race is 
something that brings us all to our toes and holds 
us there until the last moment of the contest or 
exhibition. They are contemplating now in the 
inner circles of motordom a racing vehicle that 
will cover the grounds at the rate of three miles 
a minute! Will it be a sensation and drawing 
card? Ask me. Ask the fair manager. Ask the 
average man or woman. I regard the automobile 
race as a tremendous one-day feature attraction 
at any feir, The sauto-pole game ia one of the 


ment of this act is an 
adornment to any arena or space and invariably 
attracts a great deal of admiring comment. May 
Wirth, the embodiment of grace and recognized 
as the greatest bareback and equestrian star of 
the generation, is to the manner born and has 
broken all records for somersaulting on the back 
of a horse wWile galloping in the ring. This lit- 
tle artist has any number of unequaled achieve- 
ments to her score and has been responsible for 
introducing many unique novelties in this form of 
entertainment, 

And so we could proceed thru a long list of 
original, clever, startling, graceful, clean-cut, 
wholesomely entertaining and amusing acts, fea- 
tures and incidentals of the outdoor entertain- 
ment world. There are many offerings in this 
field that imagine ‘they are qualified but cannot 

(Costinued on page one) 


ae ee are ‘ 
ut gensaae : iin Fi 
Be : : : 
~ . im ¢ | 
: # * Se : esi ate domi RRR oe : % 
Ie 
' 
} 
‘ 
: 
‘ 
A 
af 
Af 
ai 
tt : 
if 
ut Bs 
AG 
a} 
is 
ae oa 
. +e Bes ss ee iS o ‘ x . at at. . Swan 
|< i She ee a Se po ee ee - me eee ee 
13 pone ey Pee eee ee SD ® OG BE 
ii ‘ G » ne ws. 
AP me. Wee ’ San Mt abs 7 * “ a 
; } or ees ee 4 me . 7 
tii) : om 0 ew F 
‘ ~ Ss on 
; Fs F : : 
aot : _— 7 i “es 
oe eat a me 
ip gy 7 ae’ . : aS 
ti | , 4 re. oa a‘ * > 
Tea) bia 8 - va an a. > ~~” “f | « 
| "ew oe Nps 
; 3 7 ot st e r= coe ae 
3 ee ; ce ; | cf A. ie q od 
¢ f16 al 6 F at fae 
: , sO a 4 ? 7 a OR conte 4 5 
| ) mae AW ae 
} ee pie x Se. x sie i ‘ / £ Bid gb 
lS any Megs “ 5 tie OB 
: es OR yg Ny —encoorentereemmmecoraranens =. , - % ae as 
e Pn 44 | Lee et Ee ee —— te 
: oe aeiia ae sca a ae ee % * Sig “ oe % a tees of , Bieta” 
| i + | eee = = ae 
ae : Bd icin om . ee eS ee a, ee . 
Bi ss2/ d oo eee oo al a ll Nie ed 
: ee te 2 out CS A ek ae oe i, B a He 
i oe, eee eg ee te ~ : ‘ . 
’ d \ ae : iy saints: y - a : . / er ¥ Py % 
By . : o Be “9 . - i A 5a’ + i : ks . 
A 4 J : ee 7 . Mee Fee BF, % 
i i oy = ey “he es 72 LA) | eS Ne se 
| Pes ad ‘1 oe = 7 soak ate gg T's 
; ‘2 a aio . Pr PTB. ; i 
Ls ae he og i oe ‘ 
< ~~ ye ee ; me 
i ae if ied ic eee _— Bag 
. | ee a fi. 4 athe. : ae oe ee wi me Ser f 
.\) ee oa) , SAGs ee: eo oe p 
| “ ses 0h ; oe . | 4 % bs “3 
| es @, % e ot ee. 4 | : 7 : ¢ i) ag oe a i 
ae. eR mE Bae oe 
oa z eee aa Pog me 
: ; Be ae z Je a se he te ‘ i i ge ad 
j jd 3 sis a - . ae eS - > ea Og is ei as ce Rhee at 
Che re is Se sae SS OE Fe PO 9» 5 uals ee ae ea A ies ey se ek 
i Te ae ie : (Rbeeg - be ee ite. Ee ae i Pg! 
ee Be wie ee SF Li a Tt ener MI ptt és (i ua ba, ae Me 
ag aie — MED ROO EE LOGE AGAR! SEI ys BOE OS. . b x23 St aebees. 
LS i TT te Eee 
Pee?  ——— Me? ee ie * oe hy \ Bees | 
' go i tee, 5 Ps a a, et Ce a ay 
he eae > * eee by . ER ee as 
, . A | lee ae if i sgl F x Me NE i FF 
. the ae Ee ee ; 3 I i: ha iy 2 SOR 
ca,“ hs ae ~ eae iF Hi iN : =. . : = goes oe eS qi 
: i Pea Be Fo Hi i ~ * “4 ae ay fe, ia 
< ge . aS } : fe Lia a ee 
ta sata she po TS ; ; ff ae TAGE Me Ah Eek 
Bee i 3 rer i i } : RLS OGD” OEY i 
(hg le = os i ‘ ‘ Se 
P foo Ad ~~ te eld evo W ; Sk 
ca. 5 ee — AeA ee se wt Gide % fo OES 3 ae ae 
-- Bee bo ies oa Se ew ate. eee) ee 
er Rati Ge geagnte d ag "eB be , se. eee a as a | Ron 6 See 
ome 3 at OE ed OBE eee Eee ge © | ~ nase °; . Shy Bias) gis ay hee Pi ger 
bes 3 4 “kh gles Fede ila mas tte - x bccn : . os “ye ae BS ik ee 
1 q Pes We Vip 6 ban cE set EL Gp - “ test es ; eh Ae ge ' kee ane 
Si CEL GALES OR LENE E IE ery, . ee ee eR Ee 
| PO LOO ag 6 MOE Da TESTE LEE LILIES LE PEELS LILO PT DESEO 
- a to] ee 
a 
: | 
i ee 
‘ ° 
t ¢ 
_ J ~ Tri ii 
| | , ' ' 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


Toe Cases 


ITH admittedly the largest amusement- 
loving population of any city in the 
West, blessed with an ideal climate for 

outdoor recreations and endowed with greater 
wealth than any other metropolitan community 
on the Pacific Coaert, San Francisco until very 
recently held the unenviable distinction of being 
one of the few cities of the United States without 
a single outdoor amusement park. 

True, there have been such resorts in Oak- 
land and Alameda, just over the bay ‘from San 
Francisco, for many years. These have been patron- 
ized largely by San Franciscans, In fact, without 
drawing upon San . 
Francisco for their 
patronage they 
could not have ex- 
isted. Golden Gate 
Park, the city’s 
great playground, 
and the Ocean 
Beach have until 
very recently been 
the only places for 
those desiring out- 
door recreation to 
go, and the count- 
less thousands who em Se 
have made it a x ‘a TaN 
practice to visit Ai ij; 
these have been d 
afforded no other 
amusements than 
nature provides. 

A stock joke in 
San Francisco is 
the “pass” to Gold- 
en Gate Park, 
which has ap- 
peared in many 
forms and has 
caused much mer- 


BuzGluast B.Dumibas. 


land-office business and bringing joy to the hearts 
of thousands of San Franciscans who are revel- 
ing in the novelty of a form of amusement that 
heretofore had been denied them. 

“Chutes at the Beach” is the name of the 
new park, which occupies virtually two entire 
city blocks and faces the Esplanade bordering 
the Pacific Ocean. Here are to be found a new 
type of chutes, devised and patented by Looff; a 


= 
PID 
ie nat is 5 ta pica 


shows. This park has the advantage of being 

accessible from every part of San Francisco py 

street car, the fare being five cents. There ig 
no gate charge—another feature which has 
added considerably to the park’s popularity. 

Just outside the park gates there is parking 
space for thousands of automobiles, and attend- 
antg are provided by the park management to 
look after these, so that their owners may spend 
as long a time as they desire amusing themselves 
and at the same time be free from anxiety as to 
their property. 

But, after all, “Chutes at the Beach” is but 
a beginning, and, 
while it always 
will be a popular 
and well-patron- 
ized amusement 
resort, it is handi- 
capped in one im- 
portant respect. 
There is no bath- 
ing beach. 

Altho the Ocean 
Beach is one of the 
most beautiful 
beaches in Amer- 
ica, a dangerous 
undertow makes 
bathing exceeding- 
ly dangerous and 
not to be attempted 
by any other than 
the most expert 
swimmers, 

Several plans 
are now before the 
authorities to rem- 
edy this. One of 
these is the con- 
struction of an im- 
mense breakwater, 


riment, for, of 
course, the park is 
the property of the 
city and is free to 
all. Today, however, things are changing, and 
every indication is that San Francisco shortly 
will be well taken care of in the matter of out- 
door amusement resorts—better, in fact, than at 
any previous time in her history, for, outside of 
Woodward's Gardens of the early days and the 
Chutes, which were razed shortly after the great 
fire of 1906, the city has boasted of nothing of 
this character. 

The start in this direction already has been 
made by John Friedle and Arthur Looff, two well- 
known showmen with foresight and the courage 
of their convictions, 

Despite the gloomy predictions of many that 
San Francisco's public never would support an 
outdoor amusement park, Friedle and Looff laid 
their plans and invested their capital in a large 
plot of land near the Cliff House, where with in- 
finite pains they have built up a park of which 
any city might justly be proud. 

Beginning in a small way a couple of years ago, 
they gradually increased the size of their hold- 
ings until today the park stands virtually com- 
Pleted and a paying proposition for its owners. 

Rides, shows and concessions all are doing a 


A dream today, but expected to be a reality before June 


roller coaster, the patented Looff bobsleds, an 
airplane swing, a whip, carousel, Dodgem, Ship 
o’ Joy, Ferris wheel, big dipper and Noah’s Ark. 


ie VLLLLOLLLPOOUS AMPED: 


ANNI UAL Pass 


——-To——_ 


THIS ENTIT Esortest 
SEAT TO BE F HE BENCHES & 


rors 


TRARY | 
WANN S 


23: 
re 4) 
Z 
+2 
2g: 
Ht F 
1G: 


‘ Yyntssesdditdidd pt thtid de ‘Me ith $ “i 


A stock joke 


In addition there are scores of concessions of 
every imaginable type and several high-class 


which will effec- 


tively eliminate 
e the undertow, 
making bathing 


safe for everyone. This project, however, is one 
that will cost millions of dollars, and the possi- 
bilities of its accomplishment in the near future 
are very slight. 

Another drawback, even tho the breakwater 
becomes a reality, is the fact that the water at 
the beach is almost too cold for comfortable 
bathing, even on the warmest summer days. 

Possibly in time to come there will be an arti- 
ficial beach and immense tank as.a part of the 
park. This has been contemplated by Friedle 
and Looff, and, if constructed, would greatly add 
to the attractiveness of the park, proving a big 
drawing card, 

This handicap, however, does not exist at Pa- 
cific City, at Burlingame, a few miles down the 
San Francisco peninsula and accessible from all 
parts of the city by street car, as is “‘Chutes at 
the Beach.” 

Pacific City today is but a dream. Neverthe- 
less it is a dream that wil] come true in the very 
near future, for there are substantial business 
men behind the project and the actual work of 
construction is now well under way, ground hav- 

(Continued on page 263) 


Vinge —— " - age e3) ——— 


menos . ee ee 
2% 


+ --___— ees 


$ 


Main entrance Chutes at the Beach, Frisco, showing part of auto parking space 


Chutes at the Beach, Frisco, showing terminus of Municipal Railway. 


. 


P’ | 
) aa 
seatett i 3 : “ie foers ~ 5:5 i a 
Sisliegittiadl ss @ mite Bere ae iy D eae cree iy ; REE § z 
4 
i 
: | a “4 
_— ” 
Spee ae f x 
ae _ 
OP ~m, SAN MATEO —. fL _ ; 
i Te Thty AP dese ie wa - | *= ] “Aer : ; 
- Pivastes TT4™. SS Ase > toy pe See = 
S7aE ke — —~ hae - 
SS, Sea a 
(=> = a | =I 7 q 
. WARTS RGR 5a j 
aye A ate Nil ‘of 
aif ~ : - -* ros) : 
a. | >» >? sa Sait a salt mention d 1 ; 
.) in tle Brann ee ee pi ast :. 
— % { t ‘ ° ~ + ers ‘7 
printe me Wy aa ae \o Sy e a 
: ‘é yt ¥ ae 8 ah > \ ee 2 i 
\ Cee “6 ify . BA ust — Tak , 
Ba eee GE RS ] 
Won = a ss eee | > 
Ug fee OAM eo 5 Sh — Ai ij 
— 1h RE Oe — oe SOx 3: 
; ‘Vy cs? OE a i f par > Ty | : 
- — -—_— ~ Se 3 
“, oo mae ogee A thy tee “age & Fe 
' a ss ome ae wr a ’ a 
-- si ral -. aati pe eee ’ : 4 
a a 
— ™ ~~ es —_ Pal 
anh - — 4 : 
. aa | 
it 
ee g 
BP ' 
Po | | 
| 
i a 
Fi 
gi 4 
IN |GOLOYN - fe 
Z 3 
4 Air 1g 4 
, ac Secryv ig 7 
Soc : 
GREE 3 3 Eee a 
; 2 
tee | : ‘ 2 “3 "es 
foresees a 5, ; & 
4 os ™ . : Go oe . ‘ - 
2 > ” 3 D : # P “ - " 
Mim «eo a ere fi | Se > eae 
opal ES 0 ee tie POEs | dee! ime i} se re hee Be REY ee ‘ae ke q 
P @ ba 3 cm ' os 4 so gsieenat ; S : BE J i acs ee ce 2 —— a : . eae wit ee e e ott e e : gs “ es A ay. i : ; 
Y heer Nace ~_ See BE DR bye Bas she Trot aie oo é agipetiet Get” S see ee Be Oe ge 2 ae s 
Bere > ty. “SS ae RES Ne A 4 Rely hb ~ REEY = ef wee ia 4 shoal #2 AF Cas TP be etapa ge 6 a 3 
roe ern ereee ai . Keak ws ; : + - : * gael ce “Gp cig st ae Bat ger ve. — i. ¥ Ge FE fined Ss pre q 
dea, “hd alsa YE ee ee eee ah : 
a RTT OS tae ris S gard | Sate Te aes ne 4 se i eg <a fi 
PR al 856 Ia in oe eM ee MERE - errs mee - a : * eae * iA betes & ae ee ee — 3 Sie es oe A | Fs : yee + 4 os 
mati LS Clon gto ee to ee Seg ? we ele a! wen ge Re UCR ee gern Mae hy 
ite mo US tae ee A PT eee A ico. Ph ee te , gee le 
“a dip tage! wikis gee Mad kag ee fee 3 3 ea tl at :_ 
oN Cee ee ee Nees Se Soe ae a 2 tat ae | ey ae . 5 ae Ha serene asc — gion f ; 
ares Bs: + es, en a ee a re Rae Ee: pa a er "i 2a, Ee a2 a AS ed = a4 sist P. * a EG 3 : : a . : pe : . ee y a me 2 “ae | a 
; ay Rie: ~ : Het — SS eR sete ae tg ap fe) ey TTT Ti ' So es ee ; ee bide op 4 pt orf # 
a 8 cde mie ewe CEO id we I ee FEE be 
4 ‘ - . and : r Nd Be rs fe em F ated |: yas ‘ — ,  ¢ sesame saihiase sf ee : 3 re, pe bee agit So coy BS _ 
& 
E/ 
. a 
ry iy yt - 
@! ? 


Qh ae et en 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


« 


IRRCINGIINCIIIEIGR 


aflet 


HERE is little doubt that 
tertainment in the form of clean, 
stirring, amusing, original and pic- 

turesque offerings has become one of the 
most successful features in the public program of 
today. That it has been gaining in importance is 
clearly shown in a glance at the development that 
marks the constant advance and improvement 
from year to year, the gradual elimination of the 
vulgar and the commonplace, the demands of the 
promoters of fairs, celebrations and civic events, 
the popular taste and the inventive genius of the 
performer. 

It hasn’t been so very long since “get the 
money anyway” was the rule rather than the ex- 
ception. This was a common cause, coming out 
of a growing demand for “something” that would 
entertain, encouraged somewhat by the fact that 
the greater number of 
our novelties came from 
abroad, and performers 
and originators who had 
a different standard than 
the American inclina- 
tions. 

Gradually the process 
of standardization has 
continued until today 
outdoor entertainment 
has its place among the 
highest grade, whole- 
some, amusing and stir- 
Tring forms of diversion 
offered the public. It is 
truthfully said that good, 
clean amusement and 
entertainment is as es- 
sential to the morale of 
the people as the air 
they breathe. 


outdoor en- 


RRANGING a pro- 

gram for outdoor 

entertainment de- 
mands as much discrimi- 
nation, careful planning 
and balancing of materi- 
al as any theatrical pro- 
ducer or architect or 
civic commission has in 
undertaking. This may 
sound extravagant until 
we stop to reason it 
out. The promoters of 
the various enterprises, 
fair managers, local com- 
mittees, park directors 
have a general idea of 
what their public would 
enjoy and = appreciate 
and how much money is 
available to provide it. 
In the selection of the 
actual material they 
come to the point of con- 
act with the distribu- 
ors, the men and women 
engaged in the profes- 
of securing and 
handling this material 
and offering it for selec- 
tion. In all this relation- 
ship there must be a 
foundation of mutual 


Ba 18.12. Carrwtiners 


giving a picturesque, impressive, rhythmic em- 
bodiment of youthful grace and harmony and 
talent. I doubt if there is a stronger attraction 
to everyone, and it serves as a splendid card pre- 
ceding the great night exhibition of pyrotechnics. 

We speak naturally of “fireworks,” possibly 
without thought of the magnificent art and science 
of pyrotechnics, the ingenuity and awe-inspiring 
detail of the brilliant, multi-colored pictures, the 
thrilling bursts of light and sound, wonderful 
transformations, the aerial splendor, becoming 
features and the ah-dh-ah’s of the grand finale! 
Truly the modern pyrotechnical program is a 
fitting close to the day of sights, music, sensational 


confidence, integrity, 
judgment and the know!l- 


most exciting outdoor features ever created, 
with its riskiness, skillful and rapid action 
and frequently ludicrous mishaps and sit- 
uations. 

LLUSTRATING my point of the success, edify- 
ing character and popularity, of clean, up-to- 
the-minute and first-grade outdoor features, | 

want to mention by name a few acts with which 
it is my pleasure to be associated. What could be 
more interesting and informative, as well as en- 
tertaining to ourselves, our children and our 
neighbors, than to witness the perfect athletics of 
the Belleclair Brothers, known internationally as 
“The Master Athletes of Them All"? Thev stand 
forth as most remarkable exponents of physical 
culture, give a performance that is a delight and 
succession of astonished admiration, the climax 
the almost incredible and indescribable feat of 
one brother looping the 
loop, fiying thru the air 
and being caught hands 
by hands by the other 
brother. Nothing could 
find more favor than 
Fink’s Comedy Mules, 
with ponies, dogs and 
monkeys, to give remark- 
able exhibitions of ani- 
mal training and clever- 
ness, and all together 
combining their talents 
in one of the most gen- 
uinely laughable = and 
ingenious performances 
given anywhere, This 
has proven one of the 
biggest drawing cards 
for children and _ the 
grown-ups offered in 
vaudeville or open-air 
entertainment. Who 
would ever believe that 
a woman would rise to 
the heights of fame and 
sensational achievement 
of Ruth Law, the su- 
preme aviatrix? Noth- 
ing in the history of 
death-defying nerve 
and accomplishments has 
outshone the feats and 
thrilling evolutions of 
this true “queen of the 
air,” yet all accomplished 
by this modest young 
woman from whose book 
many a mighty ace could 
well take a leaf. There 
is a whole volume of 
leadership in acrobatics 
and gymnastics in the 
performance of the Fly- 
ing Codonas, whose trap- 
eze feats have apparently 
set the mark for al! 
others to attain. One of 
the unequaled achieve- 
ments is a triple somer- 
sault caught by the 
hands; not an occasional 
successful effort, but re- 
peated at every perform- 
ance. This is only one 


Upper left> Codona Family. Upper right: Fink's Mules. Left: May Wirth. Center: E. F. Car- 


of a number of equally 
startling and supposedly 


. . ° . impossible feats per 

edge that comes from ruthers, general manager United Fairs Booking Assn. Right: Ruth Law, Bottom: Bellclair Bros. formed by this wonder- 

a ful troupe. The equip- 
It has been my good 


fortune to aid in building up a service to the pub- 
lic, the promoters of the seasonal events or regu- 
lar establishments and the performers alike. 
Eternal vigilance is required to develop the all- 
round confidence upon which the success of such 
a service depends. It is a matter of natural prog- 


ress, development, combining the satisfying forces 
of performers, booking representatives and those 
engaged in preparing the programs for their all- 
important clientele, the Public. 

Coupled with the professional entertainment 
is the direct, wholesome and box-office attractive- 
ness of the loca] features, arranged thru the 


guidance and training of experts. I don’t believe 
there is a more really powerful appeal to the av- 
erage gathering than the spectacle or historic 
pageant in which the participants are the children 
and young men end women of the community, 


acts, tests of speed, physical prowess and rhetor- 
ical effort. 

With the arrival of the automobile and air- 
plane has‘ entéred a new and tremendously popu- 
lar form of outdoor entertainment, with its ever- 
advancing degree of sensationalism and amusing 
elements. The racing of horses will never fail to 
attract and thrill. 3ut the automobile race is 
something that brings us all to our toes and holds 
us there until the last moment of the contest or 
exhibition. They are contemplating now in the 
inner circles of motordom a racing vehicle that 
will cover the grounds at the rate of three miles 
a minute! Will it be a sensation and drawing 
card? Ask me. Ask the fair manager. Ask the 
average man or woman. I regard the automobile 
race as a tremendous one-day feature aitraction 
at any feir, The suto-polo game ia one of the 


ment of this act is an 
adornment to any arena or space and invariably 
attracts a great deal of admiring comment. May 
Wirth, the embodiment of grace and recognized 
as the greatest bareback and equestrian star of 
the generation, is to the manner born and has 
broken all records for somersaulting on the back 
of a horse wHile galloping in the ring. This lit- 
tle artist has any number of unequaled achieve- 
ments to her score and has been responsible for 
introducing many unique novelties in this form of 
entertainment, 

And so we could preceed thru a long list of 
original, clever, startling, graceful, clean-cut, 
wholesomely entertaining and amusing acts, fea- 
tures and incidentals of the outdoor entertain- 
ment world. There are many offerings in this 
field that imagine ‘they are qualified but cannot 

(Continued on page one) 


1; segieethice ‘ Ps 5 : gE SHER geass: : R ips ee) 
_ . i : 
3 a fe , 
| ee 4 
' | \ Vey, 
, 4 # " 3 eho pests gente Sse) ISHARES: eterna 6 eA 
5 
te 
> 
- 
| 
ya 
Hd 
Po 
e 
if 
He 
¥ 
1st 
ead 
3 
; i 
+ 
& + Xf eee “Eta ie ‘ Ses Y 
id Ree ee es ec a a RR ae RE SG, UN REE S RS RRE 
at | ee ee i a 
Ww a. Ri ee OE 
th ae. Re . 
ie oN eee , oO i ae) > on : 
2%} . a > & o 
re a % ‘ - me = ‘ - 7 
He Pa oe . ; ee | 
eit) oO Fo ae : a D 
| & a saa ¥ . a oe @,. * ‘2 a 
a i Ly eS ie. 
‘| x HOES: = 
1 : us & + ie os ae : > - 
; a wie . ~ J ‘ . Te 
' : pe ' 
: ae Pot? aa 2 A 
ew aaa =I 
| ; ma = 
so ss 5 Be - og eee Eo heel | ope 
; es ee feat a eee ae tae See <¢ ee 
oh sae SS aca nt a LE ee eee 
Site j ee. ee ae a. a st x 
waht é aa ae r 7 2 : ~~ Sol Re. 
j : SL ay * a : : : J : 
; : P : pe ; “ i eo . 
; bn, om * thes = a * #3 
| Fe wm ..* ae is > - 
| / +s P. SS ae Bax ee Par 
| z 4 65 on 7 Thera 
% te 7 a ‘ face ‘ a " ; 
; : a A e ¢ re ee fe « 3 : eee F a 
: BZ) ie  * a ‘ 
pigs + ee - : i : So 
be Ge , 5 eae 4 
2 \ 
4 ae Bigs z ee IG aE é a 
. Seas Bee a * aon —— ~ Og mp - 
NS ee eee ti‘iCwN 
. Pikes os ee i OF wt,” Sor 
PSaergs ; oe LEER AAO ELE LD GEOR LLC ECT a it SBOE Rai 
Ea eee ; gee ee. 
OS an ager. _ 
i oe. ee y a eee . 
. fae -. | TiS 
=~ - ee es roe 
é oF ee? og fe og # / aly 
igi Se Ce BE es Lom i? ; . 4 
7 % a bs Ds a4 .. ~ eae fd it j NA J OP 
. ite scot | Ee I Sen 
2 a il omy ' os An } é 
; eo ee SS, eS | 
2 hes e Eee eee den bi ee SS = en 
sy UL ag we gre eis Tats Be. ERS te pao : ees. eee 
: ee * 4 th, 4 Si TOG: Soe ee ee © ee | Sate — . se 
Hie i SNe, ge ee eae - : : 
iy ies eh ehh = ig ah De NEO LE LAGE LE LL LL OTE INT Ce sii i ec ot 
Ps aa ee 
* 
} | | | 
| ’ 
‘ . 
4 , 
sr ' ~ “ | 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


na as Comet 


ITH admittedly the largest amusement- 
loving population of any city in the 
West, blessed with an ideal climate for 

outdoor recreations and endowed with greater 
wealth than any other metropolitan community 
on the Pacific Coast, San Francisco until very 
recently held the unenviable distinction of being 
one of the few cities of the United States without 
a single outdoor amusement park. 

True, there have been such resorts in Oak- 
land and Alameda, jast over the bay ‘from San 
Francisco, for many years. These have been patron- 
ized largely by San Franciscans, In fact, without 
drawing upon San . 
Francisco for their 
patronage they 
could not have ex- 
isted. Golden Gate 
Park, the city’s 
great playground, 
and the Ocean 
Beach have until 
very recently been 
the only places for j 
those desiring out- as ow Ws. > 
door recreation to > 
go, and the count- 
less thousands who 


have made it a <a WN SY 
practice to visit vie ™ Nie 
these have been wD, 
afforded no other 

amusements than 


nature provides. 
A stock joke in 
San Francisco is 
the “pass” to Gold- 
en Gate Park, 
which has ap- 
peared in many 
forms and has 
caused much mer- 


BuGluart B.Dunbasr 


land-office business and bringing joy to the hearts 
of thousands of San Franciscans who are revel- 
ing in the novelty of a form of amusement that 
heretofore had been denied them. 

“Chutes at the Beach” is the name of the 
new park, which occupies virtually two entire 
city blocks and faces the Esplanade bordering 
the Pacific Ocean. Here are to be found a new 
type of chutes, devised and patented by Looff; a 


shows. This park has the advantage of being 

accessible from every part of San Francisco py 

street car, the fare being five cents. There ig 
no gate charge—another feature which has 
added considerably to the park’s popularity. 

Just outside the park gates there is parking 
space for thousands of automobiles, and attend- 
antg are provided by the park management to 
look after these, so that their owners may spend 
as long a time as they desire amusing themselves 
and at the same time be free from anxiety as to 
their property. 

But, after all, “Chutes at the Beach” is but 
a beginning, and, 
while it always 
will be a popular 
and well-patron- 
ized amusement 
resort, it is handi- 
capped in one im- 
portant respect. 
There is no bath- 
ing beach. 


Altho the Ocean 
Beach is one of the 
most beautiful 
beaches in Amer- 
ica, a dangerous 
undertow makes 
bathing exceeding- 
ly dangerous and 
not to be attempted 
by any other than 
the most expert 
swimmers, 

Several plans 
are now before the 
authorities to rem- 
edy this. One of 
these is the con- 
struction of an im- 
mense breakwater, 


riment, for, of 
course, the park is 
the property of the 
city and is free to 
all. Today, however, things are changing, and 
every indication is that San Francisco shortly 
will be well taken care of in the matter of out- 
door amusement resorts—better, in fact, than at 
any previous time in her history, for, outside of 
Woodward's Gardens of the early days and the 
Chutes, which were razed shortly after the great 
fire of 1906, the city has boasted of nothing of 
this character. 

The start in this direction already has been 
made by John Friedle and Arthur Looff, two well- 
known showmen with foresight and the courage 
of their convictions. 

Despite the gloomy predictions of many that 
San Francisco's public never would support an 
outdoor amusement park, Friedle and Looff laid 
their plans and invested their capital in a large 
plot of land near the Cliff House, where with in- 
finite pains they have built up a park of which 
any city might justly be proud, 

Beginning in a small way a couple of years ago, 
they gradually increased the size of their hold- 
ings until today the park stands virtually com- 
Pleted and a paying proposition for its owners. 

Rides, shows and concessions all are doing a 


A dream today, but expected to be a reality before June 


roller coaster, the patented Looff bhobsleds, an 
airplane swing, a whip, carousel, Dodgem, Ship 
o’ Joy, Ferris wheel, big dipper and Noah's Ark. 


Witte 17 tie Wty VM, 


ass UAL Pass 


THIS ENTIT ESsOFTest #f 
SEAT TO BEF HE BENCHES 
IN : 


prececcccapapreecnercerapers, | ercere ay etal SPF Lore ° ° corcssoores, 
WLMLALLLTL LTS 07 Synth. SAGAS A: Z $ Vite Stl) CML 


7 
i wan ibe he eae sto ; % 


‘ 


PNM | 
WN S 


BSS 


{AQAA 


A stock joke 


In addition there are scores of concessions of 
every imaginable type and several high-class 


which will effec- 


tively eliminate 
the undertow, 
making bathing 


safe for everyone. This project, however, is one 
that will cost millions of dollars, and the possi- 
bilities of its accomplishment in the near future 
are very slight. 

Another drawback, even tho the breakwater 
becomes a reality, is the fact that the water at 
the beach is almost too cold for comfortable 
bathing, even on the warmest summer days. 

Possibly in time to come there will be an arti- 
ficial beach and immense tank as.a part of the 
park. This has been contemplated by Friedle 
and Looff, and, if constructed, would greatly add 
to the attractiveness of the park, proving a big 
drawing card. 

This handicap, however, does not exist at Pa- 
cific City, at Burlingame, a few miles down the 
San Francisco peninsula and accessible from all 
parts of the city by street car, as is ‘‘Chutes at 
the Beach.” 

Pacific City today is but a dream. Neverthe- 
less it is a dream that will come true in the very 
near future, for there are substantial business 
men behind the project and the actual work of 
construction is now well under way, ground hav- 

(Continued on page 263) 


\fain entrance Chutes at the Beach, Frisco, showing part of auto parking space 


Chutes at the Beach, Frisco, showing terminus of Municipal Railway. 


ore 


r a ” 
' i. seats AoE = Pe fs #24 a8 = c ane ts - Bagi Stair eas aes soe a 
ee ak ae : ; a a fe a tH : 5 Rae ) ee i ee er he i 
: : | \ a i 
: = 
_ 
ee 
, 
; 
ee 
fk 
= 4 
x 
ol Py \.-—=- .m, SAN MATEO __ M _ mt 
as 9 tea 2° = ~ ei - Pm {Oe a ' 
Gets ed es ; 
Step aiete: Lo GSS OS Ot a 
pw Fo G QD = . —— — 
as WS "? Gon : % wor. " - = - uy - - 
Prat SO = Vly. w I> % = a ~ : Me a | 
—) =< ih BET Ne a CA Ty tm 
aia SPE S nore a ae hate ae i 
a aXhi KPA RD Rg eer ra ity) Pye tees = -* 
gL Xt DSP PAS PSE 60 55a, WOT EE ae Lyy eb Pre gO 
Re is 1 Las its 7. 4 a iow ‘i ip ehstin oe" .* ps 7) «4? 2 
SSE Ne gh tet A Wa 2 pe 8G age TD caren? “e ma 
—- We AIRS nite on in WE MIE mm 
a e'| | AO RS ae 2S = See a 
' — <ceo =. a "" md it ey) 
IpariaetF SW ak = mre oe 2S i oS >° 7 
h ween a_i ey te tae Sr suai bie | BT * eal i 
»* y [- \ pehhoi tones nN —_ a WS) “ ij a koia . ‘ 4 ‘i 
Whila < . ret = se , pf TRAE ke ’ 7 
eh ee SMe pe Br EE Sen oe q 
{ > . a —_ ’ ee gee ° meet. ~ be? s hace  * 4 g 
“4 a 1 r= - 7a = ae a a a eg ly, ae va o c ' 
rt. = l ' ba a - on z Pd 
wt rT re, —< = ae 2 = s eee : ue * 
_ _—* oe - 
-* <a -“ ae - as * ; 
ne et ee 
° ee; “_ _— - cea 
. PP i Laget ° ; ~ 
: ln , aa | 
. a q 
tm 
ee aaa 
5 
a = | 
3) i . 
A i 
~ , # 
fF ef 
"ee | 
‘A fectas Secry if | 
a : 
eager one pee 23 Pe ; asl Fo Fe eae ee Es : eal : 
. : <p! eos : : ; . G ew 
a = ay y i ye Be ae . = 
eee ee eg She i 4 ' Ot OS ee 4 
DE Bs set gy Gree ee Saal ‘¥ eke ‘ , ee ee sy 4 
4 -ESAG he y RR ais Set iv aE es i dorm | Ps 0 ee Saar ‘ae x 
na ii # in : SS TRE of pi ¥ a = TEES ce > vgeh . . agmipartel Se pod es : vi i a oe ? de “ae = ats - f : 
ya : A =p aT. a as fan pen eS : " ip . s re ‘ J ' ek ere ition sit & esas + ee ees. wee ot ae 9 ek 2 ; s —- # eee ‘ 5 
oan” ea, At eee ME oe ae Ot ie a NB OG. ae iin eee TG j 
* i ee ose a Bie ‘s ¥ RR Sac re a wy a pa Mts — “gs as ‘a “om wet a “Se PPS gt ood s x [Nhe Baas ae a ; Ks 4 
BR ey me A tech 6 agen Mee gg a ee a es ee ea ee So a a ne F 
of Ay ed hg 6 Nome: St ines ye a 3 Loe ee > is co. oe ay ree Pag thelon ee 
‘fe F His ae ¥ bs be 3 ail cosh ae Cama - oe : Eat Se ~ Me ae J Ran ers aay Pe J aa nes: ost » “ay ree . és B ¥ % a 
ciel eS Ae +. Ogee Dee he hers AR ee a ee to Sar ee PTR anon ster 4 eee ik vided | Ree | 
pi r oem Sn ¢ Rat a: x eras See ke Re ae ths Auge: rl , et ace 5 2 oe Sue ; aE FS : 
* oo — ” < ; See og RH Re MO ete Se aes OQ ge Eye Tri Bae g- “Aes % oot ma. 3 rat - iat b- or 4 ot “OP, , 
ee ke Sees f Rg eo. As os" | oe EGGS ay We Eee eee Be. ma 
‘s 7 . ating ‘ - “ h e Pa oe... Ee a Sa SR Ss baie Sat es oe ee . iia are 
§ 
+ = 
JF i Ps 
Gy, a 
"1! m4 
BA t F - “ 
ae 


sm tS agen nage ee 


ES) a PT ON Ae OER 


omy 


esate 


SS ETT SA ee oo cares 


EN eae: 


nag tee 


12 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


NaTIONAL Assocuerion =’ Sigs 
tls Mims, Accomplisiumenis And Progress — 


S252 


NT PaRKs 


» last month there sat around in 
} } ditorium Hotel in Chicago 

less than a score of well-known amusement 
park men. They were th cently inter, so 


far as possible, tional 
Outdoor Showmen’s Association, whose founders 
tried to combine circuses, carnivals, fairs, parks, 
etc., each of which would be properly organized in 
its own division and the whole forming one united 
body. The proposition had looked good on paper, 
but with the exception of some park people, sev- 


men and one or two circus proprietors, 
interested to the 
After several years of 
men had de- 


eral fair 
the others as a class were not 
extent of getting together. 


practically going it alone the park 


cided the old plan would not work out. They 
wanted to dissolve the N. O. S. A., and, if possible, 
form a national association of their own. But to 
the meeting in Chicago so few responded that it 
looked for a time as if nothing more could be 
done than bury the 
corpse and forget 
the past. 

But the group, 


while small in num- 


ber, was large in 
class. In it were 
men of initiative, 
energy, imagination 
and enthusiasm. 
There was George 
Schmidt, the able 
general manager of 
Riverview Park, 
Chicago, and his ef- 
ficient assistant, Alf 
Hodge. There was 
former Judge Chas 
R. Wilson, of Fon- 
taine Ferry Park, 
Louisville, who also 
represented Tony 
Steuver, of Forest 
Park Highlands, St 


Louis. There was 
that well - known 
builder and opera- 
tor, Fred Ingersoll, 
of Detroit. From 
the East there were 
John R. Davies 
president and gen- 
eral manager of 


Willow Grove, Phil- 
adelphia; Frank W. 
Darling, president of 
the L. A. Thompson 
Scenic Railway 
Companies: R. §&. 
Uzzell, of circle 
swing fame, and the 
old war horse, Hen- 
Auchy, president 
the Philadelphia 
boggan Co. From 
Pittsburg ime the 
Writer and Frank L. 
Danahey, 
of Kennywood. Ther 
were Milford Stern 


BrA SME Swigan 


of Amusement Parks. Officers were elected and 
the small group went home to work and build up 
the organization. There was but little oratory, 
but after the meeting there was considerable ac- 
tion. How well the builders succeeded can be 
attested by any one of the almost 200 park men 
and women who attended the third convention in 
Chicago last December. 

Whether they were there as members of the 
association or whether they came as visitors, all 
of them went back home with the feeling that 
the trip was well worth while and that the asso- 
ciation is a valuable asset to the park business. 
The feeling some may have had that a park mana- 
gers’ convention would be merely a good excuse 
to get away from home for a few days for a good 

time had been dissipated. Park managers are 

pleasure providers, but in their conventions 
they have shown they are not pleasure seek- 
ers, They have had so many serious problems 
to discuss and so much business to transact 
that next year instead of a two-day conven- 
tion the meeting will be extended over three 
days. This will relieve the hardship of all 
day and evening sessions, but the policy of 
no banqueting, no theater going and no joy 
riding will be continued. The National 
Association of Amusement Parks is a busi- 


tion of the petty annoyance to the patron and 
the additional labor and expense to the park 
owner who had to keep on hand and handle large 
stocks of pennies and at the end of each month 
fill out complicated blank forms in making re- 
turns of the tax to the district revenue collector. 

If the association had never done anything else 
or ever will do anything else this one accomplish- 
ment justifies its existence and should make every 
man and woman in the business feel that mem- 
bership in such an organization is well worth 
while. And we are not going to stop on past per- 
formance. We took the best we could get on the 
matter when we compromised on ten cents or 
less, but we propose to continue our work until 
all admission taxes on the poor man’s amuse- 
ments are abolished. 

In connection with the reduction of admission 
taxes is the abolition of the tax on all passes, which 
was a nuisance to every man in the amusement 


field. One carnival 
company, I have 
been told, had to 


Henry B. Auchy, 


: . carry two extra men 
Second Vice-President y 


last summer whose 


whole time wags 
taken up _ looking 
after and properly 
accounting for the 
tax on passes. The 
association also se- 
cured the favorable 
recent ruling on 
minimum taxes on 
repeat rides and had 
considerable to do 
with securing the 
decision that where 
there is a difference 
in price between la- 
dies’ and gentlemen's 
admission to dancing 
pavilions and roller 
rinks the tax on la- 
dies’ tickets is on 
the amount paid for 
admission regardless 
of the price paid by 


of Pala Gardens, 
Detroit; D. S. Hum- George A. 


Schinidt, 
phreys, Euclid Beach, 


Treasurer 


Cleveland: John R 
Gammeter and F. C. 
Manchester, of Summit Beach, Akron: H.C. Tra- 
ver, builder of circle swings and other dev ces; 
E. J. Kilpatrick, the globe trotter; Austin McFad- 
7 ae ; > Sdee .) io a e i 
den, of Grand Rapids; Fred Pearce, of Detroit, 
and Charley Browning, Chicago 

These men had seen the Ips nd downs of the 
park business. The had vision and they knew 


the « vis 
They knew that every man in the } 


on and “seeing things.” 


is nings. 


nusiness could 


he . , ] = thetés.m 68 , 1 

better nimself and etter n park business DY ore- 
fanizatior They talked it over and decided to go 
to it. While lone on enthusiasm and ideas they 


were decided!y short on membership. But realiz- 
ing that they hod starte] wrong. they 
dissolve the N. O. S. A. 
of park 

enough to 


decided to 
nd form an association 
organization being flexible 
include State a eounty y itnral 


i “£T)1 tural 


men, the 


fair managers. Judge Vi'son. from his je¢al store 
of knowledge, whipped into be'ng articles of in- 
corporation, a constitution and by-laws. The 


“baby” was christened the National Association 


A. S. McSwigan, President 


ness machine and it has been successful be- 
cause the officers have insisted on business- 
like conduct of its affairs, 


HAT has the association done for the 
park owner, manager or conces- 
sioner? It is solely responsible for 

the recent change in admission taxes which 
went into effect January 1. Just a year ago 
when the Ways and Means Committee of 
ihe House of Representatives began its work 
on the new tax schedules it was then proposed by 
Treasury Department officials to raise the 
sion taxes from ten per cent to twenty per cent. 
The legislative committee of the association 
busy and not only su 


—— 
aqmis- 


got 
ceeded in defeating the at- 
tempt to increase the tax, but secured the entire 
eliminatioh. of the tax on ten 
missions. 

This means that when we open in the spring 
in parks, rides, shows, ete. 
is ten cents or less. there will be no tax This 
naturally means that where the tax was paid by 
the patron the latter will have what he saves on 
taxes to spend in the park and the park or conces- 
Sions will get the benefit in increased receipts. Th 
the park owner or concessioner who absorbed the 


cents or less ad- 


where the admission 


tax in the price of admission it 
of one cent on each adm! 
considerable increased 


means a saving 
This will mean 
revenue on the season's 


sion 


business. The elimination also means the aboli- 


gentlemen for ad- 
mission to the sams 
place. The associa- 
tion also had a lot 
to @o with the en- 
tire elimination of 
taxes on soft drinks 
and beverages, many 
millions of gallons 
of which are sold in 
parks. Much of the 
credit for good work 
getting favorable 
rulings and decisions 
from the Treasury 
Department should 
be given to Mr. Leon- 
ard B. Schloss, gen- 


eral manager of 
Glen Echo Park, 
Md., whose offices 
are in Washington. 


In quite a few 
States last year leg- 
islation inimical to 
the park interests 
was proposed, Wher- 
ever the association 
officers heard of this the matter was taken up. 
In Pennsylvania a proposition to impose a gross 
sales tax on amusements was defeated, as was an 
equal rights bill, which, if passed, would have 
caused park managerg much trouble in dancing 
pavilions and restaurants where in the interest of 
public safety it is absolutely necessary to draw 
the color line. The fact that the park men have 
a4 union has much weight with legislators. This 
demonstrates the value of unity. 

The association has closely co-operated with 
the Anti-Blue Law League of America, which has 
done much good work in the national capital 
and thruout the country in the way of opposing 
viclous legislation which would prevent park 
managers serving the public on Sundays. The 
association has taken the position that the Amer- 
ican people do not want what is commonly called 
a Continental Sunday, but they do want and 
should have a Sunday on which they can have 

(Continued on page %6@) 


A. R. Hodge, 
Secretary 


— . SS... — — _ 
ae | 7 i 
: 
4 
i — 
if 
J - 
aes 
i 
Ti 
; ’ 7 Pt ” % ta a 
| decile ss, : 
#! igre zs " om he = 
: wie oo x Yous 
ee ¥ : oo 
bid al x s 
“ " ' 4 
| 7 & = &. 
2 e or ; i ae ene ei 
z * » : $ af is? Fe. $e SIP Ra eee ES a Pon ree Fe eT ae we : - 
: " : ¥ AER ngs Sag oe pene at AE > Se ie noe ef 3 5 
: : # | Sr ae eae = agree gi gees ee ee ‘ 
- B F J 7 ee FM r ede re Sern Ge Re. « a sé 
a é ea is ‘ ee te 3 ; 
ee , - oe ae e 5 ty Uh % : 
' os fe ie e — ie a he le \ 
cee = ps % es eae Es. ‘ 
| SAC he z 4 : ee : ) 
Rens oe? 3 j 5 ray et it 4 7. ¢ 
ig ‘a : be — 
a = . Cee: ‘ aR iy 2 Be Fa ra Fr 
Pe Bis. 7S scuiil —" . ‘ = 
Se oe ¥ + Ey = a - — a 
rs <a 3S ae ‘2 . hs - 
5 3 sO 7 oy ere ete % ss a 2 sag _ f Pes > 3 
es RN ——. cage 
. » a } . an 5 é 
a i —. ; & i o~ 
Pea | > oe : &e: 
———————— ee ees “a = £e*: 
ye mee sk a to - * = " 
3 ee es 3 et He: as Sg - a Bartek. oe : 
St. 4 et ro. ae ae es Fo fe ae "ie Yi 
¥ eek. J x coo: oe rei aE we. i y 4 ee ; 
¢ , S N f - q - . 4 ea . = : 5 ‘ p 
ge , = a a $ : 
o% 4 . % a - = 7 ¢ 7 
ee! i 2 ae * ' 
ade apa 
ae ‘ eS ake ee 5 mg — 4 br 2 
- H ae os 4 : 
ek i z Ae Ss 55 e ae , a 
Ce San % a ‘ . gale , : ean __ aes 4 7 : Be gas ‘ot 3 
. —  & es 3 a eee ne 
é . ee ere Fe 2 5 Ra eee Se g , * cm rq : 
: — - eae ee | . 
ne : 4 S| eae e = eect, ONE anaes cee tin Se i. ae 
Age ae S ~ o Ss. sey yes ee ee i ite > 6 oe he 
es ; : - — ‘vas : 
Bi : ganna ae ao ee ; 
cs re ‘ 2 oa 
x Ss ee t Sgt cae ; 
4 4 a ‘ -. a ¥ Pe og ee 
yO! Na ne ‘ ‘oa 
pee ‘a ok 
: ee ge Gis: 7 
¢ oa ype ee ox. aut ig Cages, . 
oH a ee » ET xe ie . *% ie 
aig | Pa es : : 
Ba | > mesma ae cline scan comm | 
ee 
a] 
_ 
4 
. . : ' 71 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


(He 


TER ImThe Struggle — 


Bor Success __ 


XPPEMIEMCES 


OU MAY hear many say that the day 
of spoken drama is gone and new 

things have come instead, but I believe 
it is just beginning. The people are tired 
of just “‘vision,” are hungry for “substance,”’ 
and the outlook never appeared brighter, both 
from a literary and financial standpoint. Good 
business, in my opinion, is on the way and com- 
ing fast. If such be not the case why do the 
Messrs.. Ringling Brothers improve each year 
and add extra costly features? They are bigger 
and better than ever and all because of their pol- 
icy of keeping abreast or a little ahead of the times 
and giving the public a little more than its money’s 
worth in legitimate and popular entertainment. 

My experience ‘in the show business is this: 
That the shoestring managers who try to put out 
shows with any kind of pickup actors, inadequate 
equipment, poor plays, ete., are “doomed for the 
rocks” at the outset. But the real managers who 
make the tented theater their business, their life 
work, to stand or fall by it, who always give the 
people the best obtainable in plays, real actors, 
proper surroundings to work under and clean, 
pleasing vaudeville, good music, etc., are bound 
to succeed. 

One of the greatest factors In the success of 
any manager is practice of “smilin’ thru” in spite 
of obstacles encountered. Cultivated courtesy, 
smiles and cheerfulness will win more people than 
any other thing. The entire force from the front 
door to the stage should always be on hand with 
asmile, a “Thank you” and “Is there anything I 
can do for you?” The ticket sellers, the door 
men, the reserved seat men, the ushers and the 
orchestra, as well as the lookouts on the outside, 
should strive to outdo each other in this respect. 

Another factor of importance is courtesy to 
the press and the city and county officials—the 
ones who can do you more harm or good than 
anyone else. Favors extended to them always 
bring the biggest returns and do much to pro- 
mote better conditions for the future—wider 

rivileges and a friendly feeling all around. 


ERFECTION has ever been the aim in every 

line of endeavor and its realization has never 

been reached at a single bound, but by re- 
peated successful attempts to improve every factor 
that goes to make up a completed work, improv- 
ing at each step the imperfections of the preced- 
ing one until a finished project is the result after 
weeks, months or years, generally the latter. 
The progress made and the successful achievement 
realized by one of the most successful shows in 
America reads like a fairy tale or the develop- 
ment of any of our modern improvements, like 
the growth of the airplane or steam engine, from 
the dreams of Darius Green and his flying ma- 
chine to our perfected air and seaplanes, or the 
tea-kettle day dreams of little James Watts to 
our wonderful perfected steam engines of today. 

Beginning over twenty years ago with what 
Was really a rag opera each year has brought suc- 
cessive improvements until today our tented 
theater is the last word in comfort and efficiency. 
In the days when I started trouping the stage 


Bsr J. Doug. Morgan. 


was small, awkwardly constructed with one of 
the center poles in the center of the stage, an 
encumbrance in every way except for one play 
where a flag pole was needed, and then it was a 
useful prop fora moment. The stage only reached 
across the opening of the proscenium arch and 
the actors dressed on the ground on either side, 
brushing dust from their eyes on dry, dusty lots 
and wading in mud and water and putting their 
trunks on piles in rainy weather. With cum- 
bersome scenery, props and furniture borrowed 
here and there, the actors making the sets, tak- 


J. Doug. Morgan 


ing down the top and putting it up again in the 
next town, the village drayman hauling the equip- 
ment as he found time between express and 
freight deliveries, always slow and often late, and 
nearly always unable to get the outfit in the box 
car provided by the none too accommodating rail- 
road company. The seats for the audience—rude- 
ly constructed benches—ofttimes of boards bor- 
rowed from the lumber yard, and, of course, un- 
comfortable and tiresome, and always handicapped 
on account of being unable to heat the tent and 
play only during the warm summer months. 
Torch lights, oil and gasoline lamps and finally 
acetylene gas were used for illumination. About 
a dozen’ years ago, hoping to overcome some of 
these obstacles and expedite hauling and jumps, 
I purchased several cars, teams, wagons, and 


with this added equipment attempted to 

revolutionize tent show transportation. My 

Wagons were especially built eighteen feet 

long, eight feet wide, with eight-foot wings 

on the sides so that the three wagons which 
earried the entire equipment composed the 
stage when placed together, 24x54 feet, hauled by 
two heavy draft teams. I also carried a cook- 
house, a hand-carved band wagon (which wag 
also used for a gilly wagon), a special car for the 
people and a pony and trap which led the parade. 
All of the above equipment being transported on 
three of my own flat cars, but it proved tco ex- 
pensive and cumbersome, and I only carried it 
one season. 

But thru these wonderful glasses of mine 
what a change can be seen! Now we have; made 
at my own special order, a square end tent thea- 
ter with a stage reaching from wall to wall, dress- 
ing rooms high and dry, all on the stage. The 
center pole eliminated, and for twenty or thirty 
feet in front of the stage no obstruction of any 
kind. <A specially constructed flat scenery, spe- 
cial drops and complete electrical equipment, 
needing only a connecting wire to the city plant. 
Carrying all my props, furniture and every ac- 
cessory used in modern theaters. The auditorium 
proper having sawdust aisles, and in wet weather 
having sawdust floors with comfortable high-back 
chairs and benches. And today, instead of the old 
stereotyped plays usually used and often out of 
print, we have new royalty plays from the pens 
of the best authors, making it a1! in all a com- 
fortable tented palace warmed by large, specially 
constructed stoves of my own designing,’ allow- 
ing us to play in any kind of Weather conditions 
with assurance to the public that they will be as 
warm as in the majority of theaters. 


Ms. difficulties present themselves today the 
same as twenty years ago—the problems of 

suitable towns and cities, lots, competition, 
ete. My greatest success has been in cities of from 
ten to fifty thousand population, altho many towns 
of smaller size are played to splendid returns. My 
equipment does not consist alone of the property 
described above, but includes a Pullman car with 
staterooms, dining room, kitchen and bath, with 
our own water and lighting system, refrigerating 
plant, etce., which my wife, J. D. Jr., and I call our 
home, altho I have a farm at Jacksonville, Tex., 
which produces some of the finest fruit, cotton 
and vegetables in the State. This year I offered 
the members of the company a portion of any- 
thing they chose from the products of my farm 
to send home, each of whom availed himself of 
the opportunity, and gallon cans of ribboncane 
syrup down to the finest sweet potatoes were sent 
by them as well as myself to relatives. A com- 
pletely equipped baggage car is carried, and this 
not only holds the entire show property, but my 
limousine and the ever-useful two-and-a-half-ton 
truck which hauls the outfit to and from the lot. 
A crew of seven working men, an orchestra and 
a most capable company uphold the traditions of 
this noted organization which has been built on 

(Continued on page @—) 


A typical tented theater 


SPT a Rng Ie EE 


he 


age Se ~ ody 
See eee He 


A winter scene on the “lot” . 


— 


7 ° / 
™ : 
—— en 3 
t 
. . 
seogitediessagesscteazagsts steggtigesetastesenemeat riage fisaieectesieteh chit a ; fi rebisdeutenercesienszersstesseae’ rettess 2 a. 
: % ¥ ba 
Pe i : 
i 
M : 
aa 
a 
7 
r 
a 
| e 
¥ 
. - 
: 
if 
= 
5 
§ 
z is BE Ss! Ml Na i. se et Oe TS I I Na Mae Sai ae i 
ee a Oe eee j 
fe ee 2 
akc, ee a ee oe .- 
YER eee ' Sy BS Sa Ee aoe ; ; 
ie oid : ae PORES os 5 
Ss ee, Mes Bs I gaat ae a aa : Ps 
SNe st i Fe ee } : 
i ee S 
ee 4 ee ee x P - 
* ic ae eat pe a RR eS 
“Ks eae ee ae as be ee ; Ae pS , 
+> Sistas BE ke ee ’ n 
ns : é ees 5 
% Soong “ % . Paes : 
gate . e. i : plore Hite a 
ae aan i" % JO ee 
at fwd ms 4 Bet agrees Re : : 
et Ms , ee 7 
iar Ih a in Bees. : 
4 irae a 4 ae eects ie, ‘ 
et “ae iii gen Ri sce eS | 
Ses Sg 3 ete fs ig ae GPS " 
Be Se Be Oe oG a ae 
Se Sig Se ae ee ee o | 
Co See or ; aaa _ 
So. ¥ Sk. ee ee oe see zi Pa PS. te, Ae 
See yk ee P : tee oe q : 
ee tg pe ke - SE YS ae 3 ay 
ey ee eee ee 7 BES aoa ‘ 
ee em a: Be : Sys See : 7 
Crean ae oo. ir OSB e.g - 
Soe 2 s ; 
A Rie ae 
oe ee eee 7 
tS Oe a 
aes ae oe 
OPES See eret 
Re ge pe ae ey 
Seas Sh c? l 
———————______ ‘ F 
f / 
PE ‘ 
H 
® Cc 
i 
‘ 
7 
: - 
- 
3 
3 
if 
& 
¥ 
4 
* 
ae . 
a a 
: “i 
: i 
3 : 
z ™ 
gs 3 
4 on 
ie 
ee 
En 
—— —— ¢ Z| 
— ————— : . 
—— A... He in EEL OO rrr SY 2 ceo \ 
| ; . _ . ee cake Yo P > > 3 
Hl - Res RR a oe 5 Ne > 
| i ; as oe ar Ste he ee bet ’ ‘ we. - _ ae . - "4 F 
\ 7 Oo Be rn mite et Se ey ba 
po. Oe Bg) mS i 74 
ea jee eee OM <a e a 
6 NS Be Oe ees a it : RCS : | 
re oe _ SSS, Pe ait i ee Bes. : : 
ee ae , ak ee ee Ny 7 Se ; ‘ i ; : 
|. egies oe ee bn en ee aa 4 _ 
eS es tee, oo a Ee eee se Sy ity eS Ne eS 3 ee 
poet se OS ee ey" eS . Sg ee RR ta: A sy Wa Sots ‘ : ; 
eA re a > 8 — a ee cy : : jg SS ~S. . Se . oe : ; i 
ae Pe Re ek Oe 7 Sees Sg ae SERS : Sos : { : a : ; 
—a— — watts ¥ Sitter ee #1 Pee Se ON 3 ; 
ae cena : SES Vee a SS : 
oS ie ¢ SS “Ss SSS TENG eS z 7, a » * a ee 
al PRM ears Sage p ; sao : ; A SSS FSM SS ee a % mona’ Se ae sf i 
: ith conte < 7 x he: SR a g SSS RA SEERA SSS Sas ° Sa ~ & i ; ; i 
= oe ¥ % o : Se <a a a eS eo SSS 3 rae & SASS “a as ee. se : j k 3 ; 
* \ ; ee aS} . ) SRR SS — Ss a SESSA OS REE, SE gaa See a ee Bite. $ F : z - 
: —-. |) Yo $ Y a . we SS Sr RS So SS Sk 6c. Sed ; } Be ‘ : 
4 b a SS ae by Ss) Vas ; SUA Se Say SAS SO ek Eo ~~ wf ‘ er 
: SEE . we g i. 4-5 We SRC SS a WS 3 a RE SRRES 2 ER SR = = So ae a , rs 
a \ : a er : oR Roe eet 4 oy RRS S . SS ge Se POSS SEN AE RS ac ‘tia % 
wa SS hey meta VANS ees RSS ar RE A ee ~e ae “ 
hi \ 2 Sa ay te Se SS RS LS. Ss BOs Seer a SS SS KO PO A. ah 2 ¥ ig 
. : * we - ow 5 : SS 4 Re SS A a SS RR EE Se : = " ; 5 cet : ‘ 
PR | } - — : — : : “Fa5 Pe ae San SS ROS RSS > < 2‘ Seo Or : 
Law fe ~~ ,' : Fi heat : : ‘ } fe ef a ee a 9 ace SA < “SSS oS So : ~~ eK ee x eae. She | 
a a oe 4, ; . ys se RS ‘ ae Ro AS — Aes oS Se SERS OSS ok Saeed has af ee E “| 
2 ; : by rs: . = he * Ss REG Va. Aes ee 8 RES = QSAR AS SS $ Z 
‘ ont tut ee ; ’ wa seed t Lr SS Sat SERRE Se SS ESS ee so Sean Bs = at ¥ s é 
é ke a BS iL . ty ; eum Re SSS S SEE BR OR a SM ees et. é § 
i aie ++ . . SS Se WEA SSE SSS : RE AOC SE ER SRL ck Se Se Re eee Se 8 We 
rege Be — et — we So eR SS SCR far RR f 
T? =? says . 4 i { ; Wok BS . Se SSNS Ve RE NS SS . es 
i ab ‘ Wo .. . am — Sy a 8 d \ 5 aaah ee y . , S ey i 
’ e tie . ge © tts Ser ee SES & ‘\ ; a ee ee 3 : 
; & oa. STEN <_ o sie ; \ \ : \ ; 
re ; ‘SETS ‘ i roost mee Ses Rata ¥ 3 . ‘ : i \f P J : H i i j Sed Tt Bie 
. : Eg i ay 3 3 — aN YRS. , ‘ 4 . x -* 
A een ie 4 rs = al 1" f oy “aa Ns we oe ; 4 . . a3 ioe 5 
2 coke 5 Sa pm 4 re a \~ wey VFS ‘fae Sev ky t : F < : . : 
3 er Lae a Se alse - ‘ ‘ ; 4 
ae ee yi a } PE aa Re : T.. ts ; : , . 
f i. 6 A er Oe eS Ee Sa RT SS 2 : Fes . 3 _ 
j 
a 2% 
x ri 
mit ea 


Per ae 
3 : . 
a 


en ee ee 


a ta al 


Sats <5 
er) ig 


ee 


2 OR ete 


MARCH 18, 1922 


mm 1922 


FAT TUOUS Pos 


i 23% : ¢ 


RE the chautauquas suffering from the busi- 
ness depression? That is a question often 


asked. We will unhesitatingly say that 
théy are, but we believe they are suffering far 
less in proportion to their bookings than the 
theatrical interests. 
The reason for this lies largely in the fact 
that the chautauquas, and, to a lesser degree, the 
lyceum, are more nearly jocal affairs. There are 


many local interests back of al] there efforts that 
are not enlisted in the theatrical game They 
more nearly the spirit of play which in- 
terests life from the cradle to the grave and is as 
universal] in the animal world as it is with man; 
in fact, every living creature is endowed with the 
desire to play. 

Only a part, but that is a very large part, of 
men and women desire to be actors. Therefore 
the chautauqua mixes its appeal so as to more 
nearly satisfy a universal want than does the 
theater, and for that reason is suffering less at 
this time than its twin brother. 

Of course, to managers who have al- 
ways beer doing busi- 
ness on a rising market 
and who could fix their 


lie 
eniist 


those 


- cause the manager has 


Boy Fred, Llein 


abiding fundamental message that he has lived. 
His theme must be big enough to engage the best 
thought of the community. He must be able to 
open new visions to others and to show a prom- 
ised land just berond. The chautauqua has been ov- 
ercursed with a lot of glib-tongued:spielers, bally- 
hoo orators who could make a speech on any sub- 
ject, but who never stood hitched for two consec- 
utive minutes at any post of duty that called for 
an ounce of courage, conviction or inconvenience. 

The reason for the loss of power here is be- 
become. the proprietor 
when he ought to be the agent. When the 
scheme of bureaus collecting the fees was up for 
discussion I vigorously opposed it, for the obvious 
reason that it was fundamentally wrong. But 
there were too many willing serfs in the field, the 
talent was made the hired hand for the manager 
and the collecting agent for the bureau, and it is 


artists and musicians of merit. The sort of mv- 
sic that Napoleon Bonaparte had in mind when 
he said: “Of all the liberal arts, music has the 
greatest influence over the passions and is that 
to which legislation ought to give the greatest 
encouragement.” 

There are certain chautauqua systems whose 
programs are a cheap, amateurish imitation of a 
second-rate cabaret. Others show a preponder- 
ance of the flimsy flashes that are a hit today and 
a disgrace tomorrow. Such trashy, mushy, moron 
syncopation promoters reap the sort of Yeward 
that they deserve, 

The truth is that America is the most musical 
nation on earth. America was the most musica! 
nation on earth ’way back in the days when P. T. 
Barnum was the best judge on earth. That was 
why he exploited Jenny Lind in America. 

Many chautauqua managers have been con- 
tent to fool the public with aggregations of ama- 
teurs, hand-picked, emergency-trained and hud- 
dled-together combinations whose best efforts did 
not*even excite the envy of the village church 

choir or high school or- 
chestra, 


own overhead, set their 
own galaries, measure 
their own worth, buy 
their talent in the open 
market and sell it in 
secret, the fact that they 
will have two circuits 
this season where they 
had three last year will 
probably seem to them a 
calamity. 

That the chautauqua 
develops devotees who 
look to its annual visits 
with almost the same re- 
ligious fervor that actu- 
ates those who visit 
Mecca is attested by 
the large number who 
have never missed a ses- 


The largest percent- 
age of failures are easily 


located in these train- 
ing camps. 
Longfellow said: 


“Music is the universal 
language of mankind.” 
But that is no reason 
why we should imagine 
that mankind has but 
one thought, one emo- 
tion, one desire that can 
be reached thru musical 
appeal. 

The American people 
are quick to discern the 
motives of us all. Really, 
the public is almost un- 
eanny at times in its 
final analysis of the 


sion. This is true of the 
Mother Assembly, where 
a regular cult has been 
developed and whose 
happiness is not complete 
without an annual visit 
to Chautauqua Lake. 
That same spirit is 
found in those towns 
where the management 
has been wise enough to 
develop the local self- 
help spirit. It is deadest 
where the circuit-get- 
rich-quick Wallingfords 
have had full sway. There - 
has been a grand rush by 
a great many managers 
to boom and boost the 
small-cast dramas that 
have had unusual adver- 
i g, such plays as 
“Seven Keys to Bald- 


things that are put be- 
fore it. 

What is the result 
when one of these cheap 
managerial promoters is 
Caught with the goods? 
Just a constant dropping 
away, a backing off on 
the part of the public 
that at first seems un- 
noticeable, but is so con- 
stant that in time there 
is a sign “To Let” on the 
door and a stenographer 
is looking for another 
position. 

Don't forget that C. 
Durant Jones came to 
the International Lyce- 
um and Chautauqua As- 
sociation with a “plug” 
hat and a slogan, “The 
Greatest Chautauqua 


pate,” “Nothing But the 
Truth,” “It Pays To Ad- 
vertise” and others of 
that type have been 
boomed, boosted and 
featured as “Broadway 
successes,” with all-star 
casts, many of them re- 
cruited at a little inland 
college in Iowa. Others, 
of course, have been 
staged by the floating 
actors, with here and 
there one who had at 
least seen Proadway. Some of these efforts have 
been of sufficient merit to awaken an interest in 
the chautauqua as a possible rival to the local 
opera house and its traveling one-night shows. 

Superficial promoters have mistaken this pass- 
ing attention for abiding interest, these amuse- 
ment weather vane promoters are suffering a 
slump and for the same reason that the theatrical 
amusement purveyor is suffering. 


can singer. 


HE chautauqua stands for two things that 
are innately different from what the thea- 
ter stands for, and where these two things 

are put in the background the chautauqua loses. 

First: The lecturer must lead out with his 


that was reported by 50 or more committees. 
rector, will tour the chautauquas with his own 
tauquas furnish enthusiastic audiences. 


1—Van Grove Concert Co. Presenting the best standard operatic and concert selections. Mr. Van 
Grove is musical director Chicago Grand Opera, and Mar : 
tour. 2—Link’s Orchestra, one of the high-class musical organi 
educational merit which are inspirational and 
of music is appreciated. 3—Miss Edna Swanson 
company. Recently toured Norway and Sweden and was proclaimed the greatest Swedish-Ameri- 
4—Smith-Spring-Holmes Orchestral Quintet, which 201 lyceum and chautauqua com- 
mittees reported with an average of 9881 per cent, the highest given any musical organization 
5—Bohumir Kryl, celebrated cornetist and band di- 
Director Kryl has found the chau- 
His fifteenth year to play them. 


organization. 


that way today. We are suffering a slump in 
those quarters where the gumshoe methods have 
been fostered when the enlightened efforts of 
experience and progress should have dictated a 
different policy. 

There are those who have pursued a different 
policyy and they have thrived. They have de- 
served to thrive. Even now they are going ahead. 
At present the rule is to buy, beg or steal chau- 
tauqua towns, but where service has been rendered 
we know that the big Independent Co-operative 
System has been swamped with towns clamor- 
ing to get into the fold. 

The second great fundamental function of a 
chautauqua ig to provide sane, sensible music by 


y Garden's accompanist during her concert 
‘ganications that presents programs of 
thoroly enjoyable in towns where the better grade 

Ver Haar, soloist and at the head o 


System on Earth,” and 
his inflated proclama- 
tion is heard no more. 

Fred D. Ewell has 
testified in court that it 
takes no more skill, 
training nor ability to 
pick out talent for the 
public than it does 
merchandise Quaker 
Oats. The fact that 
there will be fewer 
chautauquas in 1922 
than certain systems 
booked in 1921 may not 
even cause some of our readers to do a little think- 
ing. But such things are to be studied by serious- 
minded people. 


her own 


Hi chautauquas are coming back, sounder, 
stronger and more purposeful than ever. 
Clarinda, Ia., last year celebrated its 25th 

anniversary with a profit of $1,000, and has 
1,800 season tickets pledged for 1922. For the 
four preceding years Clarinda suffered a big 4n- 
nual loss. 

Mattoon, TIL, has 2,299 season tickets sold for 

1922. 


Bloomington, Ill., James L. Loar’s home town. 


&@ 


on ae ; > : = oe ; y ; : : 
. gies he Billboarc 4 
: sapassmonmrsesr cai toe 
| L 
j 
4 . 
— 
' 
| 
i 
K 
4 
jh eee. =| | | 
| Ee ee ete Vv 
: a. © aloe oa 
; md - : : A 
=e a = j F em : a 
; Fa ii al : * ; : 
2 a 9 ‘ " LeeLee PS Ne ee \ 
ja - 41) BPR Wy a! 
hee | . = Hi i: % 
. a Hf : 7 
| | 2 “ | 7? oe y “ 
; * ae oc od | is . Los 7 . 
| 4 a +n : 
x ‘4 . 4 ree, 
) : ‘ phere 
* , Le Ne Met ee eee cs (5) 
—_— 
d 
Hy 
si a a ae 
4 
ee 
| 
: ‘| 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


will have a Chautauqua this year 
after two years without one. Bloom- 
ington was formerly a good chau- 

uqua town, but it died of anemia. 
rhe first big thing that the new 
Rloomington Kiwanis Club has set 
for itself to put over igs the sale of 
1.000 season tickets for the chau- 
tauqua. 

There is a story being peddled 
around by a few managerial bri- 
gands, who hate to see their pre- 
tended sacred altar kicked over and 
their fakery exposed, to-the effect 
that Fred High ig hired by some 
circus, carnival or theatrical inter- 
est to kill the lyceum and chau- 
tauqua, and to these birds it may be 
of interest to know that at the crit- 
ical time in the organization of the 
Rloomington Kiwanis Club this same 
VYred High journeyed to Blooming- 
ton and helped to organize this club 
that is now backing the big sale of 
tickets in the effort to make Bloom- 
ington once again one of the great- 
est chautauqua towns in America. 


15 


Delaware, O., is a great college 
town, It takes more than the Jazzy- 
Jingo Girls or the Fluffy-Ruffle 
herd to arouse much enthusiasm at 
Delaware. During the college year 
they hear the best that there is to 
be heard. But Delaware has already made a suc- 
cess of its season tickets, and when the chau- 
tauqua time arrives there will be another chau- 
tauqua held at Delaware. 

Leavenworth, Kan., a nationally known re- 
sort, had an independent chautauqua for a number 
of years, then they tried a circuit until they could 
not get any more suckers to guarantee the man- 
agerial exploiters, so they decided to rely upon 
their own efforts, and are now going at it with en- 
thusiasm, determined to put over their 1922 pro- 
gram, 

Moberly, Cameron and Salisbury, all in the 
“show me” State, are alive with the community 
determination to put over their 1922 chautauqua. 

A great number of bureaus will present their 
usual circuits this season. As far as we can learn 
most all of the chautauqua systems will come thru 
with their normal business, the exceptions being 


ing the first session ten years ago. 


evident on many sides. The Rad- 
cliffe Bureau hag announced that it 
is thru with the foundry-made mu- 
sical organizations and that here- 
after it will hire nothing but indi- 
vidually organized companies. It 
hasn’t announced its policy as to 
lecturers, but the real thing is that 
the bureaus see that there is need 
of making the chautauquas function 
better in the local communities, 

The circuits, of course, furnish 
the great preponderance of talent 
that is presented on the chautauqua, 
and their business depends upon two 
things: Highly organized sales effi- 
ciency and the degree of satisfaction 
that is being rendered to the local 
communities. 

The tendency until recently has 
been to stress the effort on the sales 
force. But the competition is now 
getting so keen and the effort needed 
to land contracts so strenuous that 
the vanishing point is now nearing, 
and profits to bureaus and salaries 
for talent are suffering a natural de- 


Greensburq, Ind., Co-Operative Independent Chautauqua—al! were present dur- 
Greensburg is still under the same man- 
agement that it was when patrons bought their tickets ten years ago. 


the sort that have pveen beneficiaries of the ab- 
normal prosperity that seemed to find its way into 
the chautauqua field early and rewarded even the 
most indifferent efforts with ample returns. 

The Mutual-Morgan Bureau, booking out of 
Chicago, reports that it already has more towns 
booked for its three five-day circuits than it had 
last season. 

Each of the five-day circuits will have a 
“Shepherd of the Hills’ company as the star at- 
traction. The Mutual-Morgan management re- 
ports that all three of these companies will be 
produced by the Wales Players and adds: “The 
Wales Players were ranked by The Billboard as 
the leading play producing company as graded 
on last summer’s committee reports.” 

On paper the Mutual-Morgan circuits certainly 
look stronger than ever. That the bureaus are feel- 
ing for a safer, sounder basis for their efforts is 


cline, 

Years ago the best agents were 
given ten per cent commission and 
a drawing account to take care of 
their expenses. Now this has 
climbed up higher and higher until 
some of the bureaus are reported to be averaging 
from 25 to 35 per cent as the cost of selling. 

A few weeks ago the manager of a Chicago 
musical bureau told the writer that he is now 
paying his agents $50 a week and _ giving 
them a bonus besides. This same manager at one 
time was able to hire agents on a small commis- 
sion, and they financed theselves while doing 
the booking. 


OGER W. BABSON was recently asked to tell 
what could be done to bring about a return 
of prosperity. He replied: “In seeking the 

way to better business let us all remember that 

periods of depression are caused by the extrava- 

gance, ineffciency and dishonesty that develop 

in the latter half of periods of prosperity, and 

that prosperity is caused by the thrift, efficiency 
(Continued on page 255) 


a:! 


CARRYI 


NE phase of outdoor music that makes 

such music a challenge to those who 

would attempt it ig its frequent diffi- 
culty. In carrying music into the open air 
man often has nature to contend with. That is, 
many of his best-laid effects go astray in the tricky 
acoustics of the out-of-doors. Man's ingenuity is 
taxed to remove these natural handicaps, but he 
is generally successful with the aid of sounding 
boards, amplifying devices and such. Neverthe- 
less the mere difficulty of the problem stimulates 
his imagination, for we do admire the perform- 
ance of the difficult—Dr. Samuel Johnson to the 
contrary. The philosopher was invited to listen to 
the performance of an intricate piece of music and 
was asked if he did not think the latter to be dif- 
ficult, “Difficult!” exclaimed the doctor. “Would 
to God that it were impossible!” 

Besides the advance in mechanical equipment 
the growth of open- 
air musie is due to 
the increased num- 
ber of agencies that 
are bringing it 
ibout. One of the 
most important of 
these consists of the 
summer chautau- 

ias, These some- 
Vhat beg the isene 
of acoustical prob- 
lems, however, since 
thelr tent setting 
Vittually supplies the 
acoustic qualities of 
an indoor anuditori- 
um. However, they 


do wonders in bring- 


Bs Kennetfr S.Clark 


period when the latter prefer to assemble out- 
doors. 

Another contributing factor is the wider de- 
velopment of open-air band concerts—thgt is, 
the expanding of them into something morg than 
an instrumental program. Band directors have 
been aided in the combining of community sing- 
ing with their concerts thru the availability of a 
collection of band arrangements for the vook of 
“Fifty-Five Community Songs” issued by GQ C. 
Birchard & Company of Boston. Bands are like 
tenors—they love to perform music in keys too 
high for the ordinary mortal. Such band ar- 
rangements of community songs in medium keys 
bring the instrumentalists within the tonal scope 


ing musie to the 
people during the 


of the man on the street. Such expansion 
of band programs has been brought about 
partly thru the opening of the eyes of the 
municipal park boards to the civic possibil- 
ities of such musical development. In many cases 
the park board has combined with some other 
local group, such as one of the business or- 
ganizations. 

An instance of this merging of interests is the 
musical campaign in Memphis, Tenn., where the 
Park Commission and the Chamber of Commerce 
are jointly responsible for a new spirit of com- 
munity singing as well as an instrumental de- 
velopment. These two agencies have brought to 
Memphis Arthur Nevin, a nationally-kKnown com- 
poser and director. The effects of this work have 
been so marked that a movement was lately on 
foot to establish a summer opera company in 
the open at the beautiful Overton Park. 


i commission- 
ers are also see- 

ing the wisdom 
of utilizing the city’s 
parks and_ public 
squares as the scenes 
of pageants in which 
the history of the 
town is told dra- 
matically to musical 
accompaniment. 
These pageants gen- 
erally mark some 
special occasion, 
such as one of the 
national holidays. 
For instance, some 
cities have presented 


& 
™ 
5 


f 


Historical pageant, “Cambridge Old and New,” during Old Home Weck at Cambridge, O., October 7, 1921. 


a simple form of 
(Continued on page 249) 


i 
1 


ez 
— —— — . yh 
e ae 4 a - 
' - ae | oe eo A Cae te 3 | 
ah : ; cilia ‘oe me e 
of 3 ae es _ 
ae Buns, . j ee : Ste 
a a Ps gs i eg oe see. . = a % 
. a ig et OL -_ oe fugt 3 oe Son. Zu bg! a fact < a ual ais Be a ; 
‘TEs > Eee E ae ee ¥ ee = ee Poe a * Ves ra 3 - jae 
ae (Fae : ” ae : $3 ; , SRP 
. = Wit ‘ t# Be «€ - ad $ " " 
o' ia a Crone oy Wn.” Te A , 
oy ie’ | oh fr 
ee j AE sated’ ’ ay : 
i ERAT ae - & 
a ee an Lec - E 
Oe eh Rene ae oor Bee ne : 
re tee ee eats ye Sea ee i ces , 
ee Ee ee ? - 
Fie yr swe. ay il cok hep ne. £ . t 
OS a sae: ¥ a 
MEI Ee de ae a ee arr mi J 
JP, ieee Mugg eo it, eee ? 
OPEB os Fah ae, ah iE ve ete : Se . 
BRAG RC a aon a ae ee “ps es, 
P=, a. ee ee oes i 
: 2 rine Sh ote ets 5 ii biet chgg H 
"eae initial ene iia iii a aeciinenssathiasesitiiiil ££ 7 
. 
it 
? 
~ 
_ 
if 
5 
4 
ee Se eee ee 4 
eat ieee eR : frat Poes are eae Soe eee eerie : Cae ees ce ae ue fea i #3 a ; 
set ij > : : bigs Ee : - E Passes i 
2a a ete : at _ 
. . ® = . See rh Hs ess SARE Eee pes is: * eis gtd Bae ; 
I 
a 
H 
a a 
oe 
4 : 
i 
ie 
| 
. Rowe g PN An aS ‘ Pog ; 
ra 7 Cae ta tp * lpar.-; > 2 ’ ay 2 a 3 7 1 oR , 
B cans EPS ae he i ESR ee 
‘at tee tee wart Wace Ae He 3. et pats y Ry ~ ay a 
pie iets ? Ny alt ee ae a to en a Ge geet eo : : 
BR a te nee a ~ ort Roa 2. aS | 
TPR ee noe 3 | 
Nera a | = ay % Pe : ts sabe ERS he ee | 
oa are. gets hanes . od eyige fa. La Fee | 
ne ae ae . Pl J Ree} ity. ‘ | 
NS att? are 2 . +m wee TERS . | 
AOS PS LS: x > eg ee en ee PENS Ske e,' ‘ Lo gieg 4 : 
os oe. - > ie Oe ee a, oe : YOR ha i 
BOO ee Sey @. * > Oay 3s ; : 
‘ rs 3 se” MESS *, e. o™~e pws / ee fate ~ q : Se cand a wy % 
ee os * * es. fie & -* a 2 ; > cra oat mm 3 ; a 
7 . . She . i 4 - oe . Fe RG 3 : 
7 de hone FR x gg " &§ 
i ut : . | — — —-—--=- : a po | 
a a 
1 § 
1 Pa : 
a 


» 


hoa > eae ven 


aia ip! 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


y Cvencan Iwstos Of Eopone 


WRITER'S NOTE—The following article may 
serve—in some measure—as recording a tribute 
to American inventiveness in a field that must 
necessarily appeal to every age and taste, A 
quarter of a ceniury of educa.ion and applied ex- 
perience in practically all corners of the mighty 
world of showdom has afforded opportunitics for 
the observance and analysis of the multi-diversi- 
fied types of amusement seekers thruout the old 
and new worlds and “the lands heyond the seas,” 
and, morcover, a fuller appreciation of the exten- 
sive sphere of demand for amusement device in- 
ventions that have won the approval of the 
American public. 


FAVORITE slogan of the late “Fred” Thomp- 


son—acknowledged wizard of the modern 
amusement park and creator of many 
unique forms of mental exhilaration identified 


with the ensemble of t! 
—was to the 


lat summertime institution 
effect that men and women are but 
“boys and girls grown tall’ and—given the ve- 
hicles to express an oct tbreak of re- 
juvenated childish propensities—eladly consign 
their work-a-day cares to oblivion in a manner 
that would have prompted the venerable Ponce 
de Leon to end his quest for the “Fountain of 
Youth” had he been so fortunate as to have 
lived in our time. 

It may be that this characteristic of the 
American amusement seeker of less tender years, 
unbending under the softening influence of the 
innocent joyousness and gaiety of a happy, laugh- 
ing amusement park throng, could be traced to a 
distinctively American democratic sense of humor 
and the more distinct in comparison 
with its lacking among other peo- 
ples—nowhere so marked as in 


sional ou 


Boy larry Je. tudor 


they are now fully established as standard attrar- 


tions thruout the European countries. The fol- 
lowing instance of the troubles of a pioneer in 
this form of entertainment may be amusingly 


interesting. 


T WAS in the early days of “The Cave of the 
Winds” side-show that an enterprising Anglo- 
American showman—the late William R. In- 
shaw, whose many friends hold him in beloved 
memory as one of the original Luna Park con- 
cessioners and a good fellow—conceived the idea 
of présenting that predecessor of the “Fun House” 
of today as an attraction of the famous Scottish 
amusement resort, the Glasgow Carnival. The 
owner of this extensive enterprise, the late George 
Green and one of the most prominent British 
showmen of his time, could scarce appreciate the 
attractiveness of a “dark and windy void” to his 
average Scottish patron, but finally consented to 
the innovation being installed, tho puzzled to 
realize that a disused donkey engine, a blower, 
several yards of canvas walling and a few lengths 
of tin piping could possibly provide for the sum 
total of internal fixtures of—as the enthusiastic 
Inshaw assured him—‘THE Greatest Laughing 
Show on Earth.” 

The art of the Carnival’s scenic artist produced 
a canvas representation of the Falls of Niagara 
with a cavern-like opening on each side as con- 
stituting, respectively, an exit and entrance and 


with a multi-colored sign to the effect that “The 

‘Cave of the Winds’ had (almost) occasioned 

millions of American men, women and children 

to laugh themselves to death”—and that the 
self-same “Cave of the Winds” was open for busi- 
ness in Bonnie Scotland to achieve a similar re- 
sult. 

A conference as to the admission charge for 
the sensation of “death by laughter” occasioned 
a little friendly discussion, Inshaw asserted that 
even the canniest of canny Scots would gladly 
invest six cents for the privilege, but the owner 
of the Carnival—in his practically experienced 
knowledge of the thrifty patrons—estimated that 
the equivalent of two cents in the current British 
rate of exchange would be more acceptable and 
yield larger returns—and with a proviso that the 
admission could be raised to 25c if the rush war- 
ranted that increase, 

The tryout opening was timed for a Friday 
evening. The weather was unpropitious and the 
crowd small. The donkey engine wheezed and 
grunted and finally consented to function and 
raise the all-essentilal wind. The listless sight- 
seers ambled about the extensive grounds with no 
particular interest in any attraction and with, ap- 
parently, “‘no place else to go.”” An opening cere- 
mony was dispensed with and Inshaw expressed 
his intention “of opening up” in a modest man- 
ner and as a rehearsal for the following night's 
rush of business. Something happened! 

Six revolver shots in rapid succession smote 
the still air and concessioners, barkers, stall at- 
tendants and patrons tumbled over each other in 
a mad rush for the Carnival’s exits. Police 

‘ whistles blew, some one rang for an 

ambulance—some_ said “Suicide,” 


Great Britain and continental Eu- 
rope, where traditional decorum is 
transgressed by any behavior trend- 
ing to “rompish” by those who—to 
uge the vernacular of the first-named 
nation—‘“are old enough to know 
better!” For this reason the pioneer- 
ing of even the more simple forms 
of American amusement devices in 
Europe discouraged those responsi- 
ble for innovations that failed to 
appeal to the respective European 
publics to a profitable extent, and, 
paradoxically, for the self-same rea- 
son of their success in the United 
Staies, viz.: The patrons had to laugh 
too heartily. 

Apart from the more strenuous, 
thrilling and lung-testing riding de- 
vices it was some little time before 
the average European amusement 
seeker could be educated to appre- 
ciate the humor of the American 
side-show principles—of the pure 
and simple laughter-raising types— 
but by a slow process of evolution 


others “Murder!” In a country where 
firearms are taboo and “Sullivan 
Laws” unknown there could be only 
one of two solutions of the mystify- 
ing occurrence. Gathering courage 
and headed by several brawny Glas- 
gow “bobbies” with drawn staffs, the 
crowd approached the location of the 
“Cave of the Winds” and which had 
been that of the source of the firing 
and found only the imperturbable 
Inshaw calmly loading up for a rep- 
etition of his unconventional “bal- 
lyhoo.” His finally assuring the 
police officers that his purpose and 
mission in Glasgow was to amuse its 
citizens rather than murder them 
prevented his arrest and decided his 
resorting to less alarming ballyhoo 
methods. That matter decided, In- 
shaw turned his attention to taking 
advantage of this unexpected result 
of his plans to divert the pecuniary 
interest of the Carnival patrons. 
Business was slow—too slow. Pros- 
pective patrons were too inquisitive. 
They wished to be informed as to 


Breezy Bracing Blackpool’s Famous “Pleasure Beach” 


Blackpool, Europe’s most famous summer holiday resort, enjoys the distinction of being the only large city in the world regarding amusement catering as its 
wmdustry and the manufacture of “human enjoyment” as serious a business as the greater industrial centers view the marketing of their respective products. 


Pleasure Beach, the most popular and outstanding feature of Blackpool’s myriad attractions, represents a striking illustration of the 


European taste for American amusements, 


evolution of the 


a 
. 16 ee 
1 Pe 
i 
ee 
- 
%, 
ee 
f —————— 
b 
} 
i} 
th 
a 
| oa 
ay 
ii 
ah 
* 
ery 
42 
i 
i 
aie 
; 1 
‘ 
| 
: 
a, 
# Yeh * . 3 
: be, oS <> fi ae 
| fo : \ f pe 
| | :  } . Aa 
| 4 1 4 : ‘ “8 rages He 
' i ; : 3 ae 
cn ec Ge ae 
| ~ be i" ie EP ag 
ne | el fe; | I ery - ep en F FB 
, See o> 1) armnammaet aha tt ES ne ans, 
| Lea Y ay UR ot 2. = ee eS, 
: ea be SF r-=- ] Be cca > miei mgs * Me Bes 4 
| a } Yd et 5 ri ¥ ‘ “saga “4 2 ts (Boney NN a — 
| (> iw 2 eo as ee ES ad 
re 4 . . Se Hi res “ee . eae a > ae ‘ S 
: 4 : 2 : ere: & Re “ om ee 4 
PMPs  @bear w o.4 
ih Wak. Dea *. 
4 @ ——_——e es aot” ne ig Sa 3 
 & ater ee 
ios ris 4 oa _>_ aa bead Bis a: ee é a 
gee - {| ll ’ ~ 
* i » 5 a ~ aa ‘. ag a a>, 
— hy he 
Ss si 4 Pie ok, mm i Zz Mes " ry A 
he | ; é SCE ear wre yy = j : : % eee r a 
afr - ali JUN > Koy ed ee: ‘ YY i! | i ; 1° Ail 
es] ' aS ‘ SS ie 5 xg 4 Uf fa eee we : 4 oF aed Pes j + c 
re rad cee i P: og | £7 &- jj : i Bos i. Call wh " 
« > A Bee we i | Yast ad “ip Se : oF a ib: 
se * te oe og > imenes ist 2 £F rs me ey % r ia hG.. re ae aot tit rr BENG Be ' , 
) a fF. FF eal Sn laa a Et ie Po es Da witty, oP a eee. 
: = | rn Md - 7 SMe” ~ 
us ee . , % | ” “ovr ke: a ig te Foe * cad 7 3 Sg: Se x 
: ¥ beets. is: : wer Le "< F Pee te iy bj ip * 7 yy eT, : fr? pees ¥e ' Z ee gine 2 3 sees yt * ; 
oe Wag a ee Pe ~ ” lore! "eee, ee , { %. ages a eee aes 
Ke wes ig Paes. fs ae 7 ae, meee Tim ee, Pa Le ee 2 SP pre peo Sa St ag 
» Pe Tae a te AY a te tae &, ag Se? oP ¢ For Be fh e a SH. ‘. ; = i Lu A we, + ey : . w. ae % 
BA re) eS AES eae pe ee emma | ee ‘a a7 eae a meen”: dae 
L r>, o . ae ee i Pee * > na “ id P a oy 4 4 
a es +3 A: PI ¥y ee! pee oe De we pee es nie < > —— N 
yas, TW ae se . oe a: ‘ 
. Ps Pinte y Owe Sig | Veo > 4 7 d ad ' : a: 2 
nnn a) We Pree 4. : 5 * Sx * W “ v Boel ' 4 4 al 54 a2 o 7 a g ' 
a r NS : Sei ©. Vi wa . m3 
a ” 4 a “ ee L “ beak : 5 P hy” 79 se *y "= ‘a ost an ah 
y ot Se Bat “o a ae —_——s . i. , Ao * a ~ = s x at gee = eo 2 res 4 
| — —— cil IR rc ee ye ew Se, gy 
; 
‘ 
‘ 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


17 


the complete program, the actual 
time of the raise of the curtain (7) 
and the general character of the en- 
tertainment that was promised to 
“make them laugh as they never 
laughed before.” The genial little 
showman’s assurance that ‘millions 
of American men, women and chil- 
dren had almost died,” etc., fell on 
doubting ears. Inshaw redoubled 
his efforts and assurances that those 
before him would forever after re- 
their resisting his blandish- 
ments to “have the time of their 
lives.” Success came at length with 
a more venturesome listener reck- 
handing the orator a two- 
cent coin and rushing into the 
cavernous opening. Silence fell and 
the crowd held its breath while the 
donkey engine wheezed and the can- 
vas structure throbbed with the 
roaring winds of Niagara’s caves. 
Ten minutes—and more—passed and 
the crowd speculated as to the fate 
of their daring fellow Scot—some 


gret 


lessly 


suggested that he may have lost his 
way, and others that he was going 
thru. an “almost-dying” process. 

He, however, emerged at the en- 
trance and asked Inshaw: “How long will you 
show be afore it starts, mister?’ and was en- 
couraged to return to the cavern and “enjoy him- 
self.’ It was an indignant Scotchman that rue- 
fully told the crowd that he had seen nothing 
for his money and that “the place was so draughty 
that he thought he had caught a chill.” 

Better success attended Inshaw’s efforts sub- 
sequently in traveling the English fairs and ex- 
periencing a broader appreciation of his innova- 
tion, tho at times the assistance of the police be- 
came necessary to explain that the show was for 
“lahghing purposes only.” Where the “windy 
passage” element is in fuil favor as a feature 
of the hundreds of ‘“‘Houses of Nonsense” now be- 
ing operated at the various European resorts, the 
respective national ideas of humor would seem 
to have changed with the times, 


THE GRAVITY RIDE 
British—and other European showmen gen- 
erally—had long resisted the temptation to ine 


The north entrance to the Casino 


troduce American devices, not by any means for 
lack of investing enterprise, but by reason of 
their experienced knowledge that—just as one 
man’s meat may be another’s poison—an uncon- 
ventional form of amusement device could be a 
dead failure in one country, tho an enormous 
success in another. The past few years have 
demonstrated that evolutionary character of the 
European amusement tastes and that universal 
education to accept American devices as enjoy- 
ment-promoting vehicles was a matter of time 
and enterprise. 

The late L. A. Thompson's introduction of the 
oldtime Switchback Railway in Europe was the 
first serious attempt in that direction, but met 
with little success. Mr. Thompson built and 
demonstrated the first installation in England, 
disposed of his patented interests, but the syn- 
dicate that acquired them became discouraged 
and abandoned its projects. The character of 
the structures, the absence of decorative effect to 
offset their gaunt and unwieldy appearance and 


ae the traditional distaste of the Euro- 

- peans to become individual objects 
of interest for a crowd accounted for 
the poor success of the venture. The 
“Canadian Toboggan” shared a sim- 
ilar fate. The famous ‘Earl's Court” 
of London originated ‘Shooting-the- 
Chutes’—built by Captain Paul Boys 
ton—in Europe, but lackadaisical 
London entered but indifferently ins 
to tha spirit of the exhilarating and 
thrilling diversion, 

At spasmodic intervals one om 
another of the milder types of 
American device inventiveness were 
introduced, but without marked su. 
cess. Several of our best known in- 
ventors and builders of amusement 
devices visited Europe, and here and 
again interested capital, but the tra- 
dition-bound Britisher, who  pro- 
verbially ‘“‘takes his pleasures sadly,” 
failed to realize that American 
vehicles of amusement would soon- 


er or later appeal to the risi- 
bilities of the European holiday 
maker and that only perseverance 


and co-operative effort could provide 

a solution of the apparent difficulty 

of enthusing and educating the pub- 
lic taste to the mental and physical recreative 
qualities of the devices famillar to the American 
joy-seeker, old and young. 


THE GENIUS OF BLACKPOOL 


: i= have changed during the past few years 
and the European amusement palate de- 
mands the newest and best that the in- 
ventive skill of the American device designer can 
produce. The creation of a _ vyast, distinctly 
American amusement park out of the sands of 
the South Shore section of Europe’s most famous 
holiday resort, Blackpool, on the West coast of 
England, has provided a “testing ground,” and 
devices and attractions that can carry Pleasure 
Beach’s “hall-mark” of approval are acceptable 
thruout Europe and the far-flung British colonies, 
and device builders who have been sufficiently 
farsighted to secure patented protection for their 
respective inventions have a wider field of de- 
mand than many realize for the exploitation of 
(Continued on page 258) 


a 


Te lovncen ienepenneT 


OW that the indoor celebration season of 
1921-22 is drawing so well along to the 
finale it would seem both timely and 

interesting to compare in a general approxi- 
mate way the activities and@achievements of the 
last six months with the score during the same 
period of the season previous and determine to 
the interested readers’ own personal satisfaction 
just about what progress, if any, can be noted in 
the advancement of this rapidly growing amuse- 
ment industry. That it has forged ahead this 
season is apparent with unmistakable clearness 
even to the most casual observer, and this is nat- 
urally most gratifying to the writer of this, who 
as far back as October 22 last, in these columns, 
was optimistic enough of the future outlook to 
venture the confident belief that the 1921-'’22 
Season's record of indoor events would totally 
eclipse any of its predecessors, numerically at any 
rate, if not in actual achievements, of which lat- 
ter conclusion he was cheerfully sanguine. It is 
& matter of actual record that this current season 
has already witnessed both of these eventualities, 
With the results of several very promising weeks 
f scheduled indoor operations still to be heard 
from. ’ 

In short, for convincing evidence that the 
indoor celebration industry has surely emerged 
from the shell of mediocrity and is now really 
well advanced on the up @nd up, one has only to 
scan the back number news and advertising col- 
lumns of this publication, where of indisputable 
mute testimony there is a plenty. The wonderful 
and splendid progress that surely has been made 
the season past in this particular fleld of endeavor, 
the advancement that so certainly has been post- 
marked along the route toward the things greater 
and more creditable and the signs in general of 
the ascendency of that which in geasons past we 
Were wont to term the indoor carnival or bazaar 


Bur larry Jf. Ronmelll 


to the higher and more elevated as well as elevat- 
ing plane of usefulness, cannot well be but most 
pleasing and encouraging to all who have a sincere 


Harry E. Bonnell 


interest and warm persona! regard for the 
things and events future prospective. 
“The advanced independent promotion.” 
What a world of import and meaning there 
is in that word “advanced.” It was used by that 
eminent firm of theatrical producers, Klaw & Er- 
langer, when they first launched their memorable 
big league vaudeville circuit a decade ago and is 
tnvariably employed wherever big men attempt big 
things. In this commentary review on the pro- 
gressive developments of independent promotions 
during the season now rapidly passing and the 
heights of worthy success that have been at- 
tained by the ambitious and energetic sponsors 
for the new and better movement the term fits 
in splendidly. 


HAT the real, live enterprising promoter of 

today, the fellow who saw fit to discard the 

ancient and obsolete methods of the yester- 
vear for the practical application of the modern 
Ways and means required to meet the constant 
change ef public taste and new conditions, has 
advanced his profession and calling, there is no 
room or reason to doubt, and that his progressive- 
ness has already been rewarded with the fruits 
of success is quite too well known a fact to admit 
of debate. One has only to make a brief mental 
resume of the splendid accomplishments during 
the last few months to realize the truth of this 
statement, and in every instance the really suc- 
cessful promotion, it will be found, has been of 
the “advanced” variety and type. By this classi- 
fication is meant a celebration under an auspices 
so conspicuously eminent publicly in reputation, 
influence and prestige, so potential in member~ 
ship strength and with such a high rating locally 
perhaps that aught but an event planned and 
staged along the most pretentious lines could 

(Continued om page 248) 


at = 
yt 
; Aue NT ee = 2 CEE —— Bee. 
ae | j 
. * Dt ee 4 . 
3 af ee t pS , ste i - * 
, mF J ap a ee 
ee 
¢4 a ee Oa eae Pe i ef ee. ea : 
' Tea oe: oe ae i 
i fi fe ¢ { ui ifn oe ; > ‘ 
; i a ob i. Be £ io JO, Oe. ba ; 2 
3 a 25 Dae es Re 6 ee r a 4 
steal me cee eM ie ae te: ee ae ies co : ey Mid a : 
; i : Zz : AB : aa eS % £ j 
= * 3 p & wey ~ a et 
Rous A", i ag eer sdf <% o sf ia t~ ew? Be wt és 
eset Wa ur ce, <P pe peo ioe ype somneP are BO 4 
ne ; y "i 7 a ee 
‘ eee ese in as Toe. lee ' 
pg : “44 i me F Peas Ss eas z 
nc tellcesasonrean : pst : sa een S'S. ' 
< e | 2 ~ | 2 ae ie ee ee ea } 
3 & Gia Fe q ! i a 7 & ete, wit poe } ee zig 
oe capella : ad ie se Pe 2. <i Wt grctiees hoe gee c > usa ee dies : 
- oe no ., ane” FE ee ER Mr se Prot siesta TR Oi tO euge 
a pret re ae. li Lt i aM gO gs Sa ae ee aw : 
24 Seco OO oe A Se Dg ee ee mee eg © es Ste &: eee Mer perpetiiciee = 
cil Ce sage et, PER EE Ge ee hoe ae tc a PE ieee” i 
.s * RE RN Eee Se ROO AE fe A a age 
= Sn a LE = Ee Ee eS eee ae Ben Gig ag hs ee ae an ra fog MONE a aii SPO 
ieee i Oe tn agg OS, eat Uae ad AM LEIS Ge, Pte es ; 
Ig So EO mee. * PO ee s 2 ig oA seek atts : ‘ % pes ee ee eg ; 4 
—_ « 
ee 
q 
: . 
; 
4 
i 
d 
Bi 
3 
7 
' 
EE 
— a : t 
Fie nes aE ee : Ps ' rs 
. 
i : ae 
3 ' 
. ; 
t 
i 7 
mS 
P 7 
. memeremeamantn Sc fo Ones ae | 
ay Ree ae RS Sees Bere BSS 7 
. Pen ~*~ eet so he sae a = a 3 23 ae ag i ‘ 
Sak ree. — 3 = meee SS 
Soa ey oy = 33 : : et 
Fm ae a : eek 
Tee eS ae Sa ie ots & 
Se ae os - 
neg - ae 
ee | a 
45% 7 ' 
7 _ ; ae % a Seed “ > x ss : 
— fo" ae 4 ; 
ee = —— ee ‘ 
“ eee a ae <4 
Ss a 7 i 
Bas eS SSE 
ty oe ; x eR Ree ad ‘ 
7 Re Be hc 7 
 . - : gg 
as YedS $ =_— 4 i 4 
= < si ie < Se Sas a 
— ce ; ee ' ; 
onli “ .= se s ae Se SS se ¥ ; 
BE SGT oe J a a ee ' 
x Sak. ay SS ; aes att ® aS ae Re a 
. eae Ss : : a ee a 
eS ae : Se ee Ge : 
Fa SS oe RF : PL SRS ee SES : 
Rae, SS hee FS 
~. - oe 
k 
i. 
SP i 
i 
t ' 
' ( 
— 


“The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


wpe R rns BS F : 
apn agian cl Oe tn me nlp = 


Pee 


Rain ad an 


SRS 
bs aac 


ee ae 


ee 


25c-COMPLETES THE LAMP DOLL-25c 


Our NEW PARACHUTE LAMP SHADE of best silk materials. These were used in the Aerial Department of the United States Government, and 
purchased by us fora song. This includes a wire frame and all, complete for 25c. Put a 75c Hair Lamp Doll on and you have the whole thing for 


about $1.15. In stores these retail for $2.98 to $3.98. On wheels or laydowns it is a knockout; 24-number wheel at 10c. 


GIVE AWAY A LAMP FREE EVERY TIME 


30c COMPLETES THE LAMP 


We sold 5,000 at 45c—now have reduced price to 30c. Our 
70-inch California Hoop, a complete Lamp, Shade, Coif- 
fure, Doll Dress, Doll Hat—all in one in our wonderful 
Hoop at 30c. 


17)5¢ 1922 SENSATION "“Sx2r5° DRESSES 


All colors, 30-inch Dress, Free Head Dress on all Dresses 
attached. Our price all season has been 23c to 28c. Now 
it is one price to all, 17Yec. 


FREE 


REAL OSTRICH 
FEATHER VAMP 


20c DRESSES THE DOLL COMPLETE | 


Forty-inch Hoop, in Marabou or Real Ostrich; all shades 
—100 different colors of every shade of silk. This is al- 
ways sold at 35c to 50c. OUR NEW PRICE, 20c. 


10c REAL ALL SILK DRESSES OF TINSEL 


WITH EACH $5.00 One hundrec sa oy pind a. - (no paper), 
wit ree ress—a or 
SAMPLE ORDER. $10.00 PER HUNDRED PER HUNDRED, $10.00 


OSTRIGH FEATHERS PICKED FROM REAL LIVE OSTRIGHES FROM OUR FAMOUS OSTRICH FARM 


23146 FEATHER VAMP 


Contains five Feathers for a Head Dress or Skirt. 


$1.00 - HELPS SELL LAMP DOLL - $1.00 


Complete Shade on wire frame, al] made of Feathers, and 
a small Skirt. Makes the Doll look like a million bucks. 


$1.00—PULLS THE TRICK—$1.00 


25c - BEAUTIFUL SILK LAMP SHADE- 25c 


Fifty different colors to every one hundred Shades. We 
have 2,000 on hand to clean out, so do not wait—it is a 
good investment if only to hold. 

Complete, All-Silk Shade, trimmed in Ostrich or Marabou. 


25c—OSTRICH OR MARABOU SHADES—25c 


CLOSED 


BUT NOT BY THE 


SHERIFF 


We closed our Factor- 
ies for five days to 
make these special ree 
duced prices. No fav- 
orites. Everyone gets 
the same prices. 


EVA TANGUAY STAR FEATHER DRESSES 
50c—COMPLETES THE LAMP—50c 


From 20 to 30 Feathers made into a Star, goes all over the 
Doll. ALamp Shade, Head Dress, Doll Dress and Coiffure. 


A KNOCKOUT ALL IN ONE 


Eva Tanguay knocked ’em dead on the vaudeville circuit 
this year with a Head Dress Stream of Feathers. Didn't 
you see her? Well, you can do the same with the Star 
Feather Combination on your joints, stands or show win- 
dows. 

50c—STAR FEATHER COMBINATION—50c 


LAMP SHADES AND DRESSES OF SILK 


Extra large cone or square shape, with wire frame, Lamp 
Shades and Dress to match. Assorted colors. Sold all 
season for 67%c to $1.00. Reduced price to all, 


60c PER SET—60c 


SEND $5.00 FOR SAMPLE LINE OF EVERYTHING WE HAVE COMPLETE. DO NOT WASTE POSTAGE—OUR SAMPLES TALK. 


A 


No. 15—HANGING TUB BASKET 
Sample, prepaid, $3.50 


CHINESE 
STAINED 
BAMBOO 

| BIRD CAGE 


aE Sample 
i Set of Three 
$4.00, prepaid 


= | 


Se 


No. 502 
DOUBLE-DECORATION BASKETS 
Sample 
Nest of Five, $4.25, prepaid 


5 A. CORENSON, __ 825 Sunset Boulevard, 


IMPORTER ~ MANUFACTURER 


119 Waverly Place -  - CHINATOWN. SAN FRANCISCO 


LOS ANGELES, CAL. 


No. 612 
14-INCH LEG BASKET 


OUR 1922 CATALOG NOW READY 
WIRE FOR QUANTITY PRICES 


—— it 
a wih Ik eee a 
4” ops 5) : i at x . 
ae a 
| Po 
4} 
ae 
i 
44 a 
ee ee | 
— EE — 
| ee 
| = 
| — a ee 
a ——<—<—<—<—_—_—_— | 
) ee 
— _ se 
i PC 
. ee 
m °C = 
Hi : Ni ES E ‘ ; oe 
| a nee - 
. if bee ; wes 
| pa FS | 
eee A 
BASKETS 3 
Ci Pe PS a oe _* Ng 
tS Bee. a 
| Q) se, 0. cy ia3 —— 
i > ee ee ei eee ee ff > “h 
- Pe i us , tees - Se aa des te > uP ; i —e hae A gah No. 303 
: oe e er See ze if i a “e * Ph ee ~ DOUBLE-WEAVE BASKETS 
DC eee ae mene 
7 . 4 He Zs 1 ae Nest of Three, $3.75, prepaid 
eo. .£ ) ms 
d ee 
Aa} 
ae 
Y  § ai } ) ; DOUBLE 7 
EE &oon i oe eae 
ig NAR Lt, ne | pe | WA MENT | : 
mr *Srangias i Fe | lL i +l ot BASKET [am rhe 
: ' HET! > 2 ¥ wy ¢ : . Si = r f ' 
i 4 . re } os m ie { a3 
Ht | et “= ss} we $3.75, prepaid ar . 4 
2 ha aciieete BD Fes | 
em A 
— Ss 
‘ 


MARCH 18, 1922 The Billboard 


WANDELL’S 


Fair, Carnival and Park Packages | 
SEASON 1922 


Miss America Chocolates | 
The Largest, Finest Half Pound Boxes in All the Big Round World 


| MISS AMERICA Liquid Cordial Cherries - $3.25 a doz. | 


16 Pieces—White Box 


MISS AMERICA Assorted- - - - - - $2.85 a doz. 


| Big Half Pound—Blue Box 


| MISS AMERICA Assorted Nuts - - - - $2.85 a doz. | 
| 


Big Half Pound—Pink Box 
| The Miss America Boxes are 10!4 inches long and 614 inches wide. Packed Five dozen in Fibre Case 


Half Pound Picture Boxes - - - - = - $2.85 a doz. 


Three Subjects. Size, 1134 inches long and 5 inches wide 


Big Six Ounce Short Play Package- - - + $2.40 a doz. 


! 
| 
Size 714 x 444. Packed Cne Hundred and Twenty in Fibre Case | 


Wonder Two Layer Boxes | 
One Pound Two Layer Box - - - - += $6.00adoz. | 


Packed Four dozen in Fibre Case 


Half Pound Two Layer Box - - - - = $3.25 adoz. | 


Packed Seventy-two in Fibre Case 


These are probably the handsomest boxes and finest Chocolates ever sold to the Concession Trade. We guarantee 
every pound to contain twenty different centers. High class wonderful goods, beautifully pack: 


Splendide 


Chocolate Varieties Wandell—All Hand Dipped 


The Big - Glad - Red Package, Two Pounds (WaNc8")- $ .80 


Designed to Retail for $2.00. Packing, Twenty-four Boxes to Case 


Three Pound Picture Tops, All Girl Subjects - $24.00 a doz. 


Wonderful Flash 
Five Pound Picture Tops - - - - = - $36.00 a doz. 


ALL PRICES ARE F. O. B. BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 


—_ 


—~ 


| 

{ We haven’t a Chocolate Dipping Machine in our factory. We never will have. We don’t believe in them. 
LOOK HERE * Every piece of Wandell’s Chocolates is Hand-Dipped by good-looking girl labor in delicious high grade | 
| Chocolate. Our Cherries are True Liquid Cordial Cherries, Bon Bon Dipped by Hand, and Chocolate Dipped by Hand. We guarantee | 


every package of our goods to be filled with delicious, High-grade Hand-dipped goods as fine as any in the World made anywhere at 
any price. Come on, let's do business together. 


SERVICE! Every Boy and Girl in this Factory is trained to ‘‘Jump’’ when the **Wire” arrives. No matter where you are— 
* North, South, East or West—wire us and then we and the old Express Company will do the rest. 


| — WANDELL CHOCOLATE CO. 


SPECIALISTS IN HAND-DIPPED CHOCOLATES TO THE CARNIVAL AND CONCESSION TRADE | 
} 
7 BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 


—= 


| 18a 2 
} _ 
\ l} | 
| i  § 
} ; | 
| re | 
| | — 
| i : 
it — 

| ee | 
i] | 
| | ‘ 
H &§ 
| | 
| _ 
“a 
rs Zz 
| | , 
| sa acne tapmeamenmennmmerameee emma | :_ 
| P 
iz 
| a 
_ 
i @ 
re | ; 
ee | 
; 
BS 
| q 
i 1 : 
: 
a | 
i} : 
y 
i] ; 
| | «= 
S ——SS——————————— ee - 
7 . 


ee 


18d The Billboard MARCH 18, 1922 


SQUATTING SQUAW & DANCING DOLL 


4 Patented and Copyrighted By H. KH. Tammen Company, Denver, Colorado 
| THE SQUATTING SQUAW SQUATS OR DANCES AT YOUR WILL aS 


lex5'T’S a red-blooded Indian doll, colorful, wearing regulation [n- 


* 
cb 


i us dian clothes, headdress and an Indian blanket, just as if it Z | 


co pene ET gest 


were born on the plains. Every doll is different; they are no 
\{*5| relation except that they are Indians. Not a sawdust doll, butg 
one that grown-ups as well as children will play with. Serv- q: 
iceable and hard to destroy. It belongs te the Skookum rm 
family of Bully Good Indians. \ai 


It is different from any kind cf doll that you have ever seen or 2 
heard of. You must have a sample in order to realize the difference ( 


wet ae an awe 2 engae* 
SESE ae 


TERRES ee ee 
= 
a 


* 


between this doll and those that have been put on the market in the 
last century. 


a 
o Ge 
Sad 


/ . 4 
igi , 
~74y 
‘ , 
; ~."* . \ 
| . 
f .* ie) 
} he \ . 
j . > | ! 
peers \ \ | 
ty © \ 
s ® 


eI 


The picture shown is simply an idea as 
gan to what the dollis. Its real size is 91 inches 
4 tall, dressed. We will send you a sample 
SA for 50c post paid. You should really send 
= 4 for two samples—cost One Dollar—because 

mx each doll is so different. 


paanapeatttne 
mee 6 Ih 


— > 


‘ After you have seen the sample and you determine in 
Se what quantities you can use them, we will be glad to quote 
i te you price on lots ranging from 100 to 5,000. No Indian 
4 doll has ever been made or sold at our price, you will agree, 
m_ when you get the sample with the full particulars. 


4a We specialize in Indian dolls and sell 
me, at wholesale only. We are the largest man- 
ufacturers in the United States of Indian 
dolls, moceasins, pennants, pillows and un- 
usual novelties. We make one thousand 
Sand one different articles. Can execute 
any idea that you may have and will be 
am glad to quote you prices. 


\ 

EXTRA: We are now making an en- <3) 
tirely new fan, “The Fan of Hearts,” looks {) 
SS) 


at 


for 25 cents and will quote you prices in 


any quantity that you may suggest. Re- 


like a dollar—made in three styles. We will N @) 
dl @) 
} 
member, these are entirely new novelties. S 


send you free samples (one of each style) 
“Tne 
2 
: -~ = 


We make no slum goods—everything is first-class. It may cost a 
penny more, but there is no waste, no grief, no come-back, 


~ 


a 4 ALWAYS ADDRESS— > aa Its patented and copsrintied. “stringers 
ie Infringers 
Beware! 
be a es a a Bg ae a —<« | . ] if : | e? a ot. BY These 
Ma, Age 7 US Lelie — 
ots sa Ri it x , = ae GG ~] Dolls Are 
“ee ESTASLISHED 1061 a 
—_ TS Gye w~ * Copyright 
All Rights 
Corner 17th and Larimer Streets, Denver, Colorado|  *""" 


= } ——————————————————————————— ———————— ee 1 
ee ———— | 
> | 
_ a's," 

ES le LIE 
Bs abe hae 
Se OS 
gg K f Dan Hit : 
iH “4 AVE gy Cl 

“4 , ery q ' 
| | é 

Ha ot MY 
dl ae 


MARCH 18, 1922 The Billboard | 18e 


Y, 


uene's 1927's “HORN OF PLENTY” For vou: 
MR. CONCESSIONAIRE! | 


: The World’s Greatest “Automatic Base Ball Player’ 


THE FASTEST MONEY GETTER EVER CONCEIVED 


FOR FAIRS, PARKS, CARNIVALS, BEACHES AND ALL AMUSEMENT RESORTS 


SN 


SAQAARRAAAAR AS 
QA 


“Fortune 
Knocks / 
Once at 
Every 
Man’s 
Door.” 
This is — 
YOUR 
Oppor- 
tunity!! Be _ 
One of the 
First To 
Install This 7 
Sweeter? eg - 
Y ’ : “ - i Game. 
ee | ee I Prosperity for 


Today! be Calli 


SAM CRANE, the world’s greatest baseball authority and writer, said in THE NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL: “Here is a great 

ball player!” THE POPULAR SCIENCE MAGAZINE featured our game on its front cover, and said: “Our apparatus provides for EVERY- 

Z THING in baseball, except derisive howls from the bleachers.” And we also say: “WHY did these unquestionable authorities endorse The Strike- 
G Out King?” BECAUSE: The game has merit, fascinates and excites! BECAUSE it appeals to the masses and classes! BECAUSE it has a 
4 stop, watch AND PLAY atmosphere! BECAUSE baseball is the world’s greatest sport, and because nothing has ever been invented to any- 


~ Each Unit 
_ Takes in 


Hour. 


\S WN 
QQ 


KG|_|C|__EOEEE 
RWQVq 
WA 


» 
WV 


SSS 


. Five ina 

_ Row Means 
$30.00 an 
; Hour. 

— What 

~ Could 

Be 


\ 
MAG 


AQGQ 


SSN 


B™DB?¥$~+3IVVQQ 


S 


Wy 


SS 


WOU 


\\ 
S 


\N 
SSS 


ANOONONN ANA AAAS NAAR 


YY where nearly equal it. CAN YOU IMAGINE the picture three life-size, fully uniformed figures make? CAN YOU IMAGINE the public (they Yy 
A are the pitchers) trying to strike out the batter? CAN YOU IMAGINE a player throwing three strikes and seeing each strike and ball register yy 
automatically? CAN YOU IMAGINE the thrills the public get when, after pitching a strike, the umpire raises his hand, a bell rings, the ball Yy 

Vy has been caught and it registers everything automatically? 6 Balls for 5 Cents. Money is put in slot machine, each unit occupies little over 4 Uy 
GY feet in width. NO ELECTRICITY, NO MOTORS, NOTHING TO GET OUT OF ORDER. ONE MAN CAN TEND EIGHT UNITS. Portable WY 


Yb 
Y 


Y) for Fairs. Can be installed anywhere. Terms arranged to suit. Address THE STRIKE-OUT KING CORP., McCreery Bldg., 64-74 W. 23rd Street, 


SSS 


yy Corner 6th Avenue, New York City. WM. R. MEYERS, Manager. y 
Si eee aaaamaa_a_auwbwWhWWWw hho D0. 


ETNA A QQ SS CCX ACE Oo W WH RRR QOS ORE a idm PMO ROS S96 
QQQ{G_ MP SS SX QQ OW QQ A QI MQ A XQ@GCQO@ A OAHR—ORUCCO!\NM_ \\ SS WW Q@ SY | ; 
y AAG AAS ARK AANA AYA Aaya qrvrn»«»«»«q» Xi Gc DCC QQ QQ QQ YY SONY ian 
1 
, Z 4 
yy YY p -! 
Uy 7) 
Vij G} i 
2 Y Hy 
Y aa 
yy | i 
ee 4 | . | 
Yj, Y : 
YY “. 
UY} k y - 
WY; y SIRES atest ae tee ete eecettagte aate eatt eee sbte eteecentlscanctenntentehteentenhtentcontcontoctoaenege nt aa NS 1 er 
Uy, iv iosseneegae Bo ooh Soa aaa : ss cena Sloe Sn Soy N - Z : 
Y, ee Le ~ Y 7 
Wy : eS Sea Y N 
Y B  csSreeegegasesspmie seuss sennSSsiio 0S neg OOS NOSSO SS cae anne El . y 
Yy , RUM ON NI a I ON NOR ee Ae A im ON SO OO TON ON Sg NNT NS RS 
4 aia Sa ae oe are eae pe IRE | Z _ 
Up Sas ; SRNR EN CORO REL OR OBES DAO Brn OR RRS ; ZY 
Y/; See NS ee ae ee Z ; 
Yy SI Sere eae reggae ae Sener pete ioe if Oy i= ' yy 
Y/; PR Si: Cg Ne ee EN MNS HS Y, 
y | “™ Tia es eo UR ee eee ues 4 nt \ / | 
Y BR is teen ede SSS Se SS SS Se eee eee tama Y 
Y, fh N S ny ee ee ere a es. Oa: y SB 7 Seo See a Soe OER : be Yi ; 
Gy ' Y ) BS SR: Re Sa os a a eet OP ee gee Oa Pei: en Sano. es Rie meee ANS NN SBR: ; ) Y : 
YY | N Be: eR ROS SR Sag a OE a a oe core ie Satie Ro Se: SOS > ie Sh YY AN > jp-4 Y : 
Y d INS BS 4 ; Se i Se a we. goreatoets es preteac re ie, a rs y PASAY TAY X ; AA ] Y ; : 
Uy “Oh. Be FEEL sresBocguangpieeet soon noc ee soma SOO Cet arto cat a cease ae SOUR RRR RES | Me Siri 4 Yj, 
a LR Be if SRO ROOTS PO I 9 NEN nes Se ay SAO hee OO RARER Pi Cp {J Yi 
Uj, S cs } 5 — rs Aa aD agit, AO, Sb A AM ea casa, a dia a mm meme caren Ae ANS APERS 2 ZG 
Yj Ssr % i} RAK FSO ST RRSETL SS ee a GAO Se SANZ OY SOL STLALISIS i atikiticcyy Ae j 27 Yy, : 
YY VOI BRS SONEORORROL eI, iianisrits BLS5 YY ; 
Yj SS I RRA ROR SOR POOL Ke | MACS RANE | OY? YY _ 
YZ as KS KKK ROSE SRLS PREZ SEE L KES / Re aes NSPS ROR ERE SESE RE oO j Ybp 2 
q 
: 
im 
7; 
j : 
a 
t 
§ 
4 ; ' 
! 
. 
; Z . 
Uy ayy = 
Y YY A 
Uy ; 
| 
2. 
ye 
z.. 
Z 
: é 
' : 3 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


Sth Annual Tour Season 1922 


L. J. HETH SHOWS 


S BIG DAY Season Opens in the heart of E. St. Louis, IIl., 8 BIG DAYS 


Saturday, Apri! 8th, under strong auspices. 


Presenting a magnificent array of 15 high-class Amusements and 5 big Riding Devices. Will positively play a tour of 37 weeks under high-class au- 
spices, together with a circuit of 12 of the best Fair Dates in the South. 


Have opening for Society Circus or any other high-class Show that we can feature. Will furnish beautifully hand-carved double wagon front. 


Want experienced Chorus Girls that can lead numbers, Plantation Performers, Talkers and Grinders, Cabaret Dancers. Man who wnGeastands 
Cushman Engine and can operate same. All Legitimate Concessions open. 


Fair Secretaries and Auspices desiring a line of high-class Attractions, communicate with us. Address 


L. J. HETH SHOWS, P. O. Box 27, E. ST. LOUIS, ILL. 


| | KEYVA NDESTRUCTBLE PEARLS 


t 
i A Necklace of Indestructible Quality 
| 
. 


, ' The Charm of the French Pearl 
' 


Beautiful Country of France, the source of art 
and beauty for the universe, is the home of 
LaTausca Pearls. It was here, many cen- 
turies ago, that the first pearl made by the 
hand of man was shown to the world, and 
the wonderfully skillful craft of pearl making 
has grown in Paris as nowhere else. So when 
We say that LaTausca Pearls are of French 


} : F _ ere es Pees 
| = " Origin, that means all that need be said. The Th t d 
; ) spirit, the soul of France, is breathed into every LaTausca Pearl. Each ane ea es an Sh Oy 
; has that indefinable CHIC which is definitely French. And of all the 
wonderful creations which are Paris’—none is more wondrous than La- 
| ~ Sensation In Years 
; a a 


Tausca Pearls. 
A strong bright colored Kum-Back Ball—five inches 
in diameter, seven,good pieces of wrapped candy inside! 
Strong heavy return rubber. When candy is re- 
moved the ball is still a lasting toy. 
Kids are going crazy over them! 


THIS IS A NEW ONE—GET IN ON IT NOW 


7 30MIS TOM OU 
Lasts long after candy is forgotten! Q) — 


This novelty is now being sold by jobbing confec- 
tioners. It is going like wildfire all over the country. 
A wonderful concession novelty. In amusement 
parks, fairs—concessions, with someone to demon- 


strate—thousands can be sold. A tremendous value 
for the money. 


eae 


: at : Packed in cartons of 50 balls each. Price, $3.10 per 
NOTE THE REMARKABLE LOW MONEY SAVING PRICES carton. 
18-in. Lonath, patented PieGrenccseselersceserecesovesoes ee MRED I ay Age to all points of on 10 oF 
t -in. engt ra uate tring eee ee eee eee eee ee eee eee eee reer se) . 
: 30-in. Length, Graduated, String eoreercaceececs eet eres eeeteee 8.00 TERMS—25% with order, balance C, oO. D. 
Add 50c we Single String. 


EACH AND EVERY STRING GOLD LABEL TAB ATTACHED ‘The Sykes & Thompson Company 
: BOSTON BAG COMPANY, Incorporated CLEVELAND 


Manufacturers and Importers . 
76 Dorrance Street, - . - PROVIDENCE, R, 1. 


CHEWING GUM 2 222° 2% 2 spectatty satesmen affords the 


greatest opportunity to make money during the 
coming season. Think of it! Standard Attractive Packages of CHEWING GUM, 
3. J. STEBLAR, Mor, RUSSELL W. START, Gen. Ast. J. F. GILLICE, Asst. Mor. 


in all the choice flavors. Price per 1,000 packages, $13.00. Remit money order. 
STAR LIGHT SHOWS [icons cones 


REEDY BROS. GUM CO, . . 113 S. Jefferson Street, Chicago, Ill. 
FOURTH SEASON 
WANTED—Three more STIOWS. iis i 


BANTER ree ere HOWE, Sea fae et wed, dome ere, Foetal Mawen Wanted ALL KINDS OF ATTRACTIONS 
pleakets, Car ady. Ho pT, « at, Ball Game. Doll Ball Game. All others open. Show opens Apri} 15th SHOWS AND CONCESSIONS 


Two Saturdays. I own my own three Rides. This show moves 
every week, (No Grift.) J. J. STEBLAR, Manager, Room 501, 1431 Broadway, New York City, N. Y R THE we, ESLESRATION AT THE DRIVING PARK. DUBOIS, PA. 
* Also for the Big’ Pair, Sept. #22. Address all communications to A. AIL, Driving Park, Dubois, Pa. 


MORE FLASH 
"i icanvup |GET THESE NEW DRESSES|"S.0G""|| ps MES 
T f N S E L A N D LA C E Millinery and Pony Plumes 


We wish to call your attention to 4 


line of imported French Millinery and 
Pony Plumes which will increase the 
flash of your store wonderfully. For 


the live Concessionaire _. — 
the biggest and best flashed up store 
THE SEASON’S TWO BIG FEATURES on the midway these Plumes will 
Trimmed in tinsel and lace embroidered center. Tinsel and Millinery Plumes the big bet. Wire hoop, elastic | SUrely do the trick. They come in 
center, double paper thruout. Will not rip or tear. This improvement is worth your while investigating We | different sizes and lengths and as- 
have added these features for your, and not our, benefit, as the prices have been reduced on all our Dresses. Our | S0Tted colors. As we cannot send _— 
present line consists of 9 different styles of Dresses, viz.: Millinery Plume, Tinsel and Lace, Silk Marabou, Paper | fee samples, we would advise plac _ 
y Marabou, Silk Tinsel and 4 different styles of Silk ‘Crepe Paper Tinsel Dresses, ranging in price from 8c and up. | ® Sample order of from 1 to 5 dollars 
Write for circular and price list. Prices mailed upon request. 
BADGER TOY CoO., - - 600 Blue Island Ave., Chicago, III. 


Phone, Haymarket 4824. MORE FLASH—MORE MONEY 


aS: es —E 
pit 
} 
! 
| 
i} 
i §P,. CANDY ZSS\ KUM-BACK 
hoctee ry ear ae 
Gs eS seats Mg 
eo ae 
| Bi 2 Oy 
| et ae a 
‘ail | 7 


MARCH 18, 1922 , The Billboard 


- ea NEW CATALO 
cy : Jine. (i aoe ; 
Se NOW READY 
PON ad ed Send for your copy. 
Only one house can have the lowest 


prices. We are going to leave you 
be the sole judge of who that is. 


-_ 
4 iia 
ba loc 

UN A SF 
fs LONG deter cate Late beh 


The largest assortment of Imported Our second year in business and we feel we are entitled to call ourselves 
and Domestic Beaded Bags nee neianes Supply House in the United States, based on the 


in the country lst—We have never disappointed any customer by not having his 


supplies reach him on time. The stunts we have pulled off to do this 
would make an interesting book, but we are too busy taking care of our 
CHASE ROBES BEARS customers to write the book. 


2nd—We h ificed li Il at the pri do. M 
BEACON BLANKETS ALUMINUM BUCKETS @ of she ane listed pene meant tg 7 a paceman a pis 
FOR FRUIT AND mately the same prices. But in order todo so, they have been compelled 


to lower their standard of quality. 


ESMOND BLANKETS GROCERIES 3rd—Our large volume of business permits us to operate on a small 
margin of profit, you getting the benefit of the lower prices. 
SILVERWARE DOLLS 


4th—All the items we sell are carried in stock in tremendous quanti- 
ties, insuring immediate delivery and no substitution. 
q * 5th—The high personnel of our staff, of which Max Goodman is 
Bicycle an d “ R u mp fs” Baltimore a prominent factor, means that you always get intelligent and fair treat- 


ment and co-operation. 


Wheels. Most combinations YOU ARE ENTITLED TO THE ABOVE 


always in stock SERVICE FROM ANY HOUSE YOU DO 
BUSINESS WITH—IF YOU ARE NOT 
GETTING IT, TRY US, AND YOU WILL 
NEVER REGRET MAKING THE CHANGE 


FAIR TRADING CO., Inc., © Pann's NEW YORK CITY 


MAX GOODMAN, General Manager MORRIS MAZEL, President 
4 Long Distance Phone, Stuyvesant 2675-8738 


LIPAULT'S ASSORTMENTS C. E. TAYLOR CO. SILVERWARE 


EE TEL IE Sm 


+ 
’ 


Se 
2 * . 


No. 37---4-PIECE CHOCOLATE SET 
$3.00 EACH 
NOTE THESE REMARKABLE PRICES 


—S #S 

SS No. 10—Genuine Rogers 26-Piece Silver Set.............. $3.00 
No. 38—Giiver Fruit Bowl)... .ccccccccccccccccccccccccccece 2.00 
No. V2400—PREMIUM ASSORTMENT pe eee ere 1.75 
Consisting of 23 high-grade, flashy and attractive No. 54—Handsome Silver Fruit Basket......... tanaaaeak 3.00 
articles, complete, with 1,800-Hole Salesboard. No. 80—Silver 5-Piece Tea Set..........cccccccccccsccccs 450 
PRICE, $25.00 No. 60—Handsome Silver Electric Lamp...........-+.-+. 3.00 
Send for complete Salesboard Premium These articles are just a few of the very many we have to 

Assortment Catalogue. offer at rock bottom prices. 


IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT 


CONCESSIONERS and CARNIVAL MEN—We are very glad to inform you that we are the PHILADELPHIA REPRESENTATIVES and DIS- 
TRIBUTORS for the C. E. TALYOR CO., the originators of the Famous Silver Wheel. A full line of handsome, attractive and showy Silverware, 
Manicure Sets, La Tausca Pearls, Cameras, eic., is now on display at our handsome show rooms, No. 1028 Arch Street, Philadelphia, where we are 
ready to quote you the most attractive prices you have ever had. Orders will receive the usual prompt and efficient attention that are customarily 
given by the C. B. Taylor Co., and which the Lipault Co. are famed for. 25% deposit on all C. O, D. orders. Be sure and look us over. A complete 
catalogue now ready of the C. E. Taylor Co. merchandise. Write for a copy. 


LIPAULT COMPANY, Dept. B, 1028 ARCH STREET, PHILADELPHIA 


ee 


er 


ee 


ee & ze | 
SS SSS ry ‘ 
—_——- reer i 
. » 
. . ~ 
‘ 
: 
4 ; 
7 | y 
(G _ ‘ 
| ‘' 
, / : 
- ; 
- = 
ii 
\ 
nel ‘\~ ; 
ri ard q ¥ 
IN gba 
3 - re : : | 
i 
_: , 
| 
! 
; i 
| - 
b 
: 
7 
i. 
a — = \ 
=) 
_ | 
> 4 
| j 
4 
4 
| of 
i 4 
i : 
‘ . 4 
het Sd . Pa a ae NT 
ee > ast Fos : Cees, : a q 
eis ee ae , Ah om eri) > =° ys) 1 
pnd mess + “She: : eS ae Ae *4 kos Ne 
3 be BS: ee pie we ee o a es “oh ee cae: rid a ux ap tits. Se : 
. . a. oe ag eee io bs i Fs Poy * ey ed : 
‘ Pr a 2 2 3 OS Ge jes HE es f +: RFC Saree 4 Ty. : 
oe I RRS Foe, nie’ eens » Yaa % | 
ae » SS Qs eS a ee ve tae i 
Prem mee, Be se gS BP PR ie SR ee eames 2 £ . oe 
s Sas Oa mar ek Se Po . pt ee x > .2 : ; + % 
ot Ca pe Ca is ee eg tes ‘ eyes pees i 5 as ot Poe oh By < a & 
., act teen a pe ka ear > hy a eet : 4 tr aes ; } Coe ae 
‘Seley . ee Sete | Rae ~, Bees 2 A oe! ry 
ERS = > hee re x * Fait ADs a = 
oh.” See Pas. . ¥ na + i ERR Sy eer - 
34 5 ‘ > . . mh. > PP Ps \ 
—_ th: at, ‘ _ a Petes net io oe lated Fy : 
e i oe Re a rs * ra Pe Pe eee Ee 7 
: , ‘ eee Oe a ‘ i 
. : “2° a ‘a ee ae oe 
. ‘ a Be a Sed! at os e . 4} a] ae an 
9 Peereniimecencanentt | tal Ye. aes Pe ae 
5 ii » & Cea Be Sat rs FS 
: BER a a e , 4 Be ms Als ee 4 ieee a aad a \ : ; 
~~ = : = = , ee “EE oe ae Eg Res, ae -. R : 
> a : is > - . a oe 2 ee. * pits LAs 2 ee . =e “ 4 
( poe eo) ie ii la J ‘ ™ oi > ‘ye a one Yay iiS a , ee 4 
i ‘ . he. Bete , . eS 7 a nee Ain nt Sat ee) PP a\ Be a ' 
{ V = j - “Mi “4 es ‘a z a a fae Pepi 5 ey /* 2 si ~ort ee 7 
o a Fj ‘ ee Ve: * Ss j x 5 * i hag J ie aS ne 
ce 2 ' ° , ‘ ag Fe ¥ OS hee RS a. 
: j ae + sl aoe ae ‘be bo boa a} 
. > ? S — NY : 4 as 43: £ oe cy ¥. eae | 
mm / 4, ** ae a S. ee j~< SS ae r re 3 
iS — i Ser anys, 2 ty _ he Sa 
ay Bee BR pe et 
Tie, 2 EN RS OE A ee _ . 
. ae Pe RY Tee See Py ats 
A ay Z YS ae Kes . » 
af . Was Rent eae Oe tf “ay ag = ‘ 
. $ SF ee ae. KP a aN FSS 
® ak es Da Sten Picks ’ ope SES i . 
~\ Wee Me ee CO ae ae 
or, i To Setar | aah eae ey S = 
o. . Se ’ ts nS AL ee. § : 
Pg hoe asia aS a Roe Be i ag al ; : 
ae, ~ eke ~ ah wo G “ 3 
“ie cae. aa Pees ae at - e . 
: XN 
ee § 
ee : 
‘ . : | 
. j 
Se 
a 


1 an The Billboard MARCH 18, 1922 


—_— 


Showmen and Riding Device Operators 


The Berni Organ Company 


Is Now Owned and 
Controlled by 


WILLIAM H. DENTZEL and 
C. F. SHELLENBERGER (SHELLY) 


OUR BUSINESS IS BUILDING 
AND IMPORTING BAND ORGANS 
WITH CARDBOARD MUSIC 


We ave Selling . for Rudolph Wurlitzer Mfg. Co. 
Military Band Organs and Music 


REPAIR AND REBUILD ORGANS OF ALL KINDS 
Showmen and Parkmen are invited to make their headquarters with us when in New York. 


216 West 20th Street, New York City 


COME, SEE ORGANS ON DISPLAY IN OUR SHOWROOM 


GENUINE | 


COWHIDE BOSTON BAGS 


OUR No.7 


INVENTORS, PATENTEES & MANUFACTURERS 
STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS AMUSEMENT DEVICES 


OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 


$1.25 Each 


IN QUANTITIES OF 50 OR MORE 


Suitable for (Stationary or Portable) operation in Europe, Latin-Amer- 
ica, Australasia, South Africa, The Orient, the Far and Near East, etc., 
etc., are cordially invited to communicate with 


HARRY E. TUDOR 


i Sample sent upon receipt of } 


$1.75 IMPORTER AND EXPORTER OF AMUSEMENT DEVICES 
PLACE YOUR ORDERS EARLY Headquarters: European Office: 
SO AS TO INSURE PROMPT West 8th St, 91 Shaftesbury Avenue, 
DELIVERY ; CONEY ISLAND, N. Y, LONDON (W.1), ENGLAND. 
Cables: Cables: ; 
“Amusements. New York.” “Tipunifilm, London” 


All our BOSTON Bags are made as illustrated 
above, with a good lining and one large inside ) 
pocket. Two heavy leather handles strongly 
stitched and riveted to frame. Is closed with 
one-inch double leather and stitched strap 
and one-inch brass roller buckle with leather loop. 
The strongly constructed bottom .is strongly 
stitched and still further reinforced with large 
brass STUDS. 


BOSTON BAG COMPANY, Incorporated 


MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS 
76 Dorrance St., PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


(Member National Association of Amusement Parks) 


SHOWMEN OF ALL NATIONS! 


Park and Resort Operators, Carnival and Street Fair Proprietors and 
Concessionaires afforded STRICTLY RELIABLE information concern- 


ing any and all amusement devices and the suitability of such to meet 
their respective requirements on request. 


EUROPEAN DESIGNERS OF DEVICES 


purposing negotiating American exploitation on royalty, manufacture or 
“sell-out” basis are recommended to correspond. 


Address HARRY E. TUDOR, West 8th St. Coney Island, New York. 
Telephone, Coney Island 2559, 


sidan tnssfsiinemesssnenseeeneeaeeeeeee 
| a . —= 
: . 
i 
4 
| 
13 TM eR ee uk Ry 
‘g ae ee ge eee eae * Cots agg t, pee ee 
en a Pee ey oe - 
| La Py Ee ig RO } «ee Woe re eee 
se a ee oe Praia”, ee 
i i pe hia iy) £3 kei 1¢ ee ere 
: oe ee See 
: le *% AP” aa eae ore 
$ My 5 4 2 yg . 4a Pi Beg 
BE 822Cc4e. — 
j Bice ¢ ‘ 44g ae it - $n pas ag wen 
+f 5 > ee ey . a Ce Z ‘ es 
M Ey cae Yy ; rs ‘ sty 4 ' : Ba ee a 
i Fi hahiigh 6: ’ ws LE %  %: Pos : 
Bh ie Be fre bees yg @ 
+ Bones aS Se) Oey 
if ne Oe ee sco ot ‘ ee i 
her a's OS <a Ea, 
| Dn Sililittieg: F p—g T 
if Oe IT Fae Me SC a an SE, 7 
1 ya he Ns os on eee MITE we § 
‘. 
ae 
bi 7 4 
43 
it 
TI 
i 
it 
4 
i” 
| ee 
| 
: 
; 
L i : 
EEE al 
: : : 
a 
4 ee 
' 
: ee 
} 
; 
4 = 0 1 F 
i we eee 
: | * 
iA aa a ~ 
, Oe Oe ae x p.| 
‘ mw Sie. 5 Ri 
o, Ppamiiome eee 
a re eee <2 ; 
eth 3 aoe: 
: ey 4 a wk . Sg #3 
' ; a Ae SRR ie eae aa 
NS Lt a Shy Be a { 
4 i ae We SRR 
. Pitt “ae ee 
as % ee. 
i ft { 
‘ : ha 
‘ 
| ee 
i 
, 
& 


The Billooard 19 


——=LAST CALL—== 


MASONIC EXPOSITION 


FASHION SHOW : BEAUTY BAZAAR 


Biggest Event in Years 
ETE MAY 8 28" 

Madison Square Garden, N. Y. 
WANT LAWFUL CONCESSIONS---SKOWS 


DESCRIBE FULLY FIRST LETTER 


Write HARRY R. RAVER, anenagine Director 


1423 Masonic Hall, 50 W. 24th St. - - - - NEW YORK 
(GAMES MAY COME AND GAMES MAY GO 
A REAL ATTRACTION! BUT | A REAL GAME OF SKILL! 


SKEE-BALL 


WILL GO ON FOREVER: 


ELEVEN HUNDRED SKEE-BALL ALLEYS IN 


Always OPERATION = Lay — OF 1921 Always 
Popular 


Always REAL Money-Getters! 


SKEE-BALL ALLEYS HAVE ALWAYS OPERATED PERFECTLY! 


The 1922 Model Represents the Height of Mechanical Perfection 
THE AUTOMATIC COIN ATTACHMENT PROTECTS THE OWNER AND INSURES HIS “GETTING IT ALL” 


New |$1,000,000 


(ONE MILLION DOLLARS) 


SKEE-BALL CO., CONEY ISLAND, N. Y. 


MARCH 18, 1922 ee | 
—————————————————O EE OO ———————— if 
ee | | 
; 
f] - 
ee : | 
q iy 
‘ ; 
ff 
_ } 
| 
i 
; 
a | 
= 4 
| 
‘ 
s 
: ; 
a 4 
; 6 
ao Y 
ne 
S rt 
ee i 
ee ‘ 
Dae) aS i : 
7 i 
; ? 
: < 
VT ae 
§ : 
ee q 
: % 
ee | 
A ER EE a ES ED D 
a Z = 
ae 


= eee 
SSS ee. ae ee 


oh acca 8 an 


= See 


TOR ae 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


INCH 
0) 


-INCH 


Hoop skirt eee. 
with cantaloons 
trimmed very attrac- 
tively with marabou, 
garland and _  ilace. 
Hair dressin in- 


oy 


Hoop skirt dress. Pe 
trimmed very attrac- A 
tively with garland 

and marabou. Hair 
Gates J arlan Bm dressing includes 
Packed 4 doven to a| feathers. Packed 6 
case. dozen to & Case. 


Cutting Prices ® ) 
age PULP DOLLS : 


"ay d 


WIRE. ORDERS AT ONCE. 


= MOVED 10 LARGER QUARTERS 


a > French Assorted Marabou 


8 COLORS 


$1.10 Doz. 


Weare direct manufacturers and 

‘handle a complete line of carnival 

F + supplies. 

25% Deposit with order, balance C. O. D. 
References: Public National Bank; Pacific Bank. 


* Knickerbocker Doll Co., Inc. 


, ‘269 Canal St., | NEW YORK CITY. 


Loca] and Long Distance Phone, Canal 0934. Three Doors East of Broadway. 


HU = PTY ee $1! 


AL. MELTZER & CO., 


ALWAYS FIRST WITH THE NEWEST 219 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO 


In aClass by Itself 


Without Equal for 


Quality-Interest-Popularity 


Complete Outfit — Monte Carlo 
Roulette Wheel, 5% inches in diame- 
ter, and Number Cloth, size 15 by 26 
inches. 

Finely finished, heavily nickel- 
plated base. Stamped metal wheel 
with solid brass pivot, beautifully 
colored in gold and green enamel, 
with numbers from 1 to 36 sharply 
outlined on red and black. Pure 
ivory ball. 

Number Cloth of heavy durable 
oilcloth with numbers and directions 
sharply outlined in white on green 
background. 

A Beautiful Interesting Home 
Amusement at a Most Reasonable 
Price. Agents have been making 
from 15 to 25 dollars per day. 

SAMPLE SET COMPLETE on re- 
ceipt of $1.50, parcel post prepaid. 

IN QUANTITY, $10.00 per dozen; 
$108.00 per gross. 25% deposit 
must accompany all orders. 


I. CHERTOK & €0., 


Importers and Mfg. Jobbers of 
Latest ss ee 
656 Broadway, - W YORK 


HERE'S A FEW NEW ONES. 


The latest Carnival number 
MUSICAL DRUMMER BOY 
Pull the string attached to button shown in 
center of cut, and the musical Rat-a-Tat 
Tat of the Drummer Boy follows. A great 
noise maker and wonderful flash. Over 
three foot tall. 


NOVELTY UNBREAKABLE DOLLS 
WITH MAMA VOICE. 


Life-size Crying Dolls, Walking and 
Talking Dolls, Novelty Unbreakable 
Dolls, Musical Dolls. Large assortment 
Toddling Dolls, all sizes. 25 and 30-inch 
Carnival Dolls. Many other exclusive 
Novelties. 


Send for circulars and prices. 


REISMAN, BARRON & CO. 


Manufacturers, 
121 Greene St., 


NEW YORK. 


-HERE IT IS! 


New—Weod 
. Unbreakable 


tric Light (115- 
Volt) Bulb. 


. $2.50; Doz., $25.00. 
gene ce 0. D 


Phila. Doll Mfg. Co.’ 


324 North 5th St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Phone, Market, 2238. 


PARK INVESTOR 


WANTED—PARTNER WITH SMALL CAPITAL 


and service for improving a nee Ride in one of the best Parks 
around New York City. G come assured. Eight-year contract. 


S. & M. CORPORATION, 786 Broad Street, 


Newark, WN. J. 


RAVINE PARK 


FAIRMONT, W. VA. 


WANTED—PFor the coming season, to cum on or about May 29th, RIDES, 
SHOWS and Legitimate Concessions of all kinds. Percentage and flat rate. 
Also Free Attractions and Traveling Dance Orchestras for Dancing Pavilion. 
This park is located in the center of the city, on the main business street, and 
the only amusement park within seventy-five miles. A money-getter the past 
season. wstate what you have and full particulars in first letter. Address 


RAVINE PARK AMUSEMENT CO., P. O. Box 281, Fairrront, W, Va. 


+ Address E. A, KIZER, ee * sMineis. 


AMUSEMENT PARK FOR SALE—One, hun dred Ly from Chicago, 
trees, five acres Ball Park and Grand & 

best dance floor in the State; Besta rar it mal vt 4. 
story Brick Building, 28x80. gro 


Fourteen acres of land, 2,200 fruit 
House, 6 rooms: Dancing Pavilion. 55x90, 
Drink Stand, Turkish Bath House. two- 


eoper 
3040 Bott 
vd thx op leased for $1.3 200 


per year, upper floor can be leased for $600 
poe. ideal location in Park for Swimming Pool. Located on ivy Way. Chicago to St. Louis, on “intere 

ban and also on main line wal Chicago & Rock Isiand RB. BR. 106,900 px Dulati «a within a radius of thirty 
miles. Reason for srlite 


moving to Florida, Quick ai tion wecessary if you want this amap. 


Paints, Varnishes, Stains, Enamels, Colors in Oils, etc. and Impaco Products 


YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE LARGEST PARKS AND SHOWMEN OF THE EAST. 
Get Our Service. Always the Right Price. Write or Wire. 
IMPERIAL PAINT COMPANY, 76-86 10th Street. Long 


Islan 
District Offices and Warehouses: Philadelphia, Pa.; Jacksonville, Fia., eee New Vert. 


and Havona, Cuba, 


9} CO, 


Grego? 
“FUNNY-B'LOONS”—A New, Bi Sal 


(Pat. Pending) 
Let these 
new, unique 
balloons 
make money 
for you. 
“FUNNY- 
B’LOONS” 
with _ their 
comical 
faces and 
large flap- 


ping ear / 
ou @> Goer “CHINEY FACE” 


tesque cor catch everybody's 
and win sales, te 


“Smiley 
Face” has 
tassel of 


“Chiney 
Face” a cue 
of black 
yarn. 


Bither 
number, 
with our 
patented 
self - closing 
valve, or with squawker, $8.50 Per 
Gross. Samples, 10c. 

Write for complete infcrmation 
about our line. 


ANOTHER NOVELTY 
THAT’S DIFFERENT 


“SMILEY FACE” 


Y BALLS 


‘Trade Mark Reg. U.S. Pat Of, 


With Self-Closing Valve. 
May be Inflated and 
Deflated at Will. 


. “$5.50 (Reg’d Nov. 14, 1911; Oct. 20, 1920) 


id 1d 9 35 per Dezen. Co 
“TERMS: 25% cash, ee. et rh ob —_ 


The Gregory Rubber Co. 


144-146 N. Union St., Akron, Ohio. 


PADDLE WHEELS 


BICYCLE WHEELS 


ooeneneccecccc ccc oGl0.00 


No, Wheel Stet eeeeeeeereeeereer 10,00 
120-No. Wheel ..sescesess -. 10,00 
18@.No, Wheel eepeces . 
All Reversible Wheels ......---- 50 

VIXPER SOLID WHEELS 
12.15 — No, Wheels ....++++: . 12,00 
P. C. Wheels—8-No, 7 Space.. - 12,00 


250%, deposit with all “en 
DOLLS, CANDY, PADDLE TICKETS, 
SLUM and MANICURE SETS. 


VIXMAN & PEARLMAN 


620 Penn Ave., PITTSBURG, PA. 


AUTO PARTS FOR ANY CAR 


We save you 10 to 90% and ship same day orler 
=) a When in need of parts write us, giving 
model, year and parts wanted. we bev © tt. 
wit “pet it or it is mot made. Guarantee top! 
you or your money refunded. AUTO TIRE & PAuTS 
501 Broadway, Cape Girardeau. Mo. 


BILLY HART | 


formerly “with Canadian wounded soldiers. 
address to CHARLIB PELTON, General Oe 


° : 
LL A —=—_ = 
1 20 ee — | 
ie a 
ih 
at 2 4 ti = re =. 
: $ ] $ A - , ar a5 Ao) 5 a 
: 2 > ' as 9 “SA a 3 : a Sa! ~ 
- , | : i | ) “ 5 ; 3 ; es | % i wv 
« ti ae, >: Sane f 
| RIES aa | 
i ies he "' " — ~~ ee pe t. 
= ay sc ivy " 
oaee 
2 A + bright col- 
7 A ored yarn. 
it ae. ra?” te 
, i 
8 f) : 7 -. = pop De : : Ls \ 
i | ee 
Te fe 
‘ ia « 7 
in " wt 
) || = & 
. ae? 
: JO FOO c ay" : 
| Bate o sé a Aa : 
| o ye 5 ees! <i 4 : ro : Po j; 7 , 
(Ot es a ct ey F\.... Made of = * I 
 PeeaBO ae A ae ot eae | 1. 
wo 133). ; Bi ts oe a soi eonaertul je N we) 
: rs i ee. ne ae ee anc n he eS a , 
4 Aa as bad cas E 2 “ae Fr et 7 ; 
ie | A See, a | 
{ 1g : eS | 
. & 3° | | 
a i a 
. \ TaN | | 
; : [ i a PF 
| ~ —— | 
! | 
| ‘ eae 
| | — =< 
| ! | Y </ i pes | 
Db; 4 i Se 
| é NZ. 
| : | — ee — 
. \ 4 Hits 
’ ¢ We Ns Af 
i re | : CoD — WNL a8 s 
a MS | : COh=aa 
=———_—_=_=_=_=_==__=—= 
oe é — : a 
ieee . 
Pulp Sages 
MIRROR-ELECTRIC | Sapa 
A Reat Money [a a a | 
Maker. 2 bp Seat nn a a 
Doll holds in one rie “ —_—_— 
' ' hand a round i ae, | 
hand an_Elec- gi 2 oe 
which is ready i... ema 
: to att ~- on any hi gee 
| qurren . we 28. ——— 
a 
ae | A 
° vory, Atlanta, Ga. 
‘ . 
‘ ; : 


(Copyright 1922, by The Billboard Publishing Company.) 


New York City Officials Cive 
Program Their Informal 
Sanction 


EXPECTED TO TAKE 
ACTION THIS WEEK 


Managers, Actors and Public 
Agree To Abide by Deci- 


sion of 12 Persons on 


Each Play 


New York, March 1.—The plan for 
voluntary censorship by a jury spon- 
sored by playWrights, producers, play- 
ers and publie will be presented to the 
city administration this week for 
approval, -and if the necessary 
municipal machinery is set moving 
all persons immediately concerned 
with the production of a play will be 
bound by a new clause to be inserted 
in contracts, to abide by the action and 
vote of a jury selected to determine 
the life of a production. 


This is the outgrowth of the Better 
Public Shows Movement which is re- 
sponsible for the taking in hand of 
the cleaning up of the stage to check- 
mate the efforts of persons and Ore 
ganizations interested in obtaining 
passage of a State censorship law 
similar to that which controls the 
presentation of motion pictures, 

It is proposed that twelve men and 
women, all “good citizens” of average 
intelligence, shall be drawn by lot 
from among 300 talesmen. These 12 
jurors will view any play which is 

(Continued on page 239) 


FIRE 


Destroys Two Stateroom Cars 
of Levitt, Brown & Hug- 
gins’ Shows 


_ 


San Francisco, Cal., March 10.—A 
disastrous fire which started at e!¢ht 
o'clock Tuesday evening, while the 
shows’ electric plant was being re- 
plenished with gasoline, resulted in 
the total destruction of two recently 
overhauled stateroom cars of the 
Leavitt, Brown & Huggins Shows on 
the sidetrack at Reedley, Cal. That 
no lives were lost and no one serious- 
ly injured is looked upon in the light 
of a miracle, as desperate efforts were 
made to save the rolling stock and the 
personal property therein. 

Luckily, the siding on which the 
cars stood was only about 400 feet 
from the gounds upon which the show 
Was to set up, and every man on the 
lot was pressed into service to fight 
the flames. Had it not been for this 
it is believed the entire show train 

(Continued on page 239) 


FAVOR JURY CENSORSHIP PLAN | 


“HONEST JOHN” BRUNEN 


Owner Mighty Doris-Ferari 
who was assassinated. 


ESCAPE WITH $4,900 


Bandits’ Ruse Gains Admission 
to Keith’s Royal Thea- 
ter Treasurer’s 
Office 


Shows, 


New York, March 12.—Two armed 
bandits held up George Baldwin, 
treasurer of Keith’s Royal Theater, in 


* the Bronx, last night and escaped with 


$4,900 taken from the theater’s strong 
box. The robbery occurred just before 
intermission time. 
to the treasurer's office, which is lo- 
cated on the second floor, knocked on 
the door and coolly announced that 
they wished to turn in a pocketbook 
that they had found in the foyer. 
When Baldwin opened the door he was 
greeted by muzzles of two formida- 
ble looking revolvers, He was forced 
back into the office and pushed into 
a chair. One robber bound and 
gagged him, while the other covered 
him with a gun. They then proceeded 
to clean up all the money in sight. 
Just as they were about to leave Geo. 
Berruth, ticket taker in the gecond 
balcony, knocked at the door. They 
opened it, put a gun against him, 
pulled him in, bound and gagged him, 
and tied him to a chair. They then 
went out with the money and were 
lost among the patrons who were 
leaving the theater at intermission 
time. Several minutes later Berruth 
broke his ‘bonds and telephoned Al- 
fred Darling, manager, in the box- 
office, who summond the police. The 
only clue detectives found to work on 
(Continued on page 239) 


The bandits went : 


“HONEST JOHN” BRUNEN IS 
ASSASSINATED AT HIS HOME 


Prominent Carnival Owner Instantly Killed 


While Sitting Near 


Window by Charge 


From Shotgun—Murder Still Unsolved 


The outdoor show world received a 
sudden shock on Friday night, March 
10, when the news was flashed thru- 
out the country that John T. Brunen, 
one of the best known men in the car- 
nival branch of amusements and rev- 
erently referred to by his friends as 
“Honest John,” had been shot and in- 
stantly killed that evening at about 
7:30 o’clock while sitting near a win- 
dow in his home at Riverside, N. J. 


Mr. Brunen was 48 years of age 
and the owner of the organization 
known as the Mighty Doris-Ferarti 
Shows. His early years in his chosen 
profession were spent in the circus 
business, later changing over to carni- 
vals, with which he became notably 
successful, 

Reports of the shooting received by 
The Billboard at this writing are both 
meager and somewhat conflicting, tho 
all seem to bear toward the fact that 
Mr. Brunen had returned in his auto- 
mobile from Williamstown, N. J., 
where his shows are in winter quar- 
ters, and was reading a newspaper 
when the fatal shot was fired, the 
death-dealing weapon used being a 


MANAGERS 


Will Have Chance To See Rather 
Than Read New Plays 
With Competent 
Casts 


New York, March 13.—If the plan 
of the Play Producing Society of New 
York is as feasible as it appears to be 
managers will be given very effective 
first aid in the selection of new plays 
for production. This became known 
today with the announcement by the 
society that this season's program for 
new productions has been prepared 
and that four untried and otherwise 
unknown plays are in rehearsal with 
competent professionals playing the 
parts and not amateurs as hitherto 
stated thru error. 


The first production will be made 
next Sunday night at the Little Thea- 
ter here under the direction of Thos. 
Coffin Cooke. The play will be “White 
Mask,” behind which the authers are 
hiding and probably awaiting the call 
of eager managers who may desire to 
make the production for Broadway. 
The piece will have the benefit of pro- 
fessional presentation, for Mr. Cooke is 
of the Wagenhals & Kemper forces 

(Continued on page 209) 


shotgun and the charge taking effect 
above and a little to the rear of the 
showman’s left ear, shattering the 
back of his head. Mrs. Brunen, who 
was in another part of the home, on 
hearing the shot fired and the shat- 
tering of glass, hastened to her hus- 
band, who was lying prone upon the 
floor, still clutching the paper he was 
reading and with hig head slightly 
elevated by the leg of a table. Their 
daughter, Hazel, and her grandmother 
(Continued on page 239) 


J. GEO. LOOS SHOWS 


Have Auspicous Opening at 
Southwestern Exposition 
and Fat Stock Show 


——7. 

Fort Worth, Tex., March 11.—Fears 
of carnival men that the early season 
openings would be bad constituted 
nothing but borrowed trouble. The 
J. George Loos Shows opened tonight 
at the Southwestern Exposition and 
‘Fat Stock Show under conditions as 


fine as if Mr. Loog could have had the ~ 


making of them himself. His twenty- 
five-car show was stepping from win- 
ter quarters without a rail run, and 
it stepped out in the finest weather 
Fort Worth has known for weeks. 
Located alongside the immense 
Coliseum in the stock yards Mr. Loos 
had space enough to show his wares 
to best advantage. The opening night 
found a packed house at the pageant 
staged in the Coliseum. The over- 
flow from that alone would fill any 
carnival midway. The J. George Loos 
Shows are worthy of the worthy; there 
is no comparative or superlative degree. 
It means the shows could in no wise 
(Continued on page 239) 


‘ THEATERS 


At Washington, D. cs Ordered 
To Install Steel Fire 
Curtains 


Washington, March 12.—Washing- 
ton theaters and motion picture houses 
have been ordered to install steel fire 
curtains before all stages. The fact 
managers were given thirty days in 
which to install the curtains did not 
materially lessen the blow. Some 
managers believe it will be impossible 

(Continued on page 239) 


Last Week’ Issue of The Bilboard Contained 1.578 Classified Ads, Totaling 7,682 Lines, and 700 Display Ads, Totaling 22,560 Lines; 2,278 Ads, Occupying 30,242 Lines in All 


The Edition of This Issue of The Billboard Is 100,000 


LE 2 BR ID Caan, 


i eas 


4 ethane 


, YY, SMMMMITISULSUS AVY L , Yj Yy YY Yy YY Y Y YY y yj yy aaaanessests Hip Yj OD UY MISITIA Wy y YY YY y, Ll yy Yj Y Yy YY YY YY y 7 f 
: YY a YY UY j YY f yy YY fHjfyyfy, Uy YY Yj Yy Yip Yi Y Y Yy Wy YY / Yi UY Yip Yy Y { 
FA ee OF pe = EN A 
fff YY Uf Yy Y Yy YW Uy Yj. d pp | § 
YBblinn...- x MMe ronseveves - ne $MM sccaacanecanamet cnc) Sarva? Nexmeee Samet timmero® coors V/oerettmnt Semett /// Samer mnt i, wo 
- 
PJAQNSC) ATI VESP N ~ N /  § 
_ } 
| 
Phe E 
a A of PRS 4 && ; : - 
— 2 
| — - ee 
| , a . $ > 7 
x bits + 
a 8p ed sn et | 
oe ° es ' 
a Attn j “. 
d iS eo, . mS ‘ | 
| 7 ae ‘ 3 : { ~ 
oo In eee i 
: 7 of fa 7S 98 r» J mt may am3 ‘ 
>t } q & x * 
a 
NS 
ee ee eT | 
= — 
Po | | | 
=o | 
_ 
— — 
a : j | 
- 
: 
7 a 


— ae 


=e 


here 


« ie 


22 


— 


The Bi 


liboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


SSeS 


NOTABLES AT OPENING OF 


LOEW’S 


STATE, BOSTON 


Stars of Screen and Stage Guests of Marcus 
Loew at Inauguration of Finest Play- 
house in New England 


Boston, March 13.—The long anticipated 
opening of Loew's New State Theater on 


Massachusetts avenue took place ton ght. The 
mew playhouse, with a seating capacity of 
4200, now heads the Lst as the finest 


playhouse in New England, The entire cost 
of construction for the theater and its allied 
stores, offices, studios and ballroom is close to 
63,000,000. It is owned and operated by the 
State Theater Company, a Massachusetts cor- 
poration, with Marcus Loew as its president 
and Douglas Flaherty as managing director. 
The theater and adjacent build-ngs occupy 
Ope and one-quarter acres of land on Massa- 
chusetts avenue, at Norway and Astor streets. 
It is equipped with every modern appl‘ance 
for the absolute convenience and comfort of 
its patrons. There is but one balcony and an 
excellent view of the stage may be had from 
every seat. The policy of the new playhouse 
fs the same as the other Loew theaters at 
Boston—first run photoplays and vaudeville. 
The arrival of Marcus Loew and his band of 
movie stars drew thousands to the South Sta- 
tion and from there to the City Hall and the 
State House, the 35 automob:les forming the 
parade passing thru streets banked with people. 
It was one of the greatest theatrical events 
Boston has witnessed in years. The crowds, 
the stars, Mr. Loew receiving the key to the 
city from Mayor Curley, the party at the State 
House, the crowd going into the new theater 
were all shot by a battery of moving picture 
cameras from the news service and will show 
the largest array of stars ever assembled in 
one place at an occasion of this kind. About 
every manager and exhib!tor here was on hand 
at the station to meet the party, headed by 
Douglas Flaherty, Loew's Boston representa- 
tive. At the South Station the crowds, rushed 
the gates, and it was estimated by Superin- 
tendent Crowley, of the police department, that 


c 


MINNIE DUPREE HAS CLAIM 
AGAINST LANGLEY ESTATE 


New York, March 11.—It became known this 
week thru the filing of a final accounting of 
the estate of William H. Langley that the 
executors had a claim for $25,000 against the 
estate to Minnie Dupree, actress, and that on 
protest of one of Mr. Langley'’s daughters the 
obligation had been assumed by his son and 
another daughter. There was nothing to show 
the nature of the claim. Miss Dupree was 
mentioned in Mr, Langley’s will as “‘a friend."’ 


“THE BAT” COMPANY CLOSES 


Chicago, March 11.—The company that 
Played ‘“‘The Bat’ in Chicago, establishing a 
record of fifty-four continuous weeks, has 
closed in Wisconsin. Several of the actors, 
including Karl Way, who played the role of 
the Unknown, and Mrs. Way (Cora King) 
arrived in Chicago. Moch wonder was caused 
by the closing of the show, it is said, as the 
company had steadily played to capacity. 


10,000 people were packed in the train shed. 
The new theater opened at 7 p.m. All the stars 
were introduced, causing the show to run well 
up to midnight, 

The opeping picture bill was Wallace Reig in 
“The World’s Champion’? and Ethel] Clayton is 
“The Cradle,” besides other screen features and 
news film. 


CENSORSHIP BILL 
PASSES IN VIRGINIA 


Richmond, Va., March 11.—The motion pic- 
ture censorship bill passed the Senate this af- 
ternoon 26 to 13 and now goes to the Governor, 
whose signature is assured. The bill passed 
the House of Delegates yesterday. 

The censorship law is almost identical with 
the Maryland law. Three censors will draw 
$2,500 salary each. They have absolute author- 
ity over the films, Exhibitors express the 
opinion that 50 per cent of the men in the 
business in Virginia will have to close their 
doors, 


ELIMINATES “CUSS” WORD 


London, Eng., March 12 (Special Cable to 
The Billboard).—The Lord Chamberlain, by 
eliminating Shaw's famous expletive in ‘‘Pyg- 
malion” from Jobn Galsworthy’s ‘‘Loyal- 
ties’, now playing at St. Martin's, has decided 
that he will not allow that “‘cuss’’ word in 
any other new production. 

If he extended it to “damn” and “hell” our 
vaudeville comedians would be stuck. 


SHUBERT VAUDE. ENDS IN A, GC. 


Atlantic City, March 10.—Shubert vaudeville 
at the Nixon Apollo ends with this week's bill. 
Of this Mort Eiseman, reviewer on one of the 
da'lies, states: ‘There is no reason now for 
holding post-mortems over the remains of Shu- 
bert vaudeville in Atlantic City. Taken all in 
all, the majority lies in favor of good shows; 
so we have something to be thankful for.” 


NATIONAL THEATER SOLD— 
NOT ENGLEWOOD THEATER 
Chicago, March 10.—The Chicago office of 
The Billboard was in error in reporting the 
sale of the Englewood Theater in the last 
issue. The National Theater was sold in @ 
real estate transaction, and it was the Na- 
tional that should have been mentioned, not 
the Englewood. 


“IN NELSON’S DAYS” 
NOT LIKED BY LONDON 


London, Eng., March 12 (Special Cable to 
The Billboard).—‘‘In Nelson's Days,"’ the cos- 
tume melodrama by Mrs. Clifford Mills, pro- 
duced by Percy Hutchinson at the Shaftesbury 
Theater last night, was received with ironical 
laughter and cat calls, 

There were thirty-nine speaking characters. 


~ ANTI-BLUE LAW CONFERENCE 


Arrangements have been completed for the 
first annual nationa] anti-blue law conference, 
which will be held under the auspices of the 
Anti-Bine Law League of America, Inc., at 
8t. Louis, Mo., June 23, 24 and 25, ending 
with a big public mass meeting on the n'‘ght 
of Sunday, June 25, in Exposition Auditor‘um. 
This will be the first time the forces opposed 
to Sunday blue laws in the country have held 
@ convention. 


Prominent persons will participate ip the 
program, which will be announced in a forth- 
coiaing issue of The Billboard. Convention 
hedquarters will be established at the Hotel 
Plenters, St. Louis, on April 1, and an intensive 
publicity and mail campaign will be conducted 
‘or two months to insure the success of the 
convention. St. Louis was selected for the 
meeting because of the v gorous blue law agi- 
tat‘on in Missouri, following the closing of 
Paimyra, Springfield and other Missouri cities 
to recreation on Sundays. Reformers are m*k- 
ing an effort to get a state-wide law thru the 
legislature this fall. 

F. C. Dailey, national executive secretary of 
the Anti-Blue Law League of America, Inc., 
will be in charge of the St. Louis convention 
headquarters. Mr, Dailey has been touring the 
States of New Jersey and West Virginia in an 


effort to secure repeal of the old State-wide 
blue laws now on the statute books in these 
States. Favorable report was given the league's 
bill in New Jersey and in Charleston, W. Va., 
where a vigorous campaign bas been in prog- 
ress several weeks, the major was made to 
relent on his Sunday clos'ng order. An effective 
State organization is being established in West 
Virginia. Extensive organization work wi!! fol- 
low in Kentucky, where local] branches of the 
league are now being formed at Ashland, Lex- 
ington, Frankfort and Louisville. 


NO BUILDING PERMIT 
FOR WRECKED THEATER 

New York, March 11.—That no building per- 
mit was issued for the construction of the 
American Theater in Brookbyn, whictf col- 
lapsed, killing seven workmen and injuring 
seventeen otkers, November 29 last, was the 
testimony of Alfred E. Kleinert, building su- 
perintendent of the borough since 1918, at a 
John Doe hearing this week to determine re- 
sponsibility for the crash, 

“It is a mystery to me how this bulld@ing 
‘was ever constructed,” he declared, “‘as there 
was no permit for jt, not even for the masonry 
work,” 


ONLY ONE BURLESQUE 
HOUSE NOW IN ST. PAUL 


St. Paul, Minn., March 9.—W. ©. Scott, 
manager of the Comet Theater, again has the 
burlesque field in the Holy City to himself, 
the New Gayety Theater having closed March 
5. Business has been on the increase at the 
Comet since the closing of the opposition house, 
Manager Scott running special features. 

Messrs. Whitehead and Crawford, formerly 
of the New Gayety Theater, have gone to 
Davenport, Ia., where they are to open the 
Liberty Theater with a tab. show. 


NEW RAINBO GARDENS TO BE 
BUILT AT COST OF $300,000 


Chicago, March 10.—Rainbo Gardens, on the 
north side, have been a paying as well as a 
popular institution. The cwners are preparing 
to build an entire new set of buildings at a 
cost of $300,000 to replace the rambling old 
frame structure. There will be space in the 
new structure for three thousand dancers. 


75,000 VISIT CONEY 


New York, March 13.—Drawn to the sea- 
shore by the balmy spring weather, more 
than 75,000 persons visited Coney Island yes- 
terday. Bath houses were opened and hbun- 
dreds ventured into the chilly waters. 

Large crowds also visited Brighton and 
Rockaway beaches. 


COLUMBIA THEATER OPENS 
WITH ITS NEW POLICY 


Chicago, March 13.—The Columbia Theater 
opened with its new continuous policy yester- 
day. The program is made up of feature pic- 
tures, vaudeville acts and the regular bur- 
lesque show, running from 11 a.m. to 10:30 
p.m. The house was filled. I. M. Weingarten 
is house manager. 


COHAN WINS VERDICT 


In $50,000 Suit of Robert H -q 


New York, March 11.—Verdict in favor of 
George M. Coban, sued by Robert Hilliard 
actor-playwright, for $50,000 for alleged breach 
of contract, was rendered this week by a jary 
before Supreme Court Justice Jobn Ford. 

Prior to March, 1919, Cohan and Mr. Hi. 
lard were close friends, being associated in 
the production of “‘A Prince There Was.” Mr. 
Hilliard relinquished his title role in the pro. 
duction to Cohan, who paid $25,000 for the 
play, promising, it is alleged, to write a play 
for Mr. Hilliard. This promise, it was claimea 
by the latter, was broken. 

Attorney for Cohan declared during his aq- 

dress to the jury that his client was without 
blemish, and called upon ex-Judge Olcott, Mr, 
Hilliard’s counsel, to get down on his knees 
ani ask forgiveness for calling Cohan a 
““welcher.”’ 
. “Welcher,"" however, was not the only thing 
said against Cohan’s character during the 
eourse of the trial. On the stand the plaintiff? 
declared that Cohan wrote ‘‘Over There” dur 
ing the war and ‘‘stayed over here.” 


“DRESS REHEARSAL” 
PROVES MILD SUCCESS 


London, Eng., March 12 (Special Cable to 
The Billboard).—Eddie Vogt made a mild 
laughing success with ‘‘A Dress Rehearsal” at 
the Victoria Palace, March 6, but his show 
eppeals more to a professional audience. 


JANSEN TO AUSTRALIA 


— — 


New York, March 12.—Harry Jansen, ma- 
gician, sails from San Francisco March 28 for 
Sydney, Australia, to present Horace Goldin's 
version of ‘‘Sawing a Woman in Half’’. Jansen 
plans a tour that will cover two years, and, in 
addition to the antipodes, will take him into 
the far East. 


CINTI. HOUSES CHANGE POLICY 


In WNnza with the Srlanger-Shubert booking 
@greement the Shubert Theater, Cincinnati, will 
change from the legitimate to a vaudeville 
policy March 19. On the same day the Olymple 
Theater, Columbia Burlesque stand, which is 
located a half-block from the Shubert Theater, 
will add vaudeville and pictures to its regular 
performances, affording continuous showing 
daily from 1 to 10.45 p.m. 

Shubert vaudeville was recently tried out for 
two weeks in Cincinnati with much success. 
The ‘“‘Promenaders,"” headed by Jimmy Hussey, 
will be next week’s unit vaude. attraction. 

The new agreement leaves the Cox Thea- 
ter (Shubert) and the Grand Opera House 


BALTIMORE THEATER ROBBED 


Two youths robbed the Elektra Theater, a 
Picture house at 1039 N. Gay street, Balti- 
more, Md., on the night of March 4, escaping 
with $600. 

Wanda Miedzianowski, owner of the theater, 
on Friday leased to R. Mario Jerzasr, who had 
given her a deposit of $500, This money, to- 
gether with the day's receipts, was in a hand- 
bag lying on a board inside the ticket booth. 
She had just finished paying members of the 
orchestra and had closed the wooden slide of 
the aperture thru which patrons receive their 
tickets, when she beard a slight noise. Turn- 
ing around, she saw the slide fall down, a band 
reach thru the aperture and seize the bag. 

As two youths ran from the booth they were 
pursued, but made good their escape. 


CHAS. BRAY RESIGNS 


With a record of twenty-five years of serv- 
ice, Col. Chas, E. Bray has resigned as general 
representative of the Orpheum Circuit to enter 
other theatrical ventures, 

For the past eighteen months Col. Bray has 
been engaged on the Pacific Coast in a fight 
against ticket scalping. His efforts are re- 
ported to have been successful. For many 
years he was a railroad executive and since 
entering the amusement business he has taken 
a hand in practically every branch of the 
profession. 


RETURNS TO LAW 


Chicago, March 11.—Jay J, McCarthy, for 
ten years w'th the Chicago Herald and Exam- 
iner and Chicago American, has written Thé 
Billboard that he hase resigned and will re- 
enter the practice of law, in association with 
Charlies A. Williams and M. R. Bisner. 


KANSAS 0. H. BURNS 


The Opera Honse at Bird City, Kansas, was 
burned to the ground on the night of March 
4, when a hardware atore next door was set 
afire by robbers and the flames spread to the 
theater, The loss is $20,000, 


(Erlanger) the only legitimate houses in Cin- 
cinnati. The latter theater has the largest 
seating capacity and will accommodate the 
more important plays. 


BRITISH NATIONAL OPERA 
COMPANY HAS BEEN FORMED 
Ottawa, Can., March 11.—A British National 
Opera Company has been formed. It is com- 
posed of British musicians and singers, and will 
travel from town to town giving the best in 
grand opera. It opened its first tour recently 
in Bradford and reports of progress are en- 
couraging. The prices are as low as possible 
and no profits are taken. The popularity of 
the operatic entertainment now being staged 
by amateurs in Ottawa and the lack of any 
prospect that professional grand opera will be 
seen in Oanada again lend the British proj- 
ect a special interest. 


ROCHESTER THEATERS DEAL 


Rochester, N. Y., March 11.—Majority stock 
fm the Regorson Corporation, operating the 
Regerlt, Picadilly and Loew's Star theaters, 
has been acquired by a group of Rochester bus- 
iness men headed by George W. Todd, of the 
Todd Protectograph Company. Details have 
not as yet been all worked out. All the houses 
for the present will be operated under the 
same management. 

The deal transfers to the syndicate the Pica- 
dilly Theater, including real estate and 57% 
per cent of the stock in the East Avenue 
Amusement Company, which erected the Re- 
gent Theater on a land lease. 


SCHENECTADY THEATER ROBBED 

Schenectady, N. Y., March 9.—Thieves broke 
into the office of the Strand Theater early 
Monday morning and stole $300 in cash and 
several pieces of jewelry, but overlooked 
$1,100. The $300 taken and the $1,100 left 
were part of the Saturday and Sunday receipts. 
Most of the jewelry belonged to William M. 
Shirley, owner and manager. 


ARRIVE ON STEAMER PARIS 


New York, March 12.—M. H. Diamant Ber- 
gere, French cinema magnate, arrived in New 
York yesterday aboard the steamer Paris. An- 
other passenger was Mile. Renee Pomcelet, dan- 
seuse from the Casino, Paris, who will join 
Ziegfeld's Follies. 


THEATER FIRE AT FREMONT 


Fire that apparently started under the stage 
of the Empress Theater, Fremont, Neb., oD 
the morning of March 5, damaged the building 
to the extent of $10,000, the stage and curta!ne 
being destroyed and the whole interior badly 
damaged. 


——_ 

ee ee 
Ly 
= 
oT 
Ee 
_ vt 


MARCH 18, 1922 


‘The Bi 


llboard 


PASTOR WARNS 


THAT PUBLIC 


MUST RID STAGE OF FILTH 


J-hn Haynes Holmes, Supporter of Theater and 
Censorship Foe, Blames Playgoers 


New York, March 13.—The Rev. Dr. John 
Haynes Holmes, pastor of the Community 
Church here, and admittedly a “passionate 
lover of the theater’’ and an opponent of 
censorship, has issued a statement in which 
be warns that conditions in the theater today 
“sre a stench in the nostrils of every decent 
citizen” and urges that managers, actors, pub- 
lic and press unite to mitigate these condi- 
tions. His statement in part follows. 

“How long do the people of New York pro- 
pose to stand for the present indescribable situa- 
tion in our theaters? Have we actually become 
so utterly demoralized in thought and senti- 
ment that we are going to permit a continu- 
ance of conditions which are jntolerable to 
every decent-minded man and woman? Have 
we got to come to the desperate remedy of a 
censorship in order to rid the city of the filth 
which now encumbers and pollutes its life? 

“] hesitate to state what I really feel about 
many of the New York theaters lest my opin- 
jon be confused with that of certain other 
crities with whose methods and ideas alike 
I have not the slightest sympathy. 

“To guard myself against such misjudgment, 
may 1 say that I am a passionate lover of 
the theater and believe that it is incomparably 
the noblest as it is the most influential social 
institution that we have. I cannot remem- 
ber a time when I was not a regular attendant 
at the theater, seeing the finest plays and the 
greatest actors, Today the theater, along with 
the opera house and the symphony hall, is my 
chief source of recreation and inspiration. 

Respects Some Managers 

“I know some of the theatrical] managers 
and have great respect for them. I have 
the honor of acquaintanceship with prominent 
actors and actresses and know them to be 
ladies and gentlemen who are an honor to 
the great profession which they adorn. It 
is these very interests and relationships whicn 
hold me fast to the theater and make me 
jealous of its name. Indeed, it is just be- 
cause I love the theater so much that I am 
impelled to declare my conviction that the the- 
atrical situation im New York today is an 


unmitigated scandal, a stench in the nostrils . 


of every decent citizen. 

“The other day I looked over the advertise- 
ments in a newspaper and counted thirty-nine 
productions in as many first-class theaters, and 
of these no less than nine were plays so in- 
decent that they should be banished utterly 
from any stage that makes a claim to be civ- 
flized. Such plays are no more entitled to 
display on a public stage than garbage or 
sewage on a public street. 


“If such conditions continue it is, of course, 
certain that a censorship will come, and if it 
comes let me say this: Do not blame the min- 
isters and the churches. Do not talk about 
the blue stockings and Puritan fanatics. Put 
the blame for s censorship where it belongs— 
on the theatrical managers who put these 
filthy plays on the boards for the sake of the 
dirty money they can make and invite the 
public to come in and see them. 


Opposed to Censorship 


“I am opposed, however, to a censorship, 
and it is because I am opposed that I want 
the present situation cleaned up before we 
have the censorship imposed upon us. A cen- 
sorship has no place in a democracy because 
it involves the substitution of a government 
of persons for a government of law—an opin- 
ion for a principle in social order. Further- 
more, a censorship, however well administered, 
is an intolerable interference with the free 
activity of the creative spirit. 


“What we must have today is not a resort 
to censorship but to the common law. This 
common law, as Chief Magistrate McAdoo says, 
has broken down, but this means not that the 
law is defective but that public opinion for 
some reason or other is demoralized or in- 
different. What we need at this moment is 
a quickening of public sentiment, and every 
teacher in this city, im church or school, in 
pulpit or platform, should bend his every en- 
ergy from now on to stir the public mind to 
a consciousness of what is going on today and 
to an expression of outrage and action against 
this poison forced upon us.”’ 


WOULD ANNUL CONTRACT 


St. Paul, Minn., March 10.—Mr. and Mrs. 
Ray A. Briggs agreed to buy the Oak Theater 
for $34,500, paying $1,000 cash and giving a 
deed to their home to Merchant P. Buzzell, of 
Minneapolis, in part payment, Now they are 
su'ng to recover the money and property given 
in payment and for an annulment of the con- 
tract, claiming the theater is a losing propo- 
sition instead of a “‘little gold mine’ as rep- 
resented. 


FRIARS TO HONOR BURNSIDE 


New York, March 11.—R. H. Burnside, gen- 
eral stage director of the Hippodrome, has 
accepted an invitation to be the guest of 
honor at a dinner at the Friars’ Club April 
2. The feed will be followed by an enter- 
tainment in the Clubhouse theater. 


Chorus Equity Association of America 


JOHN EMERSON, President. 


DOROTHY BRYANT, Executive Secretary. 


Thirteen new members joined the Chorus 
Equity in the past week. 

Any one knowing the . “dress of Miss Dolly 
Verlaine, Miss Helen Powell or Bob Willis will 


INSURES YOUR TEETH 
AGAINST PYORRHEA 


Send today for ten-day trial tube free 


Pyorrhea, one of the worst 
enemies of health and beauty, 
affects four people out of every 
five who pass the age of forty. 
Thousands younger also suffer. 
If your gums are tender, if they 
bleed when brushed, you have 
the first symptoms of Pyorrhea. 
Forhan’s For the Gums, formula 
of R. J, Forhan, D.D.S., will, if 
used consistently and used in 
time, prevent Pyorrhea or check 
its progress. Send today for ten- 
day free sample. The Forhan 
Company, Room 904, 200 Sixth 
Avenue, New York. 


FORHAN’S FOR THE GUMS 


| 


Please notify this office. We are holding a 
check in settlement of a claim for Ruth Everett. 

The ‘‘Mecca’’ chorus is one hundred per cent 
Equity with the exception of one member. 

Recently several chorus people have given as 
their reason for not joining the Equity that 
they will not be in the profession next season. 
In two cases they were playing in Chicago at 
the time. Once a week they receive salary 
for a ninth performance. This is a direct 
result of the work of the Equity. If you 
are enjoying the benefits of the association, 
even if it is only for a short time, you should 
support the organization that has made bet- 
ter conditions for you. Your landlord wouldn't 
excuse you from paying the rent this year be- 
cause you didn't expect to be in the apartment 
next year. Help your deputy make your com- 
pany one hundred per cent. 


Again you were warned that, working in the 
chorus, you should accept only the pink Chorus 
Equity contract, not the white contract issued 
by the Actors’ Equity. The fact that you are 
speaking a few lines does not take you out of 
the chorus, nor is it worth while to lose your 
sleepers jn order to get a principal’s contract— 
unless you are compensated accordingly. The 
average chorus salary runs anywhere from 
thirty-five dollars to sixty-five. There is a 
first-class company on the road this season in 
which all the chorus people accepted the white 
principal’s contract. They have paid for sleep- 
ers almost every week. But not one member 
of that chorus reported to the association that 
they had an Actors’ Equity contract instead of 
a Chorus Equity. 

Is your company one hundred per cent in 
good standing?--DOROTHY BRYANT, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary. 


BROMBERG CO. ABSORBS 
S. E. PICTURE CORPORATION 


New Orleans, March 10.—Car!l F, Mock, resi- 
dent manager of the Southeastern Picture Cor- 
porat'on in this city, announces the absorption 
of that corporation by the Arthur C. Bromberg 
Company, of Atlanta, whereby the Bromberg 
company takes over the exchanges at Atlanta 
and Charlotte and will operate the same un- 
der the name of Arthur C, Bromberg Attrac- 
tions, with headquarters at Atlanta. Mr. Mock 
came here some months ago from the Atlanta 
office of the Southeastern corporation and dur- 
ing his term of management has made the 
Southeastern a leader amorg the independent 
exchanges in this territory. With the added 
features which the consolidation will bring 
him Mr. Mock will enlarge his quarters. 


ATTACHMENT GRANTED 
AGAINST OLIVER MOROSCO 


New York, March 11.—An attachment against 
the property of Oliver Morosco was granted in 
the Supreme Court this week in a suit of 
Charles H. Tuttle, a lawyer, on a note for 
$3,000, and one by Tuttle and William Klein, 
also an attorney, for a balance of $20,874 for 
legal services. The attachment was obtained 
on the ground that Mr. Morosco was a resi- 
dent of California. It was served on the Mor- 
osco Holding Company, and on two banks 
where the defendant was alleged to have 
funds. 


The plaintiffs sued for balance due on an 
agreement by Morosco to pay them $30,000 for 
services in his litigation several years ago, 
when actions were pending between Morosco 
and his wife, Mrs. Annie T. Morosco. 


GEORGE M. COHAN 


Replaces James Rennie in Play Writ- 
ten To Star Daughter of Producer 


New York, March 13.—History is half way 
repeating itself on Broadway, for the Four 
Cohans are now the Two Cohans since George 
M., playwright-producer-player, has jumped 
into the piece he wrote and produced as a 
starring vehicle for Georgette, his daughter. 
It is not reported that the play was not a 
success, but it is known that since Mr. Cohan 
arranged with James Rennie to step out the 
business for ‘‘Madeleine and the Movies’’ at 
the Gaiety has jumped. 

This is the fourth time Mr. Cohan has con- 
sidered it advisable to replace one of his 
featured players ‘n one of his own produe- 
tions. He has just won a law suit regarding 
the first play in which ~9 did this. Soon after 
he produced “A Prince There Was’’ he sub- 
stituted for Robert Hilliard. Recently Hil- 
liard failed to convince a jury that he should 
be remunerated to the extent of $50,000 for 
this. 

Last year Mr. Cohan jumped into “The 
Meanest Man in the World’’ when this piece 
was reported to be a financial flop and later 
he took over Arnold Daly’s part in “The 
T.vern.”* 

Now he is taking the curtain calls at the 
Gaiety with his daughter and the Two Cobans 
@re on Broadway. 


MACLOON WITH MOROSCO 


New York, March 13.—Jay D. Barnes has 
been succeeded as general press representa- 
tive of the Morosco enterprises vy Louis O. 
Macloon, effective today. 


ERLANGER’S UNIQUE BUILDING 


New York, March 11.—A. I.. Erlanzer com- 
pleted arrangements this week fo- the erec- 
tion of a seven-story bu'iding in West Forty- 
ninth street of a unique type, where will be 
grouped under one roof al] the shops and other 
spaces necessary for the completion of any 
kind of theatrical produciion. 

It will have a carpenter shop, property 
shop, electrical shop and a wardrobe and cos- 
tuming department. There will be _ strong 
vaults for storage of valuables used in a pro- 
duction, and a place for storing the production 
itself until it is needed. 

The building wi.l huve a stage equipped with 
an electrical switchboard and al] the necessary 


MME, JERITZA ENTERTAINED 


New York, March 93.—Captain Alexander FP. 
§. Hambleton, commander of the White Star 
liner Olympic, acted as host yesterday at a 
luncheon given on board his ship, at Pier 5y, 
New York, to Mme. Marie Jeritza, the Metro- 
politan Opera Company prima donna, and her 
husband, Baron Popper. Otto Weil, represent- 
ing the Metropolitan Opera Company, and 
Thomas R. Thorne, assistant passenger traffic 
manager of the International Mercantile Marine 
Company, were also of the party. 

After luncheon Mme. Jeritza inspected the 
ship, on which she is booked to sail on April 
1 for Europe. 


CHI. MOVIE HOUSE CHANGES 


Chicago, March 11.—The Adams Theater, 
East Adams street, has been reopemed after 
repairs and alterations were made. M. H. 
Katz is the manager. The Vesta Theater, 
Forty-second and Cottage Grove, has been taken 
over by Max Gumbiner, making that manager’s 
third house. Both theaters named above are 
movie houses. 


“CANDIDA” 


Instead of “Creditors” 


New York, March 13.—Maurice Browne and 
Ellen Van Volkenburg will open their season 
at the Greenwich Village Theater next Mon- 
day night with Shaw's ‘‘Candida’”’ instead of 
with Strindberg’s ‘Creditors’, as previously an- 
nounced. 


NEW HOUSE FOR ALBANY 


Albany, N. Y., March 11.—The Lodge Street 
Building Company has purchased here a plot 
of elaborate design for the showing of high- 
class theatrica] attractions and the booking 
of vaudeville acts. The seating capacity will 
not exceed 1,300. 


WILL RAZE CLEVELAND O, H. 


Cleveland, 0., March 8.—The Opera House, 
one of the oldest theaters in the country, will 
be razed shortly after April 1. In its place 
a commercial structure, costing more than 
$1,000,000, will be erected. 


paraphernalia, so a production can be assem- 
bled and all sorts of lighting effects tried. It 
will likewise have a rehearsal room. It will be 
ready to open i: July. 


7y, Sketches —Monologues 


Written to order. Terms 
\reasonable. (Est.) 


Eddie (Hayden) O'Connor, 
1531 Broadway, New York 


AT LIBERTY 


Union Trap Drummer 


Plays soft syncopation on muffied drums. No 

or xylophones. Also plays song whistle and everything 
up to date in modern dance drumming. State your 
best. Permanent address: “HAPPY’ MACK, 512 B 
Yime St., Lakeland. Florida, 


MUSICAL COMEDY 
PRODUCER at Liberty 


First time im fifteen years. Highest references from 
Broadway managers, Have an interesting proposition 
which ig new and orizinal for Summer Parks and 
Amusement Resorts requiring the best. Address PRO- 
DUCER, care Billboard, Cincinnati, Ohbéo. 


MED. LECTURER 


WANTED that is good audience and office man and 
ean do straight in acts when 


CKFACE COMEDIAN 


that can sing and dance, and other useful Single Per- 
formers that cam change specialties often and work 
in acts. State lowest salary (pay own board) and 
all you do Money sure. Omn'y experienced and re- 
Hable people write. CHAS. ALLEN, Manager Nature’s 
Remedy Co., Bluefield, West Virginia. 


VALET—JAPANESE 


23 years old, 5 ft. 8 in., 123 Ibs., neat appearance, 
willing and faithful worker, desires position as 
Valet. Will be glad to take part of the show if 
necessary; has experience on the stage, SUKI, 15 
Suton Place, New York City. 


WANTED QUICK 


PRODUCING COMEDIAN 
SPECIALTIES. 
ECHOES OF BROADWAY CO., 
Colonial Theatre, Pittsburg, Kansas. 


KATHLEEN BRENON 


Please communicate with HARRY at once. 


AT LIBERTY 


MES J. RICE—Character Comedian. MARGARET 
{MONS Heavies. Characters, some Leads. JIMMY 
RICE, JR.—Juveniles, Light Comedy. Strong Spe- 
cialties. All essentials. Stock or Rep. Address 
care Ed. C. Nutt Show. Houston, Texas 


WANTED MUSICIANS 


ce Musicians on all instruments. (pen 
a a Kansas City. State lowest salary. 
furnish ‘berth and transportation, Address 
ANDBEEWS, Montgomery, Ala 


RT PRR I geet. ae See Eo 


| 
tS 
—T | _ 4 
=——| 
Fe 
ee oe 
=a 
_| ry 
{_ = — | 


oe 


Sage et 


ig 


MARCH 18, 1922 


NEWS THAT IS NEWS, HONEST AND DISINTERESTED REVIEWS 


Conducted by EDWARD HAFFEL 


Action on “Pins and Needles” and Such Shows 
Is Awaited—Number of Performances 
the Issue 


New York, March 13.—“When is a revue not a revue?” That is a 
question that is interesting those who are following the affairs of the 
Actors’ Equity Association and the efforts of the majority of union 
actors to get within their ranks all professional players. 


“When it’s in vaudeville.” That 
is the answer that seems to be mak- 
ing an issue of the question and 
which, it is predicted, will precipi- 
tate another encounter, verbal if not 
physical, between managers and or- 
ganized actors. 


Albert DeCourville’s “Pins and Nee- 
dies” is the cause of the prophesied 
conflict. Whether it will start an erup- 
tion of the rumbling volcano that can 
be heard by all who will lean their ears 
toward the ground is a question, but 
at least it is known the opening of this 
show in Philadelphia today under the 
banner of Shubert vaudeville will be 
watched by Equity leaders for infrac- 
tions of union rules. No arguments are 
being offered by Equity or interested 
managers, but an official of Equity did 
say this: 


“We know that ‘Pins and Nee- 
dies’ is to open in vaudeville. 
If it is vaudeville, as we must 
believe until we are advised 
otherwise, we have no jurisdic- 
tion, and, naturally, we can not 
presuppose there is to be any vio- 
lation of Equity agreements. 
However, we are not blind to the 
opportunities this move by 
“managers offers, and naturally 
we will endeavor to keep step 
with them if there should be any 

effort to break our rules.” 


Information of the plan to put “Pins 
and Needles” over as a road show be- 
yond the control of Equity came to 
The Billboard from sources other than 
the actors’ association. It was reported 
that the English revue, having flopped 
on Broadway, was to be taken back to 
London rather than butt against the 
stone wall constructed by the union 
players. Mr. DeCourville had been 
pointed out by Equity as unfair to labor 
in this country, and presumed that 
when the revue “folded” at the Shubert 
Theater that the storehouse here or in 
England would be the scene of the last 
act. 

Then came the news that the show was to get 
the Shubert vandeville booking and be sent out 
as a revue, There are members of Bquity in 
the chorus and the question as to the legality 
of working them in fourteen performances with- 
out pro-rata remuneration for the performances 
in addition to the eight shows called for in an 
Equity contract was what started the argu- 
ment and resulted in the prediction that the 
anion ‘“‘would have something to say about 
that.” It was said that in addition the chorus 
girle would have to furnish their own shoes 
and stockings, a point also important to Equity 
members. 

Now the issue is: “Can ‘Pins and Needles,’ 
produced as a revue in New York and in con- 
troversy with Equity, work Equity members 


~ 


EXPLOITING THE HUMAN FORM 


Competing with the elaborate stage 
effects used in motion picture studios, and 
with the expense and skill lavished on 
the costumes of movie actresses, there has 
of late been a very marked improvement 
in the staging and costuming of vande- 
ville acts. 

The old knock-about girl acts have gone, 
,in their place, all the vaudeville houses 
are showing really high-class acts, with 
only one defect: a too great exploiting of 
the human form. 

Many a good act is weakened by the 
sudden projection into the scene of a young 
actress with instructions to display a pair 
of ordinarily hidden charms one wou'd nev- 
er suspect her of possessing when she 
walks abroad in street dress and raincoat. 

Girls look prettier when dressed ade- 
quately and dancing gracefully than when 
they are brought on the stage in a dis- 
habille verging on the grotesque. 

Should a dance be of such a nature that 
it “ill not be made attractive by the 
pretty faces and pretty ankles of the dan- 
cers, there is small hope of adding to its 
attractive force by increasing the areas 
displayed. 

Vaudeville will increase in popularity in 
the proportion in which its managers show 
respect for their employees and for those 
sanctions of civilized life which allot to 
womanhood a charm of reticence and & 
delicacy of expression, which, in the phys- 
ical life, extend to a careful, tho ever so 
bright and attractive, a mode of dress 
which tends to preserve the ideal of fem- 


inine modesty without sacrificing its 
charm.—VANCOUVER (B. ©.) DAILY 
SUN, 


more than eight performances without extra 
pay?” 

Several efforts have been made to get vaude- 
ville players into Equity and under Equity pro- 
tection, and there are those who say that this 
presentation of “Pins and Needles’ on the 
road as vaudeville will be the wedge that will 
open wide the Equity book of rules either for 
a definite reading of the law or a revision. 

The question, *‘When is a revue not a revue?’ 
and the answer, ‘“‘When it’s in vaudeville,"” has 
raised another question: ‘‘When is vaudeville 
not vaudeville?” This may be answered as a 
result of this DeCourville booking. 


“ZILLAH” TENDERED SURPRISE 


Chicago, March 11.—‘‘Zillah, the Gir) With 
the X-Ray Eyes,”’ in private, Mrs. Tom Ran- 
kine, of this city, now touring vaudeville cir- 
cuits, was tendered a birthday surprise on the 
night of March 6, at Arkansas City, Kan., by 
other members of the bill on which she was 
appearing. Everybody enjoyed the big spread 
provided, and all ch'pped in and contributed 
a neat present to “Zillah.” 

Those who took part in the festivities were, 
in addition to “Zillah” herself, Angelo Ar- 
mento, tumbler; Guyette Sisters, harmony s!ng- 
ers; Rottach & Miller, comedians, and Tony 
Denocenzo, concertina. 


The Arkansas City Daily News praised the 
bill, giving specia] mention to “Zillab.’’ 


Yj 
Y Yj, 


Yj 
YY GY 


) VAUDEVILLE REVUES RAISE EQUITY POINT 


VAUDE. ACTS 
In Demand in Outdoor Amusement 
Field 


Vaudeville will find itself shy of novelty acts 
this summer, if the outdoor showman's per- 
ennial prediction of ‘‘the greatest season ever” 
comes true—and, for the first time in several 
years, every indication points in that direction. 
While the amusement business has suffered 
along with other industries during the past 
season, as a result of nation-wide economie de- 
pression, outdoor showmen are confident that 
this summer will not only mark a return to 


normalcy, but also a step toward a greater 
prosperity in the field of open-air entertain- 
ment, 


Accord'ng to old showmen, never before has 
there been so great an activity in fair and 
park bookings. Where in seasons past three or 
four free attractions sufficed, full programs of 
standard feature attractions will be the rule 
this season. Consequently, book'ng agents are 
turning to vaudeville for the material 
needed to meet the increased demand, Every 
type of novelty attraction suitable for out- 
door exhibition w'll be needed. 

Among some of the standard vaudeville nov- 
elties that have already been booked for fair 
and park engagements this summer are: 

Joe Jackson, Bonesetti Troupe, Moll Brothers, 


Jeanette’s Monkeys, Castellos, International 
Nine, Strassle Seals, Portia Sisters, Garland and 
Smith, Four Roses, Mlle. Beretta, Daring 


Cromwells, Kate Mullni and Five Royal Hus- 
sars, Ce Dora, Mongadors, Bert Earle and 
Girls, Loretta’s Bears, Mohl, Jester and Mohl, 
Janslys, Berlo Sisters, Four Diaz, Aerial Mayos, 
Gillett’s Monks, Ducos Brothers, Willo and 
Lillo, Eresttos, Zeno, Moll and Carl, Margaret 
Hill's Society Circus, Elizabeth Roderick, Nine 
Sons of Desert, Tokiu Murata, American Quartet, 
Tokyu Troupe, Wills Circus, Poodles and Dot- 
tie, Charles Siegrist Troupe, Olympia Desvall 
and Company, Ankar Trio, Seror Trio, Apollo 
Tr‘'o, Three 


Hamiltons, Mirano Brothers, 
Travellas, alton Sisters, Watson's Dogs, 
Johnny Reilly, Riva and Noble and Rolland 
Brothers, 


MISS DOLLY SUED 
FOR UNPAID NOTE 


New York, March 11.—Miss Dolly, younger 
of the dancing team known as the Dolly 
Sisters, who recently returned from London to 
fulfill a $25,000 contract in Keith vaudeville, 
was served this week with papers in a suit’ 
by Ray Comstock, partner of Morris Gest 
for alleged nonpayment of a $5,000 promissory 
note signed by the dancer on Apri] 15, 1920. 

In addition to the demand for the principal 
Comstock, thru his attorney, Will'am Klein, 
asks the Supreme Court to award him an 
additional $1.29, representing the amount paid 
the bank when the note went to protest. 


The Dollys are scheduled to sail for London 
shortly. 


SHUBERT VAUDEVILLE 
AT ST. PAUL, MINN. 


St. Paul, Minn., March 10.—Beginning on 
Sunday night, the Shubert vaudev'lle acts en- 
tered St. Paul, being staged at the New Pal- 
ace Theater by arrangement with Finkelstein 
and Ruben, who own the house. Charles W. 
Morgenstern, recently made general manager of 
the Shubert Chicago office after being brought 
west by the St. Paul movie magnates, will be 
the booker for the New Palace, 


MAGNOLIA GARDENS SOLD 


Louisville, Ky., March 9.—The Magnolia 
Gardens here, which was formerly owned by 
Cc. C. Emerich, L. A. Broddus, Clify Gorman 
and Terry Swan, was sold to Wm. Young, 
formerly a roadhouse proprietor at Bardstown, 
Ky., who took possession March 1. The regular 
policy of a dance hall with luncheon service 
will be adhered to for the present. Swan's 
Wonder Orchestra will continue with the new 
management. 


WANT PAY FOR 
RADIO CONCERTS 


Actors’ Equity Association 
Adopts Resolution Advising 
Members To Seek 
Compensation 


Following the publication in The Billboard 
two weeks ago of a warning to the effect that 
the free concerts sent broadcast by the radio 
phone companies were injuring show business, 
the Actors’ Equity Association last week went 
on record as opposed to its members giving 
ethereal performances without proper compen- 
sation. A resolution to this effect, adopteq by 
the council of the Actors’ Equity, read: 

RESOLVED: That the attention of 
our members be drawn to the fact that 
the radiophone is a profitable commer- 
cial enterprise, which also in a way 
enters into competition with the the- 
ater, and that therefore our members 
be advised to seek proper compensa- 
tion for any services they may be in- 
vited to give to the radiophone com- 
panies. 

In explaining the Equity stand in regard to 
what they term the ‘‘radiograft.’"’ Mr. Pau) 
Dullzell, assistant executive secretary, says: 

“The General Electric Company and the 
Westinghouse people have been getting in on 
a lot of good stuff for nothing. Also the gen 
eral electrical appliance houses. The radio 
concerts are a money making scheme and the 
artists who make them possible should be com 
pensated. 

“Heretofore the understanding bas been that 
the advertising afforded the actor and the 
singer is of great advantage to them. For 
instance, they are told impressively that an 
@udience of 400,000 has its ears clamped to 
the receiving apparatus all over the land and 
sea, 

“TI can see where the vaudeville managers 
flready have just complaint. If this thing 
grows—and jt bids fair to assume enormous 
proportions—there will soon be no incentive to 
go to the theaters. When andiences can heat 
everything in their own homes they won't 
have to go out to be entertained. What they 
will miss in stage settings and the personality 
of the actor will be made up by the novelty 
of the radiophone itse'f. 

“We considered this a matter of such {m- 
portance that at the meeting of the council 
last week it was resolved to suggest to our 
members that they seek compensation for 
ethereal performances.”’ 

BE, F. Albee, head of the Keith Circuit, in 
an interview with a daily paper this week was 
quoted as saying that appearances for the 
radiophone by Keith artists was a violation 
of contract. 


WALTER READE BUYS 
PROCTOR, N. J., THEATER 


New York, Merch 11.—Walter Reade this 
week purchased from the Stillman Estate of 
Plainfield, N. J., the F. F. Proctor Theater 
there at a cost of $200,000, 

Reade is also owner of the Strand Theater 
in that city and, with the acquisiton of the 
Proctor house, now bas control thruout the 
State of New Jersey of thirteen theaters, 
sitaated in Asbury Park, Long Branch, Plain- 
field, New Brunswick and Trenton. This 
makes him the largest Individual theater 
owner in the State. 


FRANCES KENNEDY AT HOME 


Chicago, March 8.—Frances Kennedy '* | 
spend'ng a half week at ber home. She will 
resume her vaudeville tour tomorrow, in Dave®- 
port, Ia.. and Monday will return for the week 
at the State-Lake, 


a ren as ne 
} T d é 
he Billboar ) a 
q 
" eer ties ES LS yap 
Ht 
y Yy YY YYy y Yyy Y t Yyjyyyyyw“y UJ y / UY 4$$)WJYyjjyyywwWqmq@quaquau<«“{\w(j YY YY Y 
A ; YY YY yy yf Mi yyyaddddddddddéd/ WWMM YY Hf yy // fap ly YY fy 
Yj Y Yi Y Y Yi YY Uj Y, Yy Yj Yj Yj 
Y YY Yyy Wy Y fy ffyy YY =U yy y WY Yfy i fj Yy l 
j ty YYyf UY YY YW; YY YY, yf Yi YUyYy JY Yj fy UY YY y Yj 
Yyy Yy Yfyy YY fy Uy , YY Uf Yy J} Uy Gy YY fy wae oY 
Yy yf Yj Yo a Q§0A VippF4//341V},1 YY Yi Yy 
1) Y yy fj Y . Yj UY YYyy Yfy Y fy Y cveeehee. Ql 
1 HH7f yy yy Y Y YY ff Jfuyy fy Uy YY Z 
; YY an, M4) ee MY yyy WA//p : Yffy wy y YY py JJJJUj}3) YY yyy y Y 
i; Yyyy Yy fy Yfyy YY —Y Yy yy Yy Yj y YY UY YY yj Uff YY YY Yj Yi Uy Uy Y Y YY yyy 4, Vy Y Y Hf fy 
4 
| ee 
f 
. 
anal NS a a ee 
if — -~— 
Pe a 
vi 
if —— = 
tC 
att 
a Ee i 
Hi 
a4 
a A, 
te 5 
: 
—— 
Po 
abe 
| ae 
; 
, ee 
; 
: 
‘ 
j ‘ Pe 
j 
. ; Pe 
: 
$$ 
: oe 
Pun’ 2 i 
‘ss 
j 
| \ Y 
‘ 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


‘MORRIS GEST LIFTS VAUDEVILLE TO $5 TOP 


Producer of Spectacles Proves That Art Pays Best 


in Any Sort of Entertainment 


New York, March 13—E. F. Albee, generally admitted to be the 
master mind of vaudeville, has been charged by Morris Gest, producer 
of spectacles and seeker after novelty in the theater, with the responsi- 


bility of advancing the vaudeville 
form of entertainment 


Gest offered this challenge to the 

“E, F, Albee would do well to 
order posted in every dressing 
room of the B. F. Keith and allied 
theaters a notice advising every 
performer to buy a ticket ta 
‘Chauve-Souris’ and learn what 
the future holds for the vaude- 
ville entertainer. For from this 
company of players | have dared 
to bring over from Europe, where 
other American theatrical mana- 
gers saw them and scorned them 
as a ‘business proposition,’ the 
vaudeville performer, if he will, 
can get the real angle on vaude- 
ville of the future.” 


Mr. Gest was seen during intermis- 
sion at the Forty-ninth Street Theater, 
where “Chauve-Souris” is playing to 
standing room only at every perform- 
ance, including three matinees a week, 
despite the scale of five dollars top 
which is asked and received. 


Vaudeville in Reality 


The lobby of the little theater was crowded 
with men in evening clothes and the lower floor 
was dotted with opera cloaks and head adora- 
ments that reminded of a section of the Metro- 
politan. These people had come to witness 
what was in fact a vaudeville show presented 
by Russians, in Russian and originally for 
Russians. And the Russians in the audience 
were few and for the most part scattered thru- 
out the balcony. 


Before talking with Mr. Gest the writer had 
Seen the first half of the show and so for the 
better understanding of the reader let us take 
our seats and see what these Russians, who 
originally organized the enter‘ainment for their 
own amusement after the theater, have that 
the American vaudeville theater does not offer 
at a much lower price than five dollars top. 


Looking over the program, which is all that 
really is necessary, altho a souvenir Paris edi- 
tion of the show printed in English and in 
colors is hawked in the lobby, one reads: 

F. RAY COMSTOCK AND MORRIS GEST 

Have the Honor To Present 
For the First Time in America and for a 
Limited Fngagement 
BATIEFF’S CHATVE-SOTRIS 
(Bat Theater of Moscow) 
Overture...... Chef d'Orchestre, M. Elie Zlatin 

From the dimming of the lights and the first 
down-beat of the conductor of the unpronounec- 
able name one senses, even before the rise of 
the house curtain reveals the very Russian drop, 
that there is something different and that if it 
is to be vaudeville someone remembered that 
a well-balanced orchestra with a competent man 
at the desk is as important to a vaudeville 
bill as it is to a musical comedy. 


Then Comes Balieff 


The latecomers, fewer and fewer with each 
Performance because of the passing along of 
the word not to miss a minute, ease into their 
Seats with whispered apologies for clashing with 
the music. Imagine apologizing for anything 
save corn-crushing during the overture in most 
vaudeville houses as we know them! 

The rise of the Bat Theater drop discloses a 
Diack velvet split drop lighted only from the 
“foots” and not too brightly. The cymbal 
crash of the overture dies away and there fs a 
moment of silence, Not a rustling of program 
is heard, not even a congh. And just at the 
point where everyone is holding his breath to 
choke back the throat-tickling of a recent bat- 
tle with “flu’? or “fin'? medicine comes Ralleff. 

Thra the fold of the black velvet steps this 
master of masters of ceremonies, and for longer 
than another would dare stand there he waits— 
the moon man come to Broadway and dressed 
in conventional Broadway attire. Bventually, 
and no one presumes to ask ‘Why, not now?” 
he moves an eyebrow and seems to be about to 
condescend a smile. But there {ts plenty of 
time for that. He looks us over a Mttle more, 
individually, collectively, pointedly, but never 
familiarly, never jnsultingly, never belittlingly, 


show until it becomes the highest 


In a statement made to The Billboard Mr. 


reigning power in vaudeville: 


Vaudeville 1922 
By MORRIS GEST 


What E. F. Albee and others have 
been doing for vaudeville during the 
last twenty years is one step. Mr. 
Balieff, with his ideas of variety en- 
tertainment, is twenty years ahead 
of his time. 

Every vaudeville performer in the 
United States should be glad to pay 
for a seat to see Chauve-Souris and 
Mr. Albee should advise every per- 
former to see it, 

From this entertainment the per- 
former can get the real angle on 
vaudeville of the future. 

Vaudeville is something more than 
a box-office proposition. 

Art in any kind of entertainment 
will pay eventually. 

Vaudeville patrons demand more 
than they are getting and are will- 
ing to pay for it. ; 

“Tryouts” don’t prove what an 
artist can do. 

Building fine theaters is only one 
step in the advancement of vaude- 
ville. Why stop there? 

Art is always poor. 

Vaudeville is the greatest medium 
for entertainment. 

The Shuberts will accomplish much 
for vaudeville. 

- They, too, can learn much from 
M. Balieff. 
Vaudeville has much to learn. 


By JED FISKE 


never with that insolent attitude of superiority 
with which certain of our own entertainers put 
an audience in its place. Never once does 
Balieff cross that line beyond which familiarity 
becomes contempt. His andience is his from 
the moment he steps before his black velvet, his 
moonface in bas-relief, and altho that step 
brings him in intimate contact with his audi- 
ence he never oversteps. 

Balieff never insults the intelligence of his 
eudience by “playing down to them.”’ Rather 
does he appear to trust that his is not an in- 
trusion and the result is that no apologies ever 
become necessary, 


“Ladies and Gentlemen” 

Finally he speaks. “Ladies and gentlemen,”’ 
he roars with an inimitable accent that sets the 
audience immediately at ease. We do not 
laugh at him, we laugh with him, 
and, having accomplished his purpose. 
which is to increase our desire to hear 
more and eventually—and_ still no one 
asks “Why not now?''—to see what he has in 
store for us behind that black velvet drop, he 
introduces himself. He tells us he is Nikita 
Ralleff, director of the Bat Theater, Moscow; 
that he cannot speak English, which*we have 
to accept, but cannot quite believe; that we are 
THE most appreciative of audiences, and before 
we show our willingness to swallow this he 
puts sugar on it by telling us he says that 
same to every audience before which he ap- 
pears. We are in excellent spirits by now 
and are quite ready to have him explain “the 
first number on the program,"’ called ‘‘Porce- 
laine de Saxe.’’ 

It is the most delightful ballyhoo we ever 
have heard and we are so interested in Balieff 
we forget what he is presenting until, without 
warning, he turns his back upon us without so 
much asa thank you or a go-to-the-dickens and 
disappears thru the fold of black velvet, and the 
orchestra takes up “Porcelaine de Saxe,"’ the 
house lights are down and the black velvet drop 
is parted. 

Against another black drop stands an old 
French porcelain clock, blue and white and pink 
and gold and back-lighted softly to create a 
charming Mlusion, As the music—from an ol@ 


French song, “Sur le pont d’Avignon’’—reaches 
the striking of the hour two figures, a man and 
a maid dressed in the fashion of a century ago, 
step from the base of the clock into dance, 
which is described in the program as follows* 
In the hours of night when all the 
world is asleep, when dreams and old 
recollections rule, a mysterious life 
quickens the objects about us. Tender 
strains of olden melodies tell us of 
bygone days, of laughter, of tears, and 
in the haunting twilight the little 
porcelain figures come to life and live 
over again, in the romance of ancient 
days reviving the echoes of the past. 
But. the clock strikes. . . and they once 
again become just ‘“Porcelaines de 
Saxe,”’ trifles of beauty created by the 
master hand of an artist. 

The program tells us that the man and the 
maid are represented by Mmes. Dianina and 
Karabanova and that the costumes and sur- 
roundings are by Nicholas Remisoff, and to them 
all credit is due for as delightful a number 
one vaudeville act as we have seen in many a 
day. It has been approached with spotlights 
and cycloramas by certain variety artists over 
here, but for simplicity, taste, charm and music 
setting it truly jis advanced vaudeville. And, 
more jmportant still, when the idea is put 
over and the orchestra has struck the hour 
once more the black velvet curtains are closed 
and Balieff is with us again. The act does not 
call for an encore and the enthusiastic audience 
is made to realize this, politely and quietly, by 
the master of ceremonies, 


Songs by Glinka 

“Next number on the pr-r-r-rogr’m,”” he roars 
as the applause dies away at his signaled re- 
request, ‘‘will be ‘Songs by Glinka.’ You know 
Glinka? No? Yes?’? He looks about the audi- 
ence witth his interesting eyebrows raised in- 
quiringly and getting no response continues: 
“No? Then I tell you about the gr-r-r-reat 
man.’ He does, and, when he makes certain 
that no one in the house knows what he has 
been talking about, insists ‘‘Yes!” and dis- 
appears quickly with a shrug of his shoulders, 
which seem to ask: “Who cares? We'll show 
you.”” 

Whereupon the lights dim again, the black 
velvet is drawn away and there is discovered 
a balcony scene at night, with more intriguing 
back light and two women in crinolines and 
severely parted hair—one at the old rosewood 
and gilt-lined piano against which the other 
stands. The one at the piano is playing as 
the scene is disclosed and the orchestra is 
silent. We wished we could understand tne 
words of the song they sang. We've wished it 
before when listening to our own singers who 
did not have the advantage of presentation 
such as is accorded Mmes. Birse and Ershova in 
these songs by Glinka. After the first, which 
might have been a Russian ‘‘Who Knows?” the 
curtains are drawn and an encore is accepted 
during which the strains of a cello come from 
the orchestra pit. The program mentions M. 
Gorodetsky as having something to do with 
this number. Perhaps his was the cello. We 
didn’t inquire. We were so enraptured that we 
didn’t bother until later to learn that the cos- 
tumes and scenery were by S. Sondetkine and 
didn’t come out of our trance until the moon- 
face appeared again from the cloud of black 
velvet. 


“Next number on pr-r-r-rogr’m,”’ challenged 
Balieff, and paused until we were thoroly awake 
again to our surroundings, “Parade of Wood-en 
Soldiers.” Out of sight he was with the tap 
of the music director’s baton and to the sure 
rhythm of a march that may have been Russian, 
but seemed more like the unforgetable martial 
tunes of the French soldiers, was disclosed a 
setting that reminded us of the toy fortresses 
in white that we once achieved with our box 
of blocks, and in marched our own toy infantry- 
men grown to our own size with the years. The 
effect was so startling that all of us in the 
audience forgot ourselves and were rude enough 
to show our appreciation with premature ap- 
plause. Prrm-prrm-prrm-prrm came this squad 
of tormen so perfectly drilled that they all 
might have been attached to the same block of 
wood and manipulated by a single string, Prrm- 
prrm-prrm-prrm they marched and moved their 
heads and drilled and the drummer boy 
drummed and then. as they were about to top- 
ple over as they did when the sandman used to 
come and we let the string fall from our re- 
laxing fingers, the black velvet curtains were 
closed and the applause drowned ont the efforts 
of the suddenly appearing Balieff until he was 
forced to shout ‘‘Encore!’’ and get out of the 
way so the whole drill could be done over again. 


This sort of vaudeville has to be seen. It 
can't be described. The soldiers in real life 
are M. M. Birse, Boreo, Davidoff, Kotchetovsky, 
Malakoff, Marievsky, Pons, Stoianovsky and 


Zotoff and the act was conceived by Nicholas 
Remisoff. 


Contrast Is Offered 

Contrast is noticeable in the arrangement of 
the Balieff ‘‘bill’’. From the martial music of 
the wooden soldiers we go to the strains of 3 
music setting for a love scene between two 
ancients for wh'ch we, of course, ate prepared 
by Balieff and his increas’ngly friendly but not 
familiar introductions, He repeats that we are 
a nice audience, an understanding audience— 
“as I have said to all other audiences’’—and so 
we get next: “Souvenir of the Far Past," fea- 
turing Madame Deykarhanova and M. Gorodet- 
sky ‘vith costumes and surroundings by Rem- 
isoff. The charm of tbe program still holds 
with this love sccne with music and we are 
just at this point settling comfortably in 
our chairs again when Balieff introduces his 
Avon Comedy Four or, as the program an- 
nounces: ‘‘A quartet of Merry Art‘sts."” The 
orchestra takes up a lively air, with MM. Wa- 
vitch, Birse, Stoianovsky and Zotoff in cos- 
tumes as lively as their songs, which include 
enough ‘‘barbershops’’ to delight our most ez- 
acting vaudeville audiences. Thruout this num- 
ber Balieff remains upon the stage directing the 
audience with his eyebrows as surely as M. 
Zilatin directs his orchestra with bis baton. This 
is an ‘‘act’’ that every artist in vaudeville 
should use. In less minutes than the ordinary 
song requires these Russian artists put over 
more than a vaudeville act usally gets over in 
twenty minutes. It’s toc ‘unusual to describe 
and must be seen to be appreciated at all. 

No. 7 is called ‘‘Katinka’’, which is an of 
Russian polka of the ‘60s. In a setting sup- 
posed to represent the top of a toy music bor 
Mmes. Dian‘'na, Karabanova and M. Dalmstoff 
present the story of a too-modern daughter of a 
Russian merchant, and the daughter brings howe 
the polka which she has learned at boarding 
school. Here is another gem in costumes ana 
surroundings by 8. Soudeikine that is too de- 
lightful to describe in words. The music was 
still haunting us as we went to the lobby to 
keep an appointment with Morris Gest during 
intermission, 

“This is vaudeville, Mr. Gest,"” we said, by 
way of introduction. ‘‘Now we know why you 
get $5 a ticket for a variety entertainment, 
but we believe the readers of The Billboard 
would be interested in your idea of this as 
vaudeville entertainment.’ 


Gest Trained in Vaude. 

“I know this is variety entertainment, but 
whether it is vaudeville I am not ready to 
say,’ said the producer, who found Chauve- 
Souris in Paris and brought it intact to New 
York. ‘I do know, however, that what EB. P. 
Albee and others have been do'ng for vaudeville 
during the last twenty years is but one step 
and that M. Balieff, with h’s ideas of variety 
entertainment, is twenty years ahead of his 
time. 

“Every vaudeville performer in the United 
States should be glad to pay for a seat to see 
this show, and Mr. Albee would do well to 
order posted in every dressing room of the B. 
F. Keith and all'ed theaters a notice advising 
every performer to buy a ticket to Chauve- 
Souris and learn what the future holds for the 
vaudeville entertainer. 

“For from this company of players I have 
dared to bring over from Europe, where other 
American theatrical managers saw them and 
scorned them as a business proposition, the 
vaudeville performer, if he will, can get the 
real angle on vaudeville. 

“The charm of M. Balieff, a man who with 
great difficulty makes himself understood in 
English, is the charm of Chauve-Souris as a 
whole, and this entertainment can be held up 
as a model from which all may learn. 

“‘Some will say this {is not vaudeville. Some 
will say that our own vaudeville is far bet- 
ter than this. These are entitled to their 
opinions. They will say this is revolutionary. 
True. Why not? It was born of a revolution 
and is some of the good that has risen out 
of revolution. 

“It js not commercial vandeville. We did not 
expect $5 vaudeville wou!d pay so quickly. 
We wanted to show America that vandeville 
is something more than a box-office proposition; 
that art in any kind of entertainment will 
pay eventually. The fact that Chauve-Souris 
has caught on so quickly proves to us much 
sooner than we expected that we were right; 


(Continued on page 30) 


— 


| 
-- on | 
“AT 
=i 
fF { 
= ; 
i} 
| 


“TF FT ES EET 


re 


ia 


26 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


This Week’s Reviews of Vaudeville Theaters 


P Apollo, Chicago 


(Reviewed Sunday Matinee, March 12) 


The weather was so inviting today that even 
a bill of wonderful fash couldn't pack ‘em in. 
The house was two-thirds full. 

Jack Horton and Mile. La Triska, the clown 
and the human doll, have a novelty opening in 
cabinets back stage, prettily set, and the girl 
does a remarkable doll im‘tation for ten min- 
utes, relaxes for three minutes in a dance b't, 
end returns to the doll for closing. The 
clown, of course, plays up the girl, and fourteen 
minutes was worth while and two Te- 
ceived. Hearty applause. 

George Mullen and Ed Corelli, doing a l'ne of 
acrobatic comedy, songs and dance steps. Old- 
timers with an easy delivery, fun that lands, 
and fair team work. Thirteen minutes, two 
bows. 

Fred Ria} and Maia Lindstrom, a shrewdly 
disguised ring act, using parasols with books at 
one end and rings at the other. The girl 
does the rng work in all except the close, 
when Rial, who is a nut comedian of elongated 
physique, pulls some quick thrillers, The style 
and personality of the pair is worthy of note. 
Ten minutes, two bows 

White Way Tr'‘o, Messrs. Buckley, Sharples 
and Bisland, do thirteen minutes of song, char- 
acter songs and stepping. Open with ‘*’Tucky 
Home’ and close with a parodied chorus of 
“Leave Me With a Smile’. Singing average 
and team work above average. Three bows, 
and narrowly escaped stopping the show. 

Peggy Marsh, with Buster Johnson and Peggy 
Marsh Quintet. An act evidently quickly as- 
sembled to capitalize the notoriety of the fea- 
tured girl. A series of ballroom dances, with 
trimmings, and a jazz quintet of ordinary 
ability, the sax. player and violinist doing the 
most work. An apache dance, which closes, 
got laughs thru some harmless rough handling 
of the girl. Peggy berself is gracious and 
winsome, and four curtains were the result. 
Fifteen minvtes, 

Intermission and Shubert News Weekly. 

A. Robins, walking music store, in ten 
m‘nutes of vocal imitations of various instru- 
ments, getting many laughs with his musical 
equipment. Encored with his violin virtuoso 
burlesque, which went over. Two bows. 

Clark and McCullough, “Chuckles of 1921'’, 
fineluding White Way Trio, Jack Edwards, 
Charlies Mac and Emily Earle, Ruth Wheeler 
and Dolly Manuel. The girls who do the 
specialty work are not aS capable as the men. 
Sine'ng is inconsequential as done by the fem- 
inine portion. All in all, the Clark and McCul- 
long rerue gives much room for the laughable 
antics of Bobby Clark, and a good-looking 
chorus carries the rest, aside from a manicure 
bit well done by Emily Earle, and the boxing 
scene, wh'ch pnts itself across. One hour, 18 
minutes.—LOUIS 0. RUNNER. 


Loew’s State, New York 
(Reviewed Monday Matinee, March 18) 


The vandeville had a good chance at the andi- 
ence today at the State, for the excessive mile- 
age of ‘“‘The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse” 
caused the show to start late and thus get a full 
house. 

The Three Kanazama Boys started the ball 
rolling with a splendid juggling act. They 
speciajize in kicking barrels around the land- 
seape and do it exceedingly well. Earned 
@ big hand for the finish. 

Howard and Brown, a colored singing and 
dancing team, followed. Miss Brown sang 
jazzily and Howard danced with much ski'l. 
The inevitable “Dapper Dan’’ was sung and 
got over as tho it had never been heard in 
this house, which, as a matter of fact, gets it 
weckly. Scored a sizable hit. 

“Stateroom Nineteen,’’ a comedy sketch with 
special set, was next. The dialog and action 
18 all worked up for the final gag, which is 
a big laugh. Aside from this there is little 
to the act. The audience laughed at most of 
the points and one skit was well played, but 
it is a pretty thin vehicle and could stand 
a dea} of strengthening. 

Hank Brown and Company had the next spot, 
and Hank made them laugh with a stuttering 
bit that was well done. The company, a girl 
with a fair voice, sang a number or two 
effectively, and then Hank made them laugh 
some more. He is a first-rate comedian with 
a sure method of landing points and had no 
difficulty in amusing the audience. Finished a 
big hit. 

“The Sunbeam Follies,"" two men ang two 
girls, closed the show. Of course, this act has 
a set of drapes and they started singing in a 
set of Chinese costumes. This made the out- 
look pretty dark, but the turn improved as it 
went along. There was some good dancing by 
the boys, one of the girls played the fiddle pase- 
ably well, and the other girl sang a solo very 
aweetly. AN hands joined forces for a 
harmonized exit finish which scored solidly and 
made an encore necessary. Altogether a very 
good act of this type-—GORDON WHYTE. 


* 


NEW wORK 


al -B.F. KEITH'S _ 
E PALACE 


PROGRAM 


Orchestra ial 
Three Lordons 


Elmer El Cleve 
Runaway Four 

| Leavitt and Lockwood 
6 | Vaughn Comfort 

‘TI Dotty _Sisters 
8 | Topics of the Day 
9 | Mosconj Bros. 
0 | Bobby Higgins 
11 | Marion Harris 
12 | Dooley and Sales 


There’s a so-so bill at the Palace this week. Rosie and Jenny, The Sisters 
Dolly, top it. To the Mosconis, however, went the applause hit of the Monday 
afternoon show. They stopped it cold, rivaling the record set at this house a 
few weeks back by Wells, Virginia and West. And, as for the Dollys, their 
$25,000 contract is nearly up. Englishized American products never did set 
well with us. It’s too bad, however, they had to miss Princess Mary’s wedding. 
We bet the King will never forgive them for leaving the royal family in the 
lurch, 

1—Too much brass and percussion will be the undoing of Benny Roberts 
if he doesn’t look out. A vaudeville orchestra does not necessarily have to be 
a brass band. Now that the Palace has got a competent director in the pit, it 
should go a step farther in the interest of better music and add a few more 
strings. 

2—The fast-moving high bar casting exhibition of the Three Lordons sent 
them over with a bang. This is, perhaps, the best act of its kind in vaudeville. 

3—Elmer El Cleve and his xylophone led the orchestra a merry chase in 
the second spot. Cleve is assisted, or rather hindered, by a song plugger from 
a box. It is really too bad that Cleve should stoop to anything so cheap, 

4—The Runaway Four is truly a surprise. Their scarecrow opening is a 
downright novelty. These lads—four gobs—are a versatile crew. They sing 
quite acceptably, dance rather cleverly, and for a getaway go into a routine 
of whirlwind acrobatics that would do credit to a troupe of Dervishes. 

5—Douglas Leavitt and Ruth Mary Lockwood have a rather diverting 
little skit in “Ourselves.” It is just crammed full of wholesome witticisms and 
laughable situations. They are assisted by Brother Ray, who may be a star 
tomorrow. Vaudeville could do well with more acts of this caliber. 

6—Vaughn Comfort ought to go back to blackface. He is now posing as 


an Irish tenor. McCormack need not sit up nights worrying about it how- 
ever. 


7I—Dolly Sisters. 

8—Topics of the Day. 

9—The Mosconis, making their first appearance at this house since Sister 
Verna sustained injuries in a fall to the Palace stage a month or so ago, ran 
away with the show. 

10—Bobby Higgins has a funny hick farce in “Oh, Chetney.” It’s a bit 
snappy, by heck, but, then, it’s so natural one can hardly censor it for being so. 
It proved the laughing hit of the show. 

11—Marion Harris is billed as “The Favorite Phonograph Record Maker.” 
We felt that our education had been sadly neglected. We never heard of her 


before this afternoon. But, then, we don’t play her kind of songs on our phono- 
graph. We have too much regard for it. 


12—J. Francis Dooley and Corinne Sales, in a tough spot, watched the 


audience walk—EDWARD HAFFEL 


Orpheum, St. Louis 


(Reviewed Monday Matinee, March 13) 


Nellie and Josephine Jordan dance, sing a 
song or two and perform on the slack wire. 
[C'ght minutes, full stage; three bows. 

Fred Bernard and Sid Garry, two peppy im- 
dividuals, who sing Southern songs and exe- 
eute flashing dances. Eleven minutes, in one; 
three bows. 


William Halligan in “‘Highlowbrow,”’ three 
short, vivid sketches from De Maupassant, 
Dunsany and O, Henry. Well presented in 
an entirely new manner. The ease and resonance 
of the speaking voices of Mr. Halligan and 
Glen White and their careful pronunciation of 
words, especially in their telephone conversa- 
tion, is way above the average. Nineteen 
minutes, full stage; six bows; good applause 
thruout. 

Jim Toney and Ann Norman have a conven- 
tional line of patter and song. Tony's hesi- 
tating flops won good applause and laughter. 
Twenty-one minutes, in one; four bows. 

Mildred Harris in “Getting the Money,” a 
stock playlet with no thrille and little interest. 
The transformation of Miss Harris from an as- 
tonishingly ignorant country girl to a stun- 
ning debutante in three weeks’ time causes a 
little feminine excitement, but honors for act- 
ing go to S. Miller Kent. Nineteen minutes, 
full stage. 

Stan Stanley and Company have a new ver- 
sion of how to get on the stage in no lessons, 
which takes place in the audience most of the 
time. Their offering was very interesting and 
won much laughter and solid appleuse. 

Tosefsson’s Icelanders, a remarkable exhibi- 
tion of self-defense and fjiv-jiten after the 
Icelandic fashion. This act could be two hours 


——— 


long and stil) bold interest and be exciting. 


Six minutes, full stage; four bows.—ALLEN 
CENTER. 


SHUBERT VAUDEVILLE TO 
BE DROPPED IN BALTIMORE 


Baltimore, Md., March 10.—Sweeping changes 
provided in the new policy developing from 
the pooling of the Shubert and Erlanger the- 
atrical interests will begin after next week 
when Shubert vaudeville in Baltimore will, 
for a time at least, be dropped. It was an- 
nounced jast night that after the coming week 
the new Academy of Music will offer film at- 
tractions during the remainder of the season. 

The program virtually adopted at a recent 
conference between officials of the merged firms 
will call for changes next season, by which 
the Shubert and Erlanger road attractions will 
come to the Academy, where Harry A. Henkel, 
former manager of that house, will be rein- 
stated. At that time Shubert vaudeville will 
be revived and, according to present plans, 
will, in spite of repeated denials, be presented 
at Ford's Opera House. Members of the Ford 
family, when this project was first considered, 
declared emphatically that they were not bound 
by the terms of lease to allow this radical 
ebange and that they would most vigorously 
oppose it. There followed rumors that Ford's 
would be purchased ontright, but this was 
denied most emphatically by the present 
owners. 

Meanwhile the Shuberts are going ahead with 
Ford's in m'nd an next season's vaudeville 
house. 


IRENE CASTLE A BIG HIT 


Detroit, March 12.—During a fortnight stay 
in this eity Irene Castie’s nimble heels have 


Majestic, Chicago 
(Reviewed Monday Matinee, March 13) 
—_e_— 

“ Rose, Ellis and Rose opened the bill, and as 
‘Jumping Jacks" they probably have no equal 
in their line. To say that their stunts approach 
the hair-raising variety is putting it very mila. 
ly. Many in the audience actually covered their 
eyes as the trio pulled some of their dare-deyi! 

cleverness. great opener. 

Jack Joyce, the boy with the smile, got away 
with a terrible handicap. He has strung his 
emiles into a laugh and when laughing at his 
own jokes he makes hard work for himself. As 
& dancer he is marvelously clever, and after 
his struggle with jokes he gets away with his 
offering on its merits. His humor is amateur. 
ish, but as a dancer he is very entertaining and 
shows class for one being compelled to work 
under the handicap of having left a leg in 
France. 

Grace Huff and Company, in a one-act com- 
edy, “‘The Trimmer,”’ presents a manicure par- 
lor sketch that is well written, even to using 
the telephone legitimately, and is better acted. 
It is full of entertaining situations, with a great 
many a eas Gee Mi, ent wes well vp 


Gertrude Moody and Mary Duncan opened 
with a batch of personal bantering and badger- 
ing that consumed a lot of time with uncertain 
results, but their individual offerings got by 
and compelled attention by all the lovers of 
the cabaret and its form of entertainment. 
Their broad burlesque nut stuff sent them home 
to a good finish, Two bows and an encore won 
more applause, 

Tarzan, the most human animal ever seen 
on the stage, that seems to have the time of its 
life while it is entertaining the audience. This 
is an act that all parents and teachers should 
see, and Mr. Bryan and thirty-one members of 
the Kentucky Legislature should study. 

Joe Browning preaches a timely sermon that 
is a relic of the oldtime s:ump speech monolog 
that took brains to get up and brains to ap 
Ppreciate. He made a jot of fun for all. 

Fritzi Scheff, with August Kleinecke musical 
director, presented four concert numbers that 
Pleased, as this style of music usually does. 
Miss Scheff was at her best when she sang 
Victor Herbert's ‘‘Kiss Me Again.” This bit 
of real art sent her home for a tremendous 
encore. Her “‘Last Rose of Summer” proved 
to be another gem, and a little Negro lullaby 
was thrown in for good measure. 

William Demarest and Estelle Collette pre- 
Sent a nut act that is a combination of non- 
@ense, rough house and instrumental music, 
cleaning up for a real finish that almost stopped 
the show. 

Four Lamy Brothers, supreme aerialists, are 
worth missing the 5:15 to see. The humor drags 
the act, but they pull a number of real thrilling 
feats that entitle them to the billing they have. 
They held the audience right to the end.—FRED 
HIGH. 


Orpheum, San Francisco 


(Reviewed Sunday Matinee, March 12) 

A varied and unusually attractive bill was 
offered this afternoon, opening with Harry 
Kahne, mentalist, who does a number of mysti- 
fying stunts in mental gymnastics. 

In the second spot the “Bing Boys,"’ Miller 
and Mack, proved themselves a snappy pair of 
eccentric and dancing funmakers and took no 
less than three bows. 

Pat Rooney and Marion Bent, altho hold- 
overs, achieved headline honors despite the 
fact that they were up against keen compet!- 
tion in two spots. ‘Their vehicle, ‘Rings of 
Smoke,"’ is cleverly arranged, and, of course, 
they stopped the show. 

Keegan and O'Rourke, in a singing and 
talking act, seemed to please today’s andl- 
ence and were well received, taking a number 
of bows. Their comedy was exceedingly good. 

Hal Skelly, well-known musical comedy 
star, in a comedy skit entitled ‘The Mutual 
Man,” proved a riot. Mr. Skelly is supported 
by Ina Williams, Ida Kashner and Eunice 
Sauvain. The act is one of those that vies 
for headline honors and took half a dozen bows 
and much applause. 

Ruby Norton, a San Francisco girl, billed 
as “The Little Big Star of Song,”” came neat 
stopping the show and took nearly a dozen 
bows. 

Kinzo, clever Japanese juggler, closed the 
bill and held the audience by reason of bis 
clever work.—STUART B. DUNBAR. 


_ 


entertained more than 100,000 people. The eD- 
gagement, which originally was for one week 
at the Capitol, was extended with # week at 
the Adams, where business has continued tre- 
mendous at all performances. On Thursday 
Miss Castle visited Eastlawn Sanitarium where 
she danceq for 75 tubercular war veterans. 
giving each one of the boys an autograpbed 
photograph. A new addition to the sanitarium 
as dedicated during her visit and will be 
known as “Castle Cottage.” 


i = ee a 
t a 
" ee 
af 
it ae HE 2 AA ELE LORE SSS INIA A ANI a a 
a 
| : (Reviewed Monday Matinee, March 13) 
ft PERCENTAGE OF ENTERTAINMENT 
14 CES EEE I SO CO 
i Pre te 
3 SCOOT Pes 
| See 00 00000008. Gane 
| SSS0005 S00 20000\c058 
Af COCO ee 
i BEESEEESEE2S_aREeeEe 
i} Py eee 
# ee 
| PERE 
i, mums ee 
| eee <eneeee 
q BETES EET 
ty: 
" 
i 
3 
| ee 
|  —— 
i Ee ee cece nt eee 
PO pe 
| ese 
. ee : 
# ie , 
-— 
ye . 
H : 
: 
TL 
iis 
} i 
ee 
‘ 
4) 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Bi 


lliboard 


27 


From Coast to Coast by Special Wire 


(Beviewed Monday Matinee, March 13) 


A typical Lenten season audience sat thru 
the Shubert vaudeville program at the Winter 
Garden Monday afternoon cold and unresponsive 
for the most part until Bob Nelson, next to 
closing, brought them out of their coma and 
carried away the applause honors for the mat- 
inee. It required all the showmanship this en- 
tertainer possessed to do this seemingly im- 
possible stunt. The seat holders, fewer than 
usual, were as hard as picnic eggs in spite of 
the really excellent entertainment provided for 
them. 

After Mathieu Taflan and Claude Newell 
started off with a hodge-podge that wound up 
with some thrilling acrobatics Frank Jerome in- 
troduced a really unusual number two act that 
for stunts should pull up wide-eyed even the 
most blase of the twenty minutemen. Jerome 
helped himself to a bow that was coming to 
him but which wasn't called for by the audi- 
ence. It is only fair to Taflan and Newell to 
state that in trying to put over a ‘“‘different’* 
acrobatic act they have slowed up what might 
otherwise be a strong number one offering. 
They can “do the stuff," so why clutter up 
the act with back-room entertainment. 


Frederick Santley and His Melody Girls, 
perfectly spotted in No. 3 position, presented a 
pleasing act, for which the girls deserve much 
of the credit. Midge Morrison, Marie Reed 
and Nell Wood, play‘ng pianos simultaneously, 
add a novel touch to the offering, and Santley 
bas excellent additional support in Frances 
Vernon and Wynne Gibson, two charming and 
capable dancers. The act is tastefully staged 
by Ceballos, 


Ben Ryan and Harriette Lee were on before 
the audience woke up long enough to realize 
the Santley act was over, and got away well 
with good patter that called for a lot more ap- 
planse than they got. Then came tBe Han- 
nafords and ‘‘Poodles,"’ billed as “‘the world's 
greatest riding comedian."’ The act, about the 
same aS was seen at the Hippodrome for so 
long, must have annoyed the spectators for 
the cracking of the whip of the ring mistress. 
It is to be hoped that some show of appreci- 
ation will be given these really great perform- 
ers, at least at evening performances, for acts 
of this kind put considerable strain on mana- 
seria] bankrolls. Besides ‘‘Poodles” has a lot 
of tricks he wasn't called upon to show Mon- 
day afternoon. “The Talk of New York,” 
Conchita Piqur, was very much of a disappoint- 
ment, because she appeared only in two num- 
bers, both delightfully done. Her Spanish tem- 
per may have flared at the cold reception with 
which her art'st’e efforts were received, for 
efter the second number, a Spanish song and 
dance, she did not return, The audience 
evdently expected her to offer more. 
Press-time requirements precluded the possi- 
bility of trying to learn what happened. 
Her first number, “A Spanish Flower Boy,” 
in which she appeared dressed in trousers and 
tossed away cut flowers as she sang, was well 
done, and while Andy Byrne batted for Ray 
Miller, and with his orchestra—steadily being 
increased in size—put over a peppy jazz num- 
ber, she changed. This took much longer than 
usual in vaudeville, which may have had some- 
thing to do with her refusal to do more after 
the dance number in attractive Spanish cos- 
tume, While the audience waited the orches- 
tra got the signal for the next act, and Harry 
Masters and Jack Kraft, assisted by Bobby 
Dale, Rene Braham, Elsie Lamont and Grace 
Masters, presented their speedy dance revue. 
Even this excellent entertainment failed to get 
the applause it deserved, and {t remained for 
Aleen Bronson, assisted by Helen Hemingway, 
to soften the hearts of the anditors. Miss 
Bronson caught a bow for her charming school- 
ange skit, and then came Bob Nelson, With 
— Peppy songs crammed with strong catch 
‘nes he caught the andience off its guard per- 
haps, but earned an encore. There is no doubt 
his desire for speed for these songs is good 
showmanship, but he would do well, especially 
in a house as big as the Winter Garden, to 
consider pulling down to a tempo that will let 
the hearers in on every word he has to offer. 
Tle doesn’t need to depend altogether on speed 
for his comedy songs, as he proves with cer- 
tatn of his encore numbers, his personality 
being sufficient to win even the most hard 
boiled. Let's hear all the words, we say. If 
w bat we heard are samples we want the full 

wae And giving credit where credit is due 
. ‘s to mind that Herbert Hewson is a big 
aps fl yar, Nelson across artistically. 

; ay around some these corners, ‘ 
such a Pianist."* of “Ol, 

Yor closing, when he should have opened the 
last half, General Pisano and Company pre- 


Keith’s, Cincinnati 
(Reviewed Monday Matinee, March 18) 


The new program is lively. Roscoe Ails and 
Co, are featured, but do not finish far ahead 
of Burns and Freda. The Eight Blue Devils 
also come to the fore with what is perhaps the 
most sensational tumbling act seen here. Good 
attendance. 

Pathe News. Aesop’s Fables, 

Edith Jane and Harold Milles got away fairly 
well with double and solo dance numbers. Miller 
is good as a soft shoe stepper and would take 
better by smiling instead of displaying too 
many signs of forced effort. A little polish of 
routine also would help. Nine minutes, in two; 
two bows, 

Babcock and Dolly have a knockabout and 
flirtatious skit that smacks too freely of bur- 
lesque atmosphere, Their special drop and hang- 
ing are colorful and the feminine member dis- 
plays three changes of costumes, the head por- 
tions of which are as plentiful as the apparel 
above her knees. Babcock is best in an acro- 
batic dance. Fifteen minutes, in one; three 
bows. 

Eight Blue Devils. These young Arabians 
displayed remarkable routines of whirlwind acro- 
batics, after opening with pyramid formations 
in which the understander supported his seven 
co-workers, that evoked loud and continuous 
applause. Speed and individual ability char- 
acterize this turn. Five minutes, in four; three 
curtains, applause. 

Officer Vokes and Don, assisted by Miss Bobbie 
Butler. Don is a brown and white fox-terrier 
that, when sporting a dress suit, can imitate a 
“drunk”’ almost as good as a human. Twelve 
minutes, special drop in two; talk by Vokes. 

Roscoe Ails, with Kate Pullman, supported 
by a five-man jazz orchestra. Buffoonery by 
Ails and Pullman precedes and follows the 
appearance of the quintet of real syncopaters, 
a needed guantity in making the act worthy of 
headline position. Banjoist Charles Calvert 
steps out and scores heavily with a classy dis- 
play of acrobatic hoofing. Ails is some dan- 
cer himself, especially when shimmying and 
Negro shuffling is considered. Miss Pullman, 
pretty of face and with an attractive figure, 
upholds her end with ease in a dash of the 
nimble toe and shoulder-shaking stuff. Twen- 
ty-six minutes, cye. in three; eight curtains; 
return by Ails and Pullman. 

McConnell Sisters. They are two clever and 
talented girls who register pleasingly with 
semi-classic songs, presented in pretty stage 
dress. Seventeen minutes, in one and two; re- 
call, 

Harry Burns and Steve Freda have a new 
line of ‘‘wop’’ comedy and put it over in a 
manner that makes them distinctive in their 
field. A nonlisted miss of much charm was 
introduced and proved a decidedly acceptable 
Italian harpist. Burns ana Freda ended with 
a burlesque imitation of Gallagher and Shean 
that stopped the show. Twenty-two minutes, 
in one and two; solid hit, : 

Joe St. Onge and Company, two men and a 
girl, offered a neat acrobatic version in which 
the males exhibited their original ‘‘flip-flap 
toe-to-toe catch."” Six minutes, shell in three; 
applause.—JOE KOLLING. 


KID MAX AND BATTLING 
HECKEY STIR BROADWAY 


. 


Rough-and- Tumble Fight Draws 
Crowd So Large Reserves Are 
Called Out 


New York, March 11.—Max Hart, vaudeville 
agent, and Harry Saks Hecheimer engaged in 
a rough and tumble encounter at Broadway and 
Forty-sixth street yesterday, attracting so 
large a crowd that police reserves were called 


to disperse it. 


“He hit me with his silver-headed can@,” 
Hart declared in West Side Court shortly after. 

“Bunk,” expostulated Hecheimer. “He 
snatched my cane away from me and got caught 
in the recoil." 

To prove that he had been attacked Hart 
exhib'ted a still rising lump on his head, where 
he said he had been hit by the silver knob. 
He referred to it as a ‘‘deadly weapon.”’ 

It developed in court that Hecheimer was 
attorney for Mrs. Hart, who is suing her hus- 
band for divorce. Hecheimer has a $5,000 
damage suit against Hart pending in the Su- 
preme Court. The combatants were held for 
further hearing. 


MUST MAKE ROOF SAFE 


Utica, N. Y¥., March 8.—The Corn Hill, local 
picture theater, was closed Tuesday by Com- 
missioner of Public Safety Clarence Stetson 
until such time as its roof has been made safe. 


sented a marksmanship act that wins all the 
medals ever cast for this sort of thing. In the 
Proper spot he should have stopped the show. 
—JED FISKE. 


Palace, Cincinnati 
(Reviewed Monday Matinee, March 18) 


Laughs and thrills, blended with exhibitions 
of the more artistic brand of entertainment, 
are incorporated in the current bill and make 
one of the best, if not THE BEST, the re- 
viewer bas ever seen here. Pictorial program: 
Pathe News, Topics of the Day and ‘‘Love’s 
Boomerang”’. 

Palmero’s Canines, a group of fox terriers 
handled by their master in excellent fashion, 
provided a large number of thrills. Palermo, 
judging from the unerring skill in which his 
charges went thru their routine, is a dog 
trainer of more than ordinary ability. Twelve 
minutes, in three; heavy applause. 

An unusual offering is that of the Lutes 
Brothers. One, Clare, armless, displays a dex- 
terity with his toes that is truly marvelous. 
He plays a trombone, trumpet and a set of 
drums and does a little carpentering (all with 
his toes) with a finesse that emphasized his 
skill. Ten minutes, in one; two bows. 

The Blue Bird Revue is an artistic offering 
of classic, semi-classic and jazz voca] selections 
by a mixed quartet. Male and female duets, 
together with a number of solos, were equally 
appreciated. The judgment used by the artists 
in selecting their songs, and the manner in 
which these songs were delivered, bespeak good 
taste and talent. Fifteen minutes, in three; 
three curtains. 

Billy Beard, late of the Al G. Field Min- 
strels, lived up to advance notices in a manner 
that almost went the notices one better. This 
veteran of the ‘11:45 brigade’’ puts over a large 
assortment of jokes that literally took the 
house by storm. He also displayed a melo- 
dious voice. Twelve minutes, in one; encore, 
numerous bows. 

Fern and Marie, with their rediculous com- 
edy, had the audience in an uproar for fifteen 
minutes. Ray Fern delivers quite a few time- 
ly jokes aimed at persons and objects familiar 
to all. Miss Marie is a nimble dancer, and 
does considerable to “‘keep the ball rolling’. In 
one; four bows amid deafening applause. 

Lloyd and Christy are two gentlemen with a 
decidedly Southern accent who talk themselves 
into a solid hit. They have snappy material, 
almost too snappy at times, but their manner in 
getting it over eliminates all the vulgarity and 
leaves only the humor. And did the people 
like it? Why they ate it up. Fourteen min- 
utes, in one; three bows. 

The Dancing McDonalds, man and a woman of 
slight stature, executed a series of jazz and 
aesthetic dances that provided a fitting climax 
for the show. Seven minutes, in three; two 


“LITTLE BO PEEP” LOSES WEEK 


New York, March 11.—Gallagher & Bern- 
stein’s “‘Bathing Beauties” played the Lafay- 
ette Theater this week to fairly good business 
and appreciative audiences, which for the most 
part were colored folks, as this has been @ 
colored house with colored players for some 
time. Gallagher & Bernstein’s “Little Bo 
Peep,” another burlesque show, was to fol- 
low in for a week’s engagement, but 4 **eall” 
was put on the house by the New York City 
Local f. A. T. S. BE. on the grounds that the 
house was not unionized. 

It appears that while the colored stage 
crew of the Lafayette are members in good 
standing with their union, they are not afili- 
ated with New York City local 1. A. T. S. E., 
which up to this time has not admitted them 
to membership, the reason being given by 
officials of the local that they have sufficient 
members now to handle every theater in New 
York City. 

Mr. Spencer, assistant to the international 
president of the I. A. T. S. B. in recognition 
of the extent of colored theatrical interests 
thruout the country, has been working for the 
past year toward harmonizing their interest 
and that of the union. J. A. Jackson, of The 
Billboard, has been a big factor in this move- 
ment. 


“FRENCH DOLL” IS OWNED 
BY IRENE BORDONI 


New York, March 11.—Examined in sup- 
plementary proceedings in the Supreme Court 
this week Irene Bordoni, who is playing the 
principal part in ‘‘The French Doll’’ at the 
Lyceum Theater, declared that she pays all 
the living expenses of E. Ray Goetz, her hus- 
band, and that he has not earned any money 
in a year. 

Miss Bordoni was examined in connection 
with an old judgment obtained by Jack Welsh, 
a stage manager, against Raymond Hitchcock 
and Goetz. The judgment was for $1,900 and 
Hitchcock paid $1,000 of it. Welsh is trying 


to get the rest out of Goetz’s earnings from 
“The French Doll’ since all the printing at 
the Lyceum Theater announces that the play 
fg being produced by Goetz. 

Both Goetz and his wife testified that the 
play is his wife's property and not his and 


FILM EXPOSE OF SAWIN’ A 
WOMAN ENJOINED 

New York, March 11.—On application of 
Horace Goldin, magician, Supreme Court 
Justice Joseph BE. Newburger this week 
Sranted an injunction restraining a man 
named Bird from exhibiting a motion Pic- 
ture, entitled “Magic Revealed,’ which 
among other things discloses how a woman 
may be sawed in half. In his decision 
Justice Newburger said: 

“It appears that the plaintiff's right to 
the act known as ‘Vivisection, or Sawing 
a Woman in Half,’ has been susta’ned by 
the District Court of the United States 
for the Southern District of Mlinois, the 
United States District Court for the West- 
ern District of Pennsylvania, the Court of 
Common Pleas of Marion County, Ohio, 
over the defendant’s cla'm for the right 
to the production of moving pictures cover. 
ing the same subject upon the ground that 
the matter had been published in maga- 
zines and newspapers, the ownership by 
the plaintiff not being disputed. The ap 
Plication for injunction will be granted 
upon the plaintiff filing an undertaking in 
a sum to be fixed in order to secure the 
defendant.”’ 


FLORENCE REED 


In Edgar Selwyn’s Newest Comedy, 
“A Royal Rendezvous” 


CAasT: 
eeecccccccccccccccess+ MP. Lionel Glenister 
Raoal Vernet eovccccceces MF. Reginald Goode 
Countess Marie de Tourney .............. 
PPYTTTITITTTTTrire i FLORENCE REED 
The Boudoir of the Countess Marie de 
Tourney. 


Time—An evening !n May, about the year 

1750, in the Reign of Lou's, the Magnificent, 
(Roviewed at Palace Theater, N. Y.) 

Ever since the day that Eve developed a 
taste for apples a pretty face and a well- 
turned ankle have ruled man—be he king or 
knave. So it is in this piquant little period 
playlet of Edgar Selwyn’s. 

The action takes place in a boudoir—where 
else could it, We ask you, with Louis XIV, 
King of France, as one of the principal char- 
acters. Nothing really naughty transpires, 
however (which must have been disappointing 
to some in the audience)—the Countess Marie 
de Tourney is far too clever for anything like 
that. She invites Louis to her chamber and 
when once she gets him there she makes him 
look like —— like a second louie. Why does 
she trifle with the king's affections, you ask. 
Ha, Ha, Ha, you make us laugh (business of 
holding our sides), why, you big silly, she has 
a lover for whom she is ambitious. He has 
eaid something terrible about poor old Louis, 
and she seeks his pardon and a little additional 
favor—a captaincy in the King’s Guards, or 
6omething like that. Does she get it? Didn't 
we say a pretty face and a well-turned ankle 
always win. 

Taken all in all this is an uncommonly well 


written and wel) acted bit of Be 


in every respect of the talents of even 
Florence Reed. It has laughs for those whe 
like to laugh, sword play for those who like 
thrills, and romance—romance for those whe 
like to laugh and relish thrills. What could 
be a more complete bit of stage writing. The 
forepart is taken up with a prolog in which, 
let it be said with a loud and clear voice, 
there is no cheap bid for applause. Whatever 
applause this act earns it earns on its merit, 
and the merit of the actors who present it. 
Not since Ethel Barrymore made her all too 
short appearance in vaudeville last season has | 
the twoa-day offered so charming 2 divertisse-’ 
ment.—E. H. 


POOR ATTENDANCE AT 
NEW ORLEANS OPERA 


New Orleans, March 8.—Evidently relying 
on the press reports of the activity of lovers 
of grand opera in New Orleans, the K. & EB. 
Company, lessee of the Tulane Theater, booked 
the Russian Grand Opera Company for a 
week’s engagement beginning Mast Sunday! 
night. The attendance up to Thursday has 
been poor, so much so that the newspapers of 
this city have commented on the matter edi- 
torially, claiming that the activity on behalf 
of a structure to house grand opera is simoly 
a pretext for a place to display gowns and for 
social events. 


that he receives nothing for producing it. 
She asserted that she paid the rent of their 
apartment and al! their other expenses and 
that he owed her $35,000 for money which she 
had leat to him to put into enterprises whiv 
had not been successful, 


PBT PSs Oa 


a 


| =/'3 . 
ee | 
Yl BRPYPPPY////// | .§ 
oF | 
—— | 
_ | 
: = \ 
' . 
| 
bows; hearty applause.—KARL 5 be : 
ee | | 
; 
- , ¢ * 
a | | | 
a 
| 
a a —_ 
Oo Sf : 
i f , 


se Felipe om 


ana 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


“STARS OF YESTERDAY” 


DRAW RECORD ATTENDANCE 


Police Reserves Necessary To Regulate Crowds 
That Storm Broadway Box Office To 
See Olctimers 


New York, March 11.—Five oldtime head- 
liners——"‘The Stars of Yesterday’’—Corinne, 
Barney Fagan, Lizzie Wilson, Joe Sull van and 
Tony Williams, set a new pace for box-office 
attractions at B. S. Moss’ Broadway Theater 
this week, the crowds reaching such propor- 
tions on Monday night that police reserves were 
mecessary to regulate traffic in front of the 
theater. Not only did these comebacks run 
up a high score as a box-office draw, but also 
an applause record unprecedented in the annals 
of present-day vaudeville, enthusiasm on the 
opening night reaching a climax w'th calls 
for .. nether. s. <.- Gpewh »..< » 
author . . . from alj parts of the house. 


Hundreds of actors and artists, curious to 
see the possessors of names that were famous 
when Tony Pastor's was ‘‘America’s foremost,” 
along with scores of oldtmers, equally curious 
to note the effect of “‘yesterday vaudeville’ 
on a present-day audience, v-sited the house 
during the week. Those of the younger genera- 
tion went away satisfied that ‘‘those were the 
days,”” while many an oldtimer returned home 
and (it is safe to assume) began a feverish 
search for the manuscript to some long for- 
gotten monolog or song with a thought to 
reviving the old act. From all appearances and 
reports oldtimer acts are in for a vogue. 


Producers Are Youngsters 


An interesting fact in connection with the 
production of “‘Sters of Yesterday,” the cast 
of which includes some of the oldest artists 
on the stage, is that the producers, Milton 
Hockey and Howard J. Green, are the two 
youngest in the business. Edward Le Roy Rice, 
theatrical historian, and generally regarded as 
the foremost authority on minstrelsy in the 
country, is the author. In addition to “Stars 
of Yesterday’ Hockey and Green have two 
other oldtimer acts on the road—‘‘Minstrel 
Monarchs” and ‘‘The Comebacks."" The suc- 
cess of these offer'ngs as a present-day enter- 
tainment feature is attested by the fact that 
they are already booked well into 1928. 


—— 


“DEANS OF MINSTRELSY” 
OPEN ON ASSN, TIME 


One of the Most Unique Acts in Vaude- 
ville Opens on Association Time 


oe 


Chicago, March 10.—A novelty in several 
ways, the act styled the ‘Deans of Minstrelsy,"’ 
opened yesterday in the Apollo Theater, Jancs- 
ville, Wis. There are five men in the act 
whe have figured in cork and olic for a longer 
period than most of us can remember. They 
are Harry Armstrong, George Wilson, Banks 
Winter, George McKisson and Tommy Queen. 

Mr, Wilson was one of the organizers of the 
Barlow, Wilson, Primrose and West Minstrels 
in 1872, and during the fifty years that bave 
elapsed has been continuously before the pub- 
lic. Be is said to be the oldest living active 
dlackface minstrel. Mr. Winter, tenor singer 
and author of “‘White Wings,” a popular bal- 
lad of a generation ago, was years ago with 
the Jack Haverly Minstrel organization. Along 
with him at that time were also Mr. Arm- 
etrong, Mr. McKisson and Mr. Queen. The 
veterans named played together the last time 
in the old Casino in Chicago during the World's 
Fair twenty-nine years ago. 

The “Deans of Minstrelsy” act opens with 
twenty-three in the first part, five “live ones” 
and eighteen electrically operated marionettes. 
The Western Vaudeville Managers’ Association 
is arranging the booking for the remainder of 
this and all of the next season. 


Almost as interesting as the “Stars of 
Yesterday" themselves are the posters and 
bills which cccompany them as a lobby dis- 
play. One bill in particular drew considerable 
attention this week. It was of an Eighth 
avenue theater for Monday, March 6, 1882. 
The headline attraction was “The Four-in- 
Hand,” a blackface act, including Joe Sul- 
livan, Last Monday, exactly forty years later, 
day and date, Joe found h mself at the Broad- 
way Theater wth “Stars of Yesterday,”’ bead- 
ing the bill in each instance. The posters and 
bills are from the collection of Edward Le 
Roy Rice, said to be the largest and most 
complete in ex'stence. 


George Valentine Holloway, manager of the 
Broadway Theater, was enthusiastic in his 
praise of the oldtimers. 

“Considered solely from the vi of 
showmanship,"” said Mr. Holloway, “this is 
to be the outstanding achievement of the ¢ur- 
rent season.” 

On display in the Broadway iobby were tele- 
grams from McIntyre and Heath, Fox and 
Ward, George M. Coban, Sam H. Harris, Willis 
P. Sweatnam, Houdini, Kellar, Gus Gill, 
Thomas J. Ryan, Ida Siddons and R. H. Burn- 
side, John Sparks, Richard Carle, George 
Maron and William Coll-er. 


COURT ENDS INJUNCTION 
IN N, Y. MUSICIANS’ ROW 


Justice McCook Decides Against Old 
“Quorum Club” Which Ran 
Outlawed Union 


——— 

New York, Nov. 11.—Supreme Court Justice 
Philip J. McCook this week ended the long and 
bitter factional row among the organized musi- 
cians of New York when he denied « motion 
for the continuance of an injunct’on issned on 
February 6 last against the Musicians’ Mutual 
Protective Union and Joseph Weber individually 
and as president of the American Federation of 
Musicians. He also denied a petition for a 
receiver for both organizations. 


The Musicians’ Mutual Protective Union, 
which was also known as Local 310 of the 
American Federation of Musicians, was out- 
lawed by the latter orga cization on July 7 
last, following many troubles within the local. 
These differences it was alleged were caused 
largely by an inner organization known as the 
“Quorum Club,"” which was said to be a secret 
faction. Members of this body got contro) of 
the executive board of the M. M. P. U. and 
transfer cards for musicians from ont-of-town 
locals were repudiated by the M. M. P. U. 
Its suspension~ followed. 

Shortly after this a lockont or strike—it was 
called both—was declared, and this strike, 
which temporarily affected the notion pi-ture 
and vaudeville houses in this city, ended in 
faflure. 

A member of the M. M. P. U nimed Schirra 
thereupon applied for an Injunction restraining 
the M. M. P. TU. and the American Federation 
of Musicians, including its president, from 
carrying on their organizations, and also asked 
for a receivership. 

In denying a permanent injunction and the 
receivership Justice McCook said: 

“By changes in its letterhead, the issuance 


- 


a 


“The New York area was thereupon 
by the Federal Federation as te te 
local 802 was formed in place of M. M. P, U~. 
which had formerly been Local 310." ’ 

Continuing, Justice McCook said: 

“The logical circumstance now induced 
but a handful—not to exceed fifty, out _ 
membership of about eight thousand in M. M. 
P, U.—to join the new local, and to these have 
since been added four thousand ovtsiders, 

“The group which had led the fight against 
the policies of the Federation, including the 
plaintiff? and the eleven others he has repre 
sented, continued after the suspension active 
in the M. M. P. U. until January, 1922. The 
twelve in some instances declined to join Local 


802 of the Federation, and in others were re- 
fused admission to it. 


“They now find themselves ent off from the 
body of their fellows, and, as they claim, from 
lucrative employment as well. It is unneces. 
sary to inquire whether jin fact the situation 
of the few individuals who here complain js 
due to their own fault, to the fault of the de- 
fendants or to general conditions of employ- 
ment. They have in my opinion failed to show 
reasonable cause for a continuation of the re- 
striction upor the defendants created by the 
existing injunction or the even more drastic 
additional injunction relief now sought.” 


THE DUTTONS IN CANADA 


The Duttons with their society riding act 
have been pleasing Canadian audiences with 
brilliant novelty. The act is playing the Or- 
pheum time, At Calgary it was one of the 
hits of a splendid bill, and received excellent 
press notices, 


AND DON’T FORGET YOU CAN 


RENT SCEN FRY eu 


UNIVERSAL SCENIC ARTIST STUDIOS, Inc. 
190 N.StaeSt CHICAGO 
LP. LARSEN, Manager and Art Directo. 


Tel., Dearborn 1776 


LARRY (SLIM) CONLEY AND HIS ORCHESTRAS WANT 


, FOR No, 1 
FOR No. 2. 
FOR No. 3, at Mexico City, now organizing. 


able to make a showing with a fast organization, 


you can go anywhere, anytime, and must sign one-year contract. When you write enclose photo, 


» at Juarez, Mexico, Novelty Dance Drummer, double either Saxophone or Piano. Wire, 
at Phoenix, Arizona, Violin, double Banjc; Clarinet, double Oboe. Wire. 

Want Piano Leader with 

NOTE—Can always use Musicians of unusual oy 

Must 


good dance library, Write. 
I cannot use average Musicians. You must be 
young, meat appearance, unencumbered, go that 


State all. 


Make salary ritht, as you get it, We are always working. No boozers or lazy musicians tolerated, and you 


must be gentlemen. 


WANT TO HEAR FROM Boyd Senter, Buck Kerns, Olga Ramirez, Billy Lewis, Buzzy Williams, Ray 
Mayer, Dewey Davis, Oscar Marcour and others who have worked for me before. 


als SECRETARIDS, send in your dates if you want ap upusua) musical entertainment for your grand- 


and. 
MANAGERS RESORT HOTELS, let me know 
entee to fumish you a Feature Orchestra of a d 
Address all communications to 


LARRY CONLEY, care Latin-American Ciub, Juarez, 


wants for your summer season, I will positivel ar- 
erent style rH A 


from any you have had that will please you. 


exico. 


WANTED FOR BRUNK’S COMEDIANS 


Good General Business Man. One that doubles band preferred. Year’s 
work to right man. Chas. Davis, Jimmy Bartine, let me hear from you. 
HARLEY SADLER, Mgor., Waco, Texas. 


JACK HILL 


earn at least $100 a week. To start Apri) 15. 


returned), Don’t misrepresent, No money advauced. 


JACK 


WANTED—EXP. VAUDEVILLE AGENT 


Y LLSON, THE WONDER H¥ERCULES, AND MISS IVNA, INTERNATIO? y, 
ANCING AND MAGICIAN ACT. Must be active, reliable. TONAL, COSTUME 


The right man, on percentare basis, has to 
A 


We have had six consecutive months contracte 
Governor for Panama Canal Zone and the Buropean Y¥ Send ‘shote "cwit 


- M. C. A. American Shows. Send photo (will be 


Address 
HILLSON, General Delivery, Baltimore, Maryland. 


WANTED PIANO PLAYER QUICK 


Mugt be able to handle standards, also play Air Calliope, Also want good Cornet Player, Gen 
an with Specialties, Blackface Comediam for some Wee, Dpaceliies and produce Concerts, No eb Bustoese 


we know you. Pay your own wires. 


NDERSON-GUNN STOCK CO., Meridian, Miss. 


At Liberty, A-1 Comedian 


All essentials. Specialties Can produce Dramatic 
Wardrobe, experience, ability, 
LEON J. TEMPEST. care 
th and Race, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 


WANTED—Partner. to furnish small Dramatic Com- 
pany for coming season. 1 have fine small outfit, com- 
Plete. Must have real Performers and be able to 
t on a week's rep. Will split 50-50. Don’t write 
you don’t mean business. Address CHAS. MACKIE, 

care Sherman Bros., Salem, Missouri. 
Piano Player; read and fake and 


WANTE work in actS: Musical and Novelty 
Map, dicine People of 
Sobriety 


all kin Must change 
gtrone for week. essential. ‘ros CHRISTY. 
entsville, 


Ne re eS TED: 
AMATEURS—Well-known Director will accept a few 
talented amateurs for short course in dramatic direc- 
tion and place them in Zesteorens) companies for the 
gummer. Ap excellent ; ance <4 a to ot = 
ess. Write fer applica ank. - 
401, 8 &. Dearbom &t.. Chicago, 

. 

\ 


STOCK COMPANIES and VAUDEVILLE WANTED 


JACOB'S THEATER, McComb, Miss. 


Population, 10,000. 


Large Seating Capacity and Stage. 


GENERAL BUSINESS PEOPLE WANTED—General Bustiess Peop’e that can play enouch to double in 


opening overtures of popular songs, Man to pla 
Player that cam do responsible line of Aarts. 
equal cut on dances. 


State salary, height, weight, 
gummer North, 


in Wisconsin. Ope April 24 


We pley one and two dances a week. Ali 

Want young people. 
Rehearsals one week earlier, 
Manager Fiorence Burton Ce., Wild Rose, Wisconsin. 


g00d line of parts and double Comet or Sax. W. 
for good line of Parts to double Sax. of Tenor Benjo. > —— 


People who do specialties given preference. Piano 


musicians get 
This is a house rep. show. All 
Address STEVE BURTON, 


Twentieth season under canvas. 


People 
line of parts; must he capatle 


to feature. 


Character Man 


WANTES—SEmonesy STOCK COMPANY 
nh all Ines, 


with specialties preferred. 


Young Ingenue, ; 
and Woman, Juvenile 24 a strou 


Leading Man, Secon 


Business Woman or Sister Team, Agent that will put the paper ap and get results, Canvasmen and Mue 


éicians for Crchestra. 


Open in April m Maryland. 
Sterke, Fior'da. 


All particulars first letter ROBERT F. DEMOREST, 


PICKERT STOCK CO. WANTS FOR SUMMER wanreo 


Produce latest releases or popular plays, Cur own artist. © 
A D ~ 1 > meee 


GOOD STOCK 
tions. 


LOCATION, 
Wanted to bear from 


CLINT DODSON, De Land, F 


VESTOFF-SEROVA 


Ballet. 

Dretative, 

Ball Room Dancing. 

Children’s Courses & 

Specialty. Baby Work, 

CLASSES, 

PRIVATE LESSONS, 
NORMAL COURSES, 
Special Summer Nor- 

mal Courses 

4th June. 


— A ee a 2 
“ Advanc Nature Da Work, 

Sonia Serova. Price, $5.00 per .- & ed 
retative Studies, 1921,”° Sonia Serova. Price, 


by Veronine Vestoff. Price 
“Technique and Plastique, 
Toes, by Vesenine Vestoff. 


"1921," Training on 
ce. $3.50 wl- 
ume. 


ri 
VERONINE VESTOFF 


72d Street, Ew 
« ee Columbus 6212 and Sugg TORK: 
Seas 


A little, simple, scientific 
device enabling anybody. 
without previous know 
edge, to tune. The eye 
ests nm the tone is 
absolutely right if a 
is incapable. Checks 
corrects matonation, teaches 
i and their note-names 


either Violin or 
$2.00, at dealers or direct. By contract with the in- 
Yentor we have secured control over this and other 09 
less meritorious ideas in use at the late TECHNON 
SCHOOL OF MUSIC, which we propose developing 
commercially as circumstances permit. Address U3 
in all matters concerning the aforesaid School 
TECHNON MUSIC AND DEVICES. oe, 
Suite 214B, 1545 Broadway, New York City, 


NEW SCRIPTS 

Never done in Rep. before, but done hundreds 4 
times In Chautauquas and large Stock. “TCO MUC 
BUSINESS,” farce comedy, 4 and 2, one set; great 
arts for all. “CROWDED YEARS,” comedy drama, 

and 2, 2 sets: requires very clever lead'ng woman; 
great light comedy part. “SHOESTRINGS,” & mys 
tery comedy, 3 and 2, one set: easily played and 
ood parts for all. These and other bills will be re- 
Irased at 540.90 ae with protected territory, Termes 
1,00 with order, ba'amce C. O. ww r 
reading. WALES PRODUCTIONS, Hartford Bide. 

cago, 


“HORIZON” 


Arraned bh HAMRY, ALFOD= ‘Have no time t 

a 5 ave 

blish this song myself and open for moalty: offers 
‘ou can’t go wrong with this song. 


COIN BEUCK, Belden, Neb. 
THE PRINCESS STOCK CO. WANTS 


People in all lines for Rep. under can d 
contracts, q * . Musicians for B, & 0. C 
hearsals April 20. State salary, Address PB. ©- 
WARD, care Densmore Hotel, Kansas City, Mo. 


At Liberty March (8th 


Experienced Cornet. B. and O, Will troupe or lovate, 
. J, ACUFF, 2321 Clinton Ave., Ft Worth, Tex. 


Performers and Musicians who 
double, for Sherman Bros. week- 
stand tent show. We pay Also Boss CanyasmaD 


Sie ties 0 


rT rn nee 2 z | 
1 
H 28 ee | 
: . rr 2 ns eancntasesaemeees 
TT TT pep 
: of a defiant circular and other overt acts, the 
M. M. P. U. indicated acquiescence in the sus- 
: . pension and indeed appeared to regard itself 
; Be =— 
+ ee 
| _————————— 
q ae —_ 
: 
i 
$ 
BE 
i 
iu 
aio 8 
" 
f CC 
if i ee 
mi 
AA wn tee = 
: DANCING e : aan 
t e » 3 
ie Ne >. ie 
; a [he 
Ba 4 Ge S- 
- eh by? 
wens apply to Secre- % aia ‘ 
ary. 
| Write for Booklet Z. y 
The following text 
" oe 
3.00 per ¥ me. Russian Imperial Method” 
- oe SS SE ETRE AS SEES SE ST EIT RR, a eS 
y MLLE. SONIA SEROVA, 
3 a radua ian Schoc 
: ee 
‘ 
= 
/ BMADDRS 
WAAR / 
TRAN [yj 
{ PAL aweln eee 
gistance to correspondence 
ee — : 
. ’ ee 
. 
4 Ee Se ee 
pe 
iG : 
| oe ’ i dD 
ii ' 
LLL ee 
SO eC(iCsisiS [ 
ETE RE RT EE LEE RTE ON SAAT EEE SSS NESS RC SE EE NS SRE EEL — 
SS 
: | ae pe 
\ ee 
4 . 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 29 


Seat ee 


MUSIC PUBLISHERS 


NEW YORK CITY 


pees 


SUGGESTS 


“DEAK 
) 


Singers, Quartets, Chau 
qua Artists, Orchestras, 


ANY MATERIAL 
(OU MAY DESIRE 
FOR THIS PURPOSE 
WILL BE SENT 
ON REQUEST. 


oc 


UUNUUTAOUOOAAUOHOUUUOUOUOUUUOUOOOUOUOLELULUUTUGEDUGUUUUUUUUUTEOUU UTE CEU OT OU DEDUCE T EEE U ULMER 


PHONE, VAN BUREN 2996, 


A high- “powered <> book hitting 


logues, Vaudeville aes. Parodies, 


Comedy, Tabloid, ete. 


FRANK C. QUEEN, 
1601 Cone St., 


“JACK MILLS, Inc. 


162 West 45th Street, 


AND 


for Vaudeville and Concert 


i uuvuaneauvvvvveucouesscseeseetntttnnn 


SCENERY 


Our New Modern Studios Now 
Located at 
2919-23 W. Van Buren Street 


CHICAGO, ILL. ° 


FRANK G, QUEEN'S 


ENCYCLOPEDIA OF COMEDY 


SURE FIRE 


cylinder, C 2 of Mono- 


Trio, Comedy Poems, Musical and Burlesque 
“Bits,” Comedy Songs, Wit, Humor, Musical 


11.00-MONEY ORDER-+41.00 


TOLEDO, 


 snngintativunissticiinineas 


tau- 
Etc. 


iavucanvavvuevsvevscacsvuasuevscacsvevsnavscusvsncesveravneavasavueevecenesspengoeevesngussisniut 


on every 


Toasts, 


OHIO. 


THEATRICAL SHOES 


Specialists in Ballet and 
eee Send 
or Price 


CHICACO THEATRICAL SHOE CO. 


339 South Wabash Avenue, 


CHICAGO. 


REFORM WAVE HITS 
PARIS MUSIC HALLS 


The Parisian music hall wil) have to watch 
its step in the future. The abbreviated and airy 
costumes that have made the actresses of these 
resorts famous, may soon be taboo. When Pre- 
fect of Police Leullier issued h's edict a few 
weeks ago against singing suggestive choruses, 
or even those with taunts for Lloyd George and 
other international figures, the chorus girls 
began to wonder how long they would be able 
to hold down their 200 francs a month jobs 
plus a percentage on the wines sold in the cor- 
ridors during entr’actes. 

Now it has become known that M. Leullier 


is going further than it was first believed, and. 


bas sent squads of inspectors to take notes on 
“objectionable’’ scenes, costumes and feminine 
graces, intending to apply for a resumption of 
theatrica] censorship, which was abandoned 
before the war, after a more or less useless ex- 
istence. With the industrious prefect himself 
directing such censorship, Paris's historic claim 
to the title of the world’s gayest city is like- 
ly to suffer a serious blow. It is feared that 
if a rigid police censorship is imposed, Amer- 
ican and English tourists will no longer flock 
to Paris. . 


VAUDEVILLE ACTIVITY 
IN MINNEAPOLIS 


Minneapolis, Minn., March 9.—Mort Singer, 
general manager of the Orpheum and Jun‘or 
Orpheum circuits, was here this week to look 
over his two theaters, the Orpheum and the 
Hennepin. Agents of the Shuberts also were in 
the city to make arrangements for popular 
priced Shubert vaudeville at the Palace. Lee 
Shubert h'mself is soon to arrive to make ar- 
rangements for ‘‘dollar vaudeville,” to be pre- 
sented here next September under the auspices 
of the Affiliated Theaters Corporation, in which 
the Shuberts are reported to be prime movers. 
This will give Minneapolis lovers of variety 
five houses to choose from next fall, 


ORPHEUM THEATER AT 
DULUTH, MINN., CLOSES 


Duluth, Minn., March 10.—When the drop 
curtain was lowered at the close of the last 
act in the Orpheum here on Saturday night, 
the lights were turned out in the last stage 
house in the city for the season, and perhaps 
permanently, so far as the Orpheum circuit is 
concerned. 

Mort Singer and Marcus Heiman, here from 
headquarters, stated that the house had played 
to a loss during the past season. Dramatic 
stock will probably be offered during the spring 
and summer, 


MORGAN DANCERS IN NEW ACT 
— -— 

Hartford, Conn., March 9.—Marion Morgan's 
Dancers broke in their new dancing act, ‘‘Helen 
of Troy, a New Dance Dream,” at the Capitol. 
There are four big scenes, with Josephine Mc- 
Lean, Carl Heberlein, John Triesalt, Al Zaff, 
Josephine Head, Louise Riley, Phyllis Jack- 
son, Flo Martin, Esther Sommers, Ruth South- 
gate, Adele Kellyg, Elizabeth West and Mary 
Harebutle, Miss Morgan has staged, costumed 
and featured dancing numbers along novel 
and original lines. 


ACROBAT INJURED IN FALL 


New York, March 11,—Arthur Kay, a mem- 
ber of the Kay, Hamily and Kay casting act, 
was severely injured in a fifteen-foot fall to 
the stage of the Prospect Theater, this week. 
He suffered contusions of the face and scalp 
and a possible fracture of his right shoulder. 


“THIRD OF CENTURY” 
CELEBRATION ENDS APRIL 24 


New York, March 11.—The so-called ‘Third 
of a Century” celebration, which the Keith 
publ'city office has been observing since the 
advent of Shubert vaudeville, will be brought to 
a close the week of April 24, it is announced. 


STOPS PLAYING VAUDE. 


New York, March 20,—The Alhambra The- 
ater, Halsey street, Brooklyn, wil] discontinue 
its vaudeville and picture policy this week, 
except for Sunday concerts. Ward and 
Glynne, the owners, plan a season of stock 
for the house. 


EDNA WALLACE HOPPER 
AT GUYON’S PARADISE 


Chicago, March 10.—Edna Wallace Hopper is 
entertaining the crowds at Guyon’s Paradise 
th's week, and is telling about the wonders of 
the plastic surgery which blotted out thirty 
years of tiny reminders of time in her face. 


AGENTS TO DANCE 


New York, March 18.—The first annual ball 
of the Theatrical Agents and Representatives’ 
Association, recently organized, will be held 
in the Hotel Astor, Wednesday, March 22. 


an XYLOPHON ES 


Make Bid M 
a, tor Thee Users 


Seteeheniote (and this includes performers on the Marimba 
and Marimba-Xylophone) are working constantly and getting 
high salaries. WHY? Because the up-to-the-minute Dance 
Orchestra Leaders know that these instruments provide the 


=P ! 
WHAT ABOUT YOU? 


Send for Catalog “‘R’’ today and get started on the road to success. 
= 


J.C. DEAGAN Inc. — 


DEAGAN BUILDING ~ 1759 BERTEAU AVE. ~ CHICAGO. 


Improve Your Act—Add to Your 
Entertainment . . 


HONE Odidd 


SONG-O-PHONE 
BAND INSTRUMENTS : 

You can play them if you cam talk. Great for Vaude- 

ville and Burlesque performers. Sure hits, Sold by 


Musical Instrument Dealers everywhere, or sent direct 
on receipt of price. Write for FREE Catalog, showing 
styles and particulars, 


THE SONOPHONE COMPANY 
Office and Factory, 33-47 South 9th Stieet, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 


CO a 6 Be 5 a 6 Fe 6 i 6 i i a 6 9 6 9 5 ee tO 


BLUNDON HOTEL COMPANY 


CATERING TO THE PROFESSION 
YORK HOTEL HOTEL CARR 


E. Diamond St., at Ohio, Phone, Cedar 9542, 326-28 Penn Ave. Phone, Court 9096. 

Every Room with Private or Connecting Bath. | Hot and Cold Running Water in Every Room, 

Elevator Service, Electric Lights, Steam Heat. Electric Lights, Baths on Byery F.or. 

MRS. ELLA BLUNDON, Owner, - - : PITTSBURG. PA. 
C0 6 96 9 6 9 9 9 6 9 9 6 9 6s 69 gO 


SECOND - HAND TRUNKS 


nehes Long, 22 Inches Wide, 33 Inches Deep. Heavy Duck Covered 

29 ao Long, 28 Inches Wide, 26 Inches 9 Heavy Duck Covered a 
88 Inches Long, 22 Inches Wide, 26 Inches Deep. Heavy Duck Covered 

37 Inches Long, 14% Inches Wide, 36 Inches Deep. Heavy Fibre Covered Throughout Shoe Trunks, 

Good as New, with Six Trays 

Al) the above are sample Road Trunks, well constructed and im first-class condition. 


VAN BUREN TRUNK SHOP, * ver\watasn tore" CHICAGO 


Tel. Wabash 1016 


JUST OFF THE PRESS 
“Gloria of the Sunny Southern Hills” 


Appealing Fox-Trot Ballad. Written and published in answer to the call for a better type of Fine, 
clean sentiment that will appeal to all as long as the institution of the home remains the basis ‘Ofc civilizas 
tion. Appealing melody. with life ay - to make it wholesome. Write for your copy today. ye 2 oo 
25e. a copies free to those in professional work. Special prices to Wwhelsesiees and jobbe 


PRICE LIST 
Straight Cornet. *. 2 


Saxophone tose S00 
Bass Horn ,... 3.00 


H 


Suite 208 | o 308 
Mpeg ICME SCENIC ARTIST STUDIOS wamnes 
cHicaco |= hd vo CHICAGO 


1M ANSWERING AN AD GEGIN YOUR LETTER WITH “1 SAW YOUR AD IN THE (41LLBOARD.” 


en Re ee 


z _ é DEAGAN : ) 
be | | 
ie ot 
: ~ a | at | -_ 
: — Wy Ww : hp OS a | 
el? 2% Oy | 
ee a | 
ee :, oo Sect: Professionals and Amateurs! - 4 | 
. | 2 ee =} eee pe } 
—— ee ,« aed de sist os | 
AND DRAPERIES wi —= | 
a) : 2 t 
| : — eee | 

TUDIV __t a ) 

== ee 
rd 
| | 
if 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


BIG TIME ACT 


S WRIT TE 


—— 


CARL NIESSE 


VAUDEVILLE AUTHOR 


FIRST FREE BALLET CLASSES 


Cleveland, O., March 10.—The first free bal- 
let classes for Cleveland, were established at 
the Keith East 105th Theater th's week, when 
the stage was turned over to 250 children for 
their introductory lesson under the direction 
of Ivan Bankoff, of the Imperial Russian Bal- 
let School. It is planned to engage a perma- 
nent teacher and conduct classes weekly. 


ST. LOUIS HOUSE CLOSED 


St. Louis, March 11.—The Grand Opera 
House, a vaudeville theater, has been closed by 
order of Director of Public Welfare McKelvey 
until the roof can be repaired. While there 
Was no immediate danger, the director thought 
it better to have repairs made at once. 


MORRIS GEST LIFTS 
VAUDEVILLE TO $5 TOP 
(Continued from page 2) 


that vaudeville patrons demand more than they 
are getting and are willing to pay for it. 

“It is all well enough to build fine theaters 
and insist on comfort and health for player 
and patron. That 
important one. But why stop there? Tryouts 
Gon’t prove what an artist can do,” 

We could not help from imagining Balieff 
“trying out’’ in some of the halis into which 
our own hopefuls are booked. 

“I could take a ballet idea to Mr. Albee,”’ 
continued Mr. Gest, ‘‘and tell him that 1 
would put it on with say sixty-five people, 
and that it would be an artistic triumph. Do 
you think that I, despite my reputation as a 
producer, and with all my thirteen years of 
experience with Mr. Hammerstein in present- 
ing vaudeville, could get over any such vaude- 
Ville innovation without a tryout? How could 
the present powers of vaudeville know such 
an idea would pay? 

*Do you suppose I could have booked Chauve- 


Souris intact as s vaudeville unit? No I 
had to arrange for a theater myself. But for 


that I am not sorry except that I should have 
to be so alone in seeing the importance of this 
show and to understand the hunger of the 
Vaudeville theatergoer for something new— 
something different. 

“This is revolutionary I know, but art is 
revolutionary. Without some risk there can 
be no advancement. The worst of all is that 
it is only the poor man who is willing to 
risk. Art always is poor. 

“Fortunately for vauderille, which I con- 
eider is the greatest medium of entertainment, 
because it reaches so many people, a revolu- 
tion is under way right now. There will be 
plenty to say that Shubert vandeville is on‘y 
@ makeshift; that it won't last; that it can’t 
last. But it will. They will risk and because 
of the facilities they have they will win, They 
will make mistakes, but they will accomplish 
great things, for this time art is not poor, 

“They, too, will learn that they can learn 
much from Balieff, this showman who has risen 
from the revolution to lead another. Vaudeville 
liae much to learn. It has its wonderful show 
places, beautiful entrances, soft-padded lobbies 
and comfortable seats, sanitary dressing rooms 
and the same stage effects, lighting arrange- 
ments and self-satisfaction it had twenty 
years ago. 

“Let us see what vandeville over here can 
learn while Balieff is with us.’’ 

Mr. Gest might have had a whole lot more 
to say and perhaps he will for a later issue, 
but the call for the ‘‘second half’? came and 
re didn’t want to miss a minute, 

We will not go into details about the rest 
of the bill. It has to be seen. The first part 


Was described to make Mr. Gest’s challenge 
to other producers of variety entertainment 
more understandable. There was “A Night at 
Yard's, Moscow, 1840,"" representing a gather- 
ing of gypsies; ‘‘The Tartar Dance,’”® ‘‘Chas- 
toushki,’’ the ditties of Russian workpeop‘e; 


“La Grande Opera Italian,’’ which, by the way, 
deserves the attention of our vaudevillians; 
“Under the Eye of the Ancestors’? and “The 
Chorus of the Zaitzeif Brothers.” 

The program tells us that M. Balieff is pre- 
paring another program to be announced soon. 
If it’s anything like Chanve-Souris—first edi- 
tion—it’s well worth waiting for. And in clos- 
ing let us indorse Mz. Gest’s statement by say- 
ing that the price of a ticket for Chauve- 
Souris will be an investment which will pay 
big dividends to any earnest vaudeville enter- 
tainer or producer. 


DANCING 
SUCCESS OR NO PAY 
Waltz, Two-Step, Fox-Trot, One 
Step, Guaranteed To All. 
-STAGE DANCING - 
Buck, dig, Chorus, Skirt, Teachew 
Work, Etc. Taught Quickly. 
by P. J. RIDGE 
Americas Greatest Teacha 
8E6Cass Street. Chicago, i 
Stamp for reply, etc, © 


is one step and a very 


2616 EAST 10th INDIANAPOLIS 


MY INDIANA MARY 
(I MISS YOU) 
FOX-TROT 


Edward C. McCormick 
4 aod 


=< 
Write for complete protes- 
sional copy of this 
winner, 


arlon. 


Other hits from our 
anvil are 


Wonderful Fox-Trot 


“WILLIE” 


(Willie, Oh Gee | 


Say 


He Will.) 
A Hot One 


ee 


P 
fice I long to see her dear sweet smiling face, 


Little Girl When 
I’m With You” 


The Waltz De Luxe 


“Indian Mammy 


ev-’ry place, Then my In-di-an-a Ma-ry 1 miss you 


Copyright MCMXXII, by Edward C. McCormick and Thomas Carton 
Published by Macks Song Shop, Palestine, [ll 


MACK’S SONG SHOP, Palestine, Ill. 


Blues” 
A Real Blues Song 


Professionals Write. 
Copy Free for a postage 
stamp. 


THE 


i. “Yaa “ys R 
— Wl, 


“Uys 


LUCILIA PEARLS 


ek el 


YY , ope ot ee arl. e 
Le Vdd “MMU fll “lt “Yili? fk OF PEARL SMELL 
LLELLA4 Sate = 


tecelved from In- 
dia NOT an ARTIFI- 


Mlk 


and hard!y distinguish- 
able from the SPLEN- 
DOR and BEAUTY of 
GENUINE Pearls. You 
can scrub. leave them in” 


water. stand on them and they 


ee. x 


A ss. eyereer® 
Moar 


will not change. Regular price, 
$30.00 and $35.00 per string. 
SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY 
PRICE: 18-inch, graduated, with 
Bligrees 14-Kt. white gold clasp. 
$16.00, im grey velvet case. 20- 


ww) WHY YOOWY 


inch, perfectly matched and uni- 
form. with 14-Kt. white gold fil- 
igree clasp, $17.50, in grey vel- 
vet case. Money cheerfully re- 

if not satisfactory. Send 
half cash. balance C, O. D. 
upon inspection. 


Maison de Perlas 


Roem 503, 
MA 25 North Dearborn Street, 
- Chicage, til. 


Conducted Ly ALFRED NELSON 


Yj Wise YY YY 


(COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR NEW YORK OFFICES) 


Homer Drake, business manager for Fritz 
Leiber, dropped into Cumberland, Md., billed 
the ‘‘burg’’ and blew for bie next etop. He 
got some showing. 


Some business managers claim to be press 
agents and publicity, workers. They claim 
a lot, but what's to keep John B. Barnett from 
claiming ‘I'm President of the United States, 
or King of Kazookee Corners’’? 


Brother W. E. Gormor, business manager 
abead of “‘Broadway Whirl,”* arrived in Cum- 
ber'and, Md., with a ‘‘flock’’ of exceptional 
-billing. Mr. Gormor has four Broadway stars 
with the show he represents. 


John Paul Ragsdale is securing much news- 
paper space in Indianapolis for the Yankee 
Circus, which is to open in the Coliseum 
April 3, under the auspices of American Legion, 
for the benefit of ex-soldiers. 


Abraham Davis Newburger, now an advance 
agent with the Ringling Bros.’ Circus, was an 
usher at the old Masonic Temple, Louisville, 
Ky., in 1897, when the Meffert Stock Company 
Played that house, 


Press matter for Jack Johnson's Carnival 
Company that plays the Maryland Theater in 
the near future has arrived to take its place 
along with the other advertising matter in 
Maryland Theater billroom, under the 

e, 


Capt. E. Whitwell, manager of Starlight 
Park, New York City, has hit upon a novel 
publicity stunt for the opening of the park 
April 22 by having a fifteen-mile roller ska- 


ting marathon on the principal streets leading 
to the park. 


May Dowling, referred to by many theatrical 
men as “queen of press agents,’ is paving the 
way for ‘The Last Waltz." For several years 


Miss Dowling was connected with Comstock & 
Gest, but severed her connection with that firm 
to take Oscar Straus’ operatic success over the 
Shubert Circuit. 


William J. Hilliar, press agent extraordinary 
for the Rubin & Cherry Shows, forwards an 
invitation to attend the opening of the chow 
at Savannah, Ga., but failed to enclose trans- 
portation, therefore we will depend on Bill 
to tell us what really takes place. 


Amother real press and business agent is 
Mabei Rynn, ahead of a real show, “Emperor 
Jones," with Charles Gilpin. Miss Rynn 
Gropped into Cumberland, Md., and left with 
many admiring friends behind singing her 
praises, 


Frederick De Coursey, of Philadelphia, bas 
signed up as promoter with the Smith Greater 
Shows for the season of 1922, and while en 
tour hopes to run into Ed Stanley, Billy Fox, 
George Mohr, Andy Ruppel, Lee Shaffer, Louis 
Fink, J. W. Lipp, Joe Steblar and other live 
wires. 


John Dow is in Cumberland, Md., at the 
Maryland Theater, soead of Lena Daley's 
“Kandy Kids,” bvriesque, of the American 
wheel. Mr. Dow is the first burlesque advance 
agent to bili Cumberland this season. Mr. 
Dow was formerly of ‘Blackstone Magical 
Show” press staff, and a mighty rood man. 


At the new Victory Theater in Tamapa, Fla., 
we found Lawrence Sharpe, another of the “old 
echool,” circusing the town just as he always 
did with the Barnum show in past seasons. I 
might add that the above boys are yielding 
to the call of the coming tented season and 
in a short time will be back “home” with thelt 
respective organizations for another season. 


> 
The Stage >) 
sf For The Boudoir A 


STEIN'S MAKE-UP 
guest 


y 


a 30 ee a 
ij ee 
CHORUS a 
OT TTS 
= SS STS SSS —= LSS SSS SS SEE ES 
i] CSCC back in dear old In-di-an-a far a ° Li, te shack that’s “ISHKI CHOO” 
: / ome TO oe ot a Se OR, ARR Ie 
| oj ——s — | Stes sas se Oe 
= 
4g Home Sweet TOR chen Where the moon-beams kiss the fields of Po 
if) eer eae —<——_ -s« a 
if SS S= — SHES SS SS ESS SS P| 
\ ' ae os 3s? Pr 7 waa -_—— = a oe 2 spew ft Pt eee 
me new mown hay, There’s a girl who waits 8 « 88 ; ee 
i 5525: SS =: SS SS = = SS + 
i ; EEE aes e+ at —a he po ft te—g 1 —ine?? ¢ 2s —_—_—— 
4 Miata ig 
Ma ae Just a dear old 
eh 5d — at —S = Hoe to Se ee ee 
a. i ——  S -— > 1ee 4 e242. 22S eee eee a Set Se ee eee ee 
fashioned girl so kind and true, When life’s shadow’s hov-er’round me : 
/ . ee ae 
i | 
i’ TE! HE A> wee 2 et bt ee = «a7 - ev o eeaew eer eee ee ee 
- i mf >> & t S> -_ St —_—_ 
i i ee you. | 
i ee 
‘ 
. : 
: ——— | 
a el po | 
a: _ 
t 7 
/ La ee 
. ou ey 
4; )_ = 
1 —— ss 
| w= . = 
Seen LLL, . ie —_—— 
\ —>— . —= 
BS \ \ — memati 
\Y = 
: \\ Se SS 
\eiiiersererserezmerrrererres., °) 
: : \ apne ay ox ui semasanaa SST ae Sam a” 
: ——————_——_—_—__—_—_—_——— 
—_ , YY yy / l Y Ys Yj Yy Yy YY, Yj Yfyy yy Yi) = 
fi a . 
Ha 
| oe ee 
r ae a ——_———_—_————— 
: neni 
_ nn eee 
Fx Ge a | 
| Se = OM 
» Sane. © 430 BROOME ST, 
ye) . . ~) NEW YORK Y 
<a Pe ees 
LA 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


WALTZ 


BY THE OLD 
OHIO SHORE 


BANDMASTERS---ATTENTION!! 


OF THE GREATEST HIT TUNES OF THE 
DAY ARE NOW READY IN BAND FORM 


| WANT 
MY MAMMY 


FOX-TROT 


WRITE FOR THEM NOW—SEND YOUR ROUTE 


SHAPIRO, BERNSTEIN & CO., Inc., Broadway and 47th St., New York 


On the Gin Gin 
Ginny Shore 


FOX-TROT 


[Beh_LET and STAGE 


SHOES efi 
EVERYTHING! — on dited promptly. 


AISTON’S sn 1» 


14 West Washington St.. CHICAGO. 


reak Your Jump 


Acts going North, South, East or 
West. Two weeks in Cincinnati. Write, 
wire or phone. PEOPLE’S THEATRE, 
Cincinnati, O. Geo. Talbot, Mgr. 


LOBBY PHOTOS 


f you need photos when you break jump a 
Cinemnatl cae at MUR SBT STU DIOS. 5 Bil Walnut 
Street. Repros.. $15.00 per 100, 


“Just Drop a Line To Mother’’ 


Free to Professionals and Chautauqua 
Singers. 
A Waltz Ballad Supreme. 
Orchestration, 25c. 
J. N. GRISICH MUS. PUB. CO., 
Kankakee, III. 


CLOWNING For CLOWNS 


NUMBER 2 


Big budget new clown material for Clown Alley or 
your Novelty Act. Walkarounds, Big S and Si- 


lent Comedy galore. Footli~hts or White Tops, $1.00. 
Acrobatic lestr: neg and Clown Producing. Complete 
Acrobatic Cou $2.00. J. “JINGLE” HAMMOND, 


257 Norton, Pontiac, Michigan, 


OPERA LENGTH HOSE 


AND ALL OTHER SUPP 
Send 4, Free Illustrated Gann 


WAAS & 


Plain canvas, 50c; with soft 
| 5nd stamps and we gerd 


SON, 226 N. 8th St., Philsdelphia, Pa. 
leather soles, 75c. Spe ‘al 
Ss. B. CALL ‘& SONS 


WHITE CANVAS BALLET PUMPS 


PHOTOS and POSTALS 
For Display. Advertising and Selling. Write for 
our SAMPLES and PRICES. We will reply by 
return mail, Our SPECIALTY 1 we GoPxING t 4 
PHOTOS Try yEL-V 

BOOSTER, VEL- vo Fl iM SERVICE. 9 Detro:t 


VAUDEVILLE NOTES 


Janet of France sails for Paris June 15. 

M. S. Bentham, Keith agent, will sail for 
Europe in May. 

“Now You Tell One” will be the name of 
Sidney Taylor’s new sketch. 

The Oakland Sisters, after fourteen years of 
partnership, dissolved last week. 

The Orpheum Theater, Salt Lake City, and 
the Orpheum Theater, Lincoln, Neb., closed 
last week. 

Lyle and Virginia write that they are play- 
ing Western vaudeville, booked thru the Will 
Jacebs agency. 

Ethel Levey and Sam Bernard will appear 
in the London production of ‘‘The Blue Kitten” 
next season. 

Leo Carillo will close his starring tour in 
‘Lombardi, Ltd.,” this week and will return 
to vaudeville shortly. 

The Grand Theater, Galveston, Tex. (Inter- 
State Time). closed last week. The Majestic, 
Austin, closes March 18, 

R. E. Mack has opened a vandeville exchange 
in the Hannah Hotel, Cleveland, with branch 
offices in Toledo and Youngstown, 

Ben Beyer sails April 21 for London, where 
he will appear at Finsbury Park. He will re- 
turn to the States in September, 

Pat Woods is assisting Eddie Darling 
fn the booking of the Riverside Theater, New 
York, and the Orpheum Theater, Brooklyn. 

Teddie Shannon advises that he will open 
a new revue in Ottumwa, Ia., soon, with 
about fifteen people in the cast and chorus. 

Dancing Danny White will open a school of 
stage dancing in St. Louis next season, so he 
wr'tes. Mr. White is now playing the Carrel 
Time. 

Pavlowa will appear in vaudeville shortly, 
if negotiations now under way between the 
Marinelli office and Russian dancer are con- 
summated. 

The Strand Theater, Shamokin, Pa., and 
the Mozart, Jamestown, N. Y., booked by 
Wi'tliam Delaney of the Keith office, will close 
March 16. 

The Dolly Sisters last week reported to the 
police the loss of what was claimed to be 
a $15,000 pearl necklace at the Riverside The- 
ater, New York. 

Charles A. Lodger plans to revive his single 
specialty of thirty years ago, Lodger will be 
remembered by oldtimers for his famous ‘‘Becky 
Kugglewacht” song. 

Manager Robert Landry, of the Star The- 
ater, Watertown, N. Y., has received word 
that the proposed vaudeville circuit in the 
North country is a certainty. 


broke in his new single at the Star Theater, 
Chicago, several weeks ago. He will play out- 
lying Chicago houses for a few weeks and 
then go East. 

Sam Tauber resigned from his position as 
Manager of the Shubert Orescent Theater, 


Brooklyn, last week. He is succeeded by 
tichard B. Tant, former manager of the 
Colonial, Cleveland. 


George Rolland and Billy Kelly opened on 
the Poli Time at Poli’s Capitol Theater, Hart- 
ford, Conn., recently, in ‘‘The Lion Tamer,” 
a comedy sketch and worthy successor of their 
former vehicle, “Fixing the Furnace.” 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Butterfield, now aP 
pearing in ‘‘Mrs. Warren’s Profession” at the 
Punch and Judy Theater, New York, announce 
that they will appear shortly in Keith vaude- 
ville in a sketch from the pen of Fred Jackson. 

The big feature of the radio concert given 
by Louis Charninsky in Kansas City recently 
was Mary Earl’s waltz hit, “‘By the Old Ohio 
Shore.’? This has proven an especially popu- 
lar number at all radio concert parties. 

Marjorie Sipp, well-known colored prima 
dpnna, recently returned from Paris, anil 
Irving Jones, colored vaudeville comedian, will 
shortly join the cast of “Shuffle Along,’* now 
on tour preliminary to its departure for Europe. 

The grown-together twins, Rosa and Josefa 
Blasek, have been on exhibition in vaudeville 
theaters in Chicago since January 16, and if 
the present plans of their manager are carried 
out, will remain there until April 2 and then 
go to Detroit. 

Al Pinard, Jr., grandson of George R. Guy, 
writes that he is now with Brownlee’s ‘‘Hick- 
ville Follies,"? scheduled to play Western Keith 
Time. Mrs. Pinard and son will join Mr. Pinard 
in Chicago next week and will travel with him 
thru the West. 

Doe and Maude Ellet were forced to lay off 
three weeks because of the illness of their 
daughter, Villetta. The act, “Girls of the 
Altitude,"® was playing at the Palace Theater, 
Ft. Wayne, Ind., when Viletta took sick. She 
is out of the hospital now and doing nicely. 
The Ellets recently closed a twenty-seven 
weeks’ tour of the Association and Junior 
Orpheum Time, 

George Stanley, appearing with his sister 
in “Bits of Dixie,’* played Loew’s Grand The- 
ater, Atlanta, Ga., the last half of last week, 
the city where twenty years ago he made his 
debut in vaudeville at the old Crystal Theater. 
He is said to have created the stage char- 
acter of “Uncle Remus.” His sister was 
formerly a member of the well-known Dixon 


B'dg.. St. Paul, Minn, Sidney Dale, formerly of Dale and Boyle, Sisters. 
a 
MAGIC DICE T A M S 318-920 W. 46th St. (one Block West of B'way) 
OUR SPECIALTY 


S AND MAGIC DICE OF ALL 


Cotaloave with Now Prices on Request. 
ALADDIN SPECIALTY CO., 
102 N. Wells St., Dept. B., Chicago. mh. 


cAnos MAGIC P. & T. TOPS, PLAYING 
IND 


OPERA HOSE 
UNION SUITS 


y= : 


. 1. 
Sitkelne: wescce coccccccees be 
os. TIGHTS. 


No goods C. D. 
Add 15c postage to above prices. 


COSTUMERS TO THE DISCRIMINATING. 


COSTUMES MADE TO ORDER 


06 

- 1S EQUIPPED TO MAKE COSTUMES TO ORDEB 
00} ON SHORT NOTICE. MODERATE PRICES. OR‘G- 
.50| INAL DESIGNS BY OUR ARTIST, OR WILL FOL- 
50! LOW YOUR IDEAS. 


WR'TE FOR ES 
COSTUMES” AND WIGS TO HIRE. 


NEW YORK CITY 


OUR MANUFACTURING DEPARTMENT 


TIMATES AND SUGGESTIONS. 
MAKE-UP. 


> 2 2 2 2 > % + 6 Sd Fs > 54 


Photographs 


SIZE DOUBLE 
8&xl0 163. WEIGHT 


25 OF ONE SUGJECT FoR. * 4.00 
100-OF 1 TO 4 SUBJECTS — 145.00 
POST CARDS PER HUNDREO- 4.00 
juST SEND PHOTO AND MONEY-ORDER 
COULD Gf CHEAPER SUT NOT BETTER 


BRASSINGTON PHOTO SYSTEM 


IGG NORTH STATE ST. — CHICAGO. ILL 
enone stewce 


Pose 2 DS OS D 04) 


, vv 
, + & © ¢ & Seee © @ 2 > + 2 


4 ” 
Loe 2 2 SO © © 60 ¢ 6 & 6 & & OF) 


Childs Hotel and Cafe 


8 SOUTH BROAD 
Walking Distance of All Depots 


ATLANTA, GECRGIA 


We cater to all the showfolks and make you feel 
at home. Hot amd Cold Running Water, Tele- 
rhone, Steam Heat in all rooms. 


Newly Installed Free Rehearsal Hall. 
Dancing Every Tuesday and Friday for Showfolks. 
THIS HOTEL OPERATED BY SHOWMAN. 


WHISTLING 


Bird Calls, Trills, Warbling Double, 
Teeth and Finger Whistling taught 
complete for stage or public werk. 
Personal or mail instruction. Cume 
plete course by mail, a price 
for a limited time only, $1.00. 
LESLIE C. GROFF, 
2828 Madison Street, 


Dept. B. Hi 


actress. great Professic: 
only an of its kind—COVERS ALL ORANCHES, 
o% you just how how to get on on the Stage, Send po! a. 
s for Uastrated book let. ont About Vaud audevitie.’* 
Pacnere t 


and oce 1 Wri this free 5 took tod 
ADELLE Box Ss7-k LOS AN tues. CALI 


Cock. 


“| Hever Wanted Something So Good So Bad” - 


(FOX TROT—JUST RIGHT) 


“My Willie Is Such A Lovable Child” 


(ONE-STEP—HE NEARLY DRIVES ME WILD) 
Dance and Prof. Copies now ready, Music dealers write for prices. 


nd. CHRISTOPHER C. WOOD, Music Publisher, 


55 Auburn Avenue, 


do. Work year around. 
ATLANTA, GA WOODS, Nuremberg, Pennsylvania. 


AT ONCE 


AMATEUR AND STAGE BEGINNERS 


Get in touch with me immediately, 
Send 10c for particulars, 


HARVEY THOMAS STAGE SCHOOL, 
Office, 316, 59 East Van Buren Street, Chicago, til. 


Trunks, Bags, Suitcases 


DIRECT to you at wholesale nrices. Save half on 
your luggage bills. Guaranteed goods, equal to any 
and better than a whole lot. Rebuilt Wardroby 
Trunks a specialty. Send for catalogue, 


REDINGTON CO., Scranton, Pa 


OPERA HOSE--TIGHTS| 


HOSETTES—UNIONFSUITS 
UNDERGARMENTS 


AISTON’S SILK SHOP, Lid. 
14 W. Washington Street, Chicago, 


STAGE MONE SHOW PRINT CO. 


501 SOUTH DEARBORN STREET. CHICAGO, 


SINGLE LADY OR SISTER TEAM 
que must play piano. State net oe 


CROSS & BANTA 


: 


oo . — ee er —— a 
4 : _ ij 7 
: ee : 
or i 
3 
% 
eee . 
ES ES —o . . 
— = ee | 
J 
SS aE LESS TNE OA | ; 4 
a ‘ b co “| 
[ J 
F 
SS eee SS _ ; a 
eee ee : 
. aa 
a o@ 
TA NT AT TER EL GLEE TEAL, EE RT TEES es ; 
. 
aE OES STR ST TE % 
cE po ¥ ¥ 
SL. 
RS REI EEE CREEL, ALLTEL EOE 
PO SE ED eee REP OUT ee EET ee CPT 
(RA SSR UR RR A ASE CRASS 
Cotton Ceeecccvccccccccccccccccoccesce & 
GET ON THE STA BHROTIMO cccccccdeccccccccesecsccesoes ; 
WOrsted nn cccccccvcccccseccececcccvees 
SE MEE ‘naccwnccudngveccccsecnccece CM Fd 
Stage Work Cabaret 
a = — _ => f | 
yportunity. Travel, see the world as vaudeville 0) - : A ; 
~— | 
Po 
BAKER BROS? ATTRACTIONS WANT OSS a 
FOR COMING TENT SEASON -—— ; : 
Trombone for Jazz Orchestra, double Specialty 
Straight im Act; Accordion, Single Novelty Acts 
doubling Orchestra, Workmen, One-night mo- L i 
a tucks LG. Baker, 300 EEtgn, Mcacie, cr a 
on trucks, L. G. Baker, 300 Muncie, ; 


ey lit: 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


answer this appeal. 
address of the appellant this page must, 
for the nonce, play postman. 
somewhere in the great, broad West, 
in the most feminine of handwriting, 
came the following: 


BEFORE I do another thing I must 
As I have lost the 


Dear Mr. James: 

I am writing this to you because my 
Sunday school teacher, who is an in- 
dustrious reader of The Billboard, says 
you must have a kind heart. Will you 
please forgive the pencil and the pink 
paper? I have the sweetest little pet 
in the world, a dachshund, which was 
given me for a remembrance by our deli- 
catessen man when he retired from 
Dusiness. His name (I mean the dog) 
fs Acanthus and he has the shortest, 
dowedest legs of any man, woman or 
beast in our town. 

I have spent hour after hour train- 


From 


By PATTERSON JAMES 


(Copyright, 1922, by Patterson James.) 


but jack,” quoth the manufacturer of 
“Gertie’s Garter” and other bits of 
stage underwear. Not in those exact 
words, to be sure, but to the same 
general effect. There is no pose, no 
high-brow pretense, no attempt to ex- 
cuse vulgarity on the plea of Art. The 
Dame on the Dollar is Mister Woods’ 
acknowledged goddess. I like that 
kind of frankness. 

Now Mister Woods has his Toma- 
hawk of Truth all whetted up for the 
people who wich to create a board of 
censorship which shall be made up of 
actors, authors and managers. None 
of that for Mister Woods. The news- 


paper interviews are too chaste and with the ticket speculators, and Mister 


Mr. Harris, or Mr, Ames to lose by the 
censorship? I'm the one they're after, 
and if I don’t object I don't see why 
anybody else should. 

“Owen Davis, speaking for the play- 
wrights, says that it is difficult to 
censer plays in manuscript form be- 
cause they are frequently altered eo 
vastly by the time that they pass thru 
the rehearsal period and reach the etage. 

My answer to this is that if play- 

wrights took six months or a year to 

write a play, instead of a week, they 

might produce manuscripts in a guf- 

ficiently finished state to exhibit to a 

censor.” 

What with Mister Cohan after the 
managers who are hand-in-the-pocket 


colorless to do justice to his vigor of Woods coming out flatfooted for the 


ing him to do little household tricks 
until he has become, my daddy says, 
an invaluable addition to the family 
menage. He has, like all artists, de- 
veloped a special line of endeavor, and 
I may say without conceit that he is 
pre-eminent in his specialty, the re- 
trieving of collar buttons which have 
dropped from the shirtband and rolled 
wnder the bureau. No matter how 
close the bureau may be to the floor 
Acanthus can crawl under it. In fact 
the lower the natural obstacles the 
More successful he has been in under- 
mining them. At first I thought it 
was his high'y-developed sense of sight 
which gave him such extraordinary 
powers of orientation. (You know the 
law of compensation might work in a 
dog the same as a man and his short- 
age of legs might have been made up 
to him by Mother Nature in greater 
acuteness of vision.) I proved that by 
Dlindfolding him and sending him in 
after a celluloid button. He brought 
it out in the elapsed time of thirty- 
mine and seven-eighths seconds, which 
is, I think, the record. In this test 
he did not have the natural advantage 
of hunting for a bone button. Now JI 
am going away to become a classical 
dancer and 1 cannot carry Acanthus 
with me. Do you know of anyone who 
would give bim a home and treat him 
with the kindness to which he is ac- 
customed? Sincerely, 

OLIVE GROVES (Age 25). 


PERSONALLY, I would like to 
Measure up to Miss Groves’ Sunday 
school teacher's estimate of my good- 
ness of heart. I would even like to re- 
ceive Acanthus into my own humble 
domicile, but my youngest child, 
Prometheus, follows the same line-of 
business and I am afraid it would cre- 
ate discord in the family group and 
competition of labor. The best I can 
do is give the appeal whatever public- 
ity may arise from its appearance on 
this page and trust to the innate kind- 
ness of the player’s heart to find some- 
one who will assume the burden in- 
cumbent upon us all to help one 
another. The only precaution Miss 
Groves should take, however, is to see 
that Acanthus does not fall into the 
hands of some vaudeville actor on the 
small time who will feature him in an 
act. If he does I fear that the number 
of shows required of all animals, hu- 
man and otherwise, in such vaudeville 
houses will be so great that Acanthus 
will gradually wear down his legs to 
nothing and that some Christmas Day, 
at the eighteenth show, he will col- 
lapse under a continuous chiffonier and 
never see the footlights again. 


WHILE I have no admiration for 
Mister Al Woods as a producer of a 
sertain type of play, I do revere hig 
brutal truthfulness, On more than 
one occasion Mister Woods has de- 
clared himself. “I give the public what 
it pays me to give. It ain’t Art I'm 
after. It ain’t Beauty. i ain't nothin’ 


PATTERSON JAMES 


Patterson James, at the age of mineteen, about to go fo , 
Academy of Arts amd Sciences. Snose’ knee ‘Pe Perfect Digestion 
sor Beta~Gamma, of the University of Walrus. The j ~ 
oll ng Jug contains 


(Pat, applied for.) 


The gentleman upon whose knee he 


Tripos of the 
is resting is his tutor, Profes- 
embrocation for debilitated 


is in his mind. 
State censor. 


thought, but they faintly suggest what censor, it looks 
Mister Woods wants a gpri 


“With a Government censor the mana- 
ger will know just where he stands,” 
he deciared. 

“The censor will read a manuscript 
and declare definitely whether or not 
it can be produced—and in this way the 
producer will be saved the expense of 
production if bis play is immoral. The 
Present plan, which calls for a public 
Jury of twelve to pass upon the morality 
of a given play, ie ridiculous. 

“Why do the managers and the 
suthors want an unofficial censorship? 
All because each of them thinks that it 
is the other fellow who is obscene; when 
he himself produces or writes a play 
it is all right. The managers and an- 
thors, however, want a pliable group of 
censors, who would be flattered to death 
fm the first place by being chosen, or 
else talked to death by managers who 
Wanted to put over a bedroom ecene 
that would reform the world. 

“If all the members of the Producing 
Managers’ Association are 80 intent 
upon clean plays as they pretend to be, 
then why should they object to a regular 
censorship? What has Mr. Hopkins, or 


like a blithesome 
ng for the Producing Managers’ 
Association. While we are waiting 
for the next number the ancient song, 
“There is sufficient power in the police 
arm to prevent immoral exhibitions 
on the stage without any further cene- 
sorship,” will be sung. Sure, there ig 
plenty of power in the police arm! But 
who ts going to get it used? Police 
censorship is the original cause for 
that delightful apothegm, “If we had 
some ham we'd have some ham and 
egés9 if the hens lay any!” 


THE demands of fair play make 
necessary the publication of the fol- 
lowing: 

Dear Mr. James: 
My shoulders are not very 


broad, 
Position in the theatrik al field : 4 
@ecure, a8 yet I am Unable to assume 
@ dictatorial attitude, therefore mis- 
Teptesentation to even a few might be 
injurious. Fortunately or unfortunate- 


ly, without my consent 
Was attached, 

Some years ago, Mr. James, I was 
brougat face to face, thro the display 


the prefixion 


ee 
_—— 


columns of The Billboard, with a most 
startling announcement of my own in- 
significance from the pen of Mr. Bill 
H. Nye, of 594 E. Rich street, Colum- 
bus, O., when he said: “I have nO con- 
nection with any one in show business 
using my name, “Bill.” Mr. James, 
I beg you allow me to return the 
courtesy. ‘‘I (‘Bill’ Hubbard Nye) have 
no connection with Mr. B. H. Nye of 
504 E. Rich street, Columbus, >, 
either thru blood or ideas.” Truly 
yours, HUBBARD NYE. 


WHY do the managers of New York 
theaters insist on lighting the audi- 
torilum of the playhouses so poorly 
that they resemble morgues? The an- 
swer is simple enough: “Electricity 
costs money!” But what about the 
comfort, the convenience andthe 
pleasure of patrons? Theater attend- 
ance has long ago been robbed of even 
the externals of enjoyment. There is no 
longer any attempt made at music, The 
only showhouses where one ever hears 
an overture tolerably played now are 
the picture palaces. Even there the en- 
trance of the leader is made the oc. 
casion for the nauseous pretension in 
which the film business is submerged. 
The orchestras in the dramatic thea- 
ters are an insult to the intelligence 
and an abomination to the eardrum. 
They are, in most instances, a com- 
bination of peanut roaster whistle, pigs 
squealing under a gate and a free-for- 
all fight in a rathskeller. Thus one ele- 
ment of diversion is removed from the 
amusement arena. Having no music 
(or worse than none) to soothe the 
ear, it might be imagined that one 
might, before the show begins, read a 
paper, or a book, or enjoy the mad 
program merriment of Beau Nash gur- 
gling on what the men are wearing. 
No! There must be no pleasure in the 
place before, after or during any per- 
formance. An audience must not have 
light enough to read, because after a 
few weeks the public mind might be 
so improved thereby that it would re- 
fuse to tolerate the things it now en- 
dures in sullen silence. 

Nor is it possible to scan the program 
to discover. the names of the cast. Of 
course, it can be done by leaning for- 
ward until the neck is twisted at an 
angle of ninety degrees and the back of 
the head is in the lap of the unfortu- 
nate occupying the seat ahead. But 
not otherwise. If there was a little 
illumination it might also be possible 
to see who was in the theater. One 
might even recognize an acquaintance, 
or bow to a friend, or do something to 
take away the clammy curse of the 
gloom-creating atmosphere. Not a bit 
of it! You must wait until the curtain 
goes up with your hands folded in your 
lap, your gaze fastened upon the cupids 
galloping on the ceiling, and with 
temptations to swift and terrible mur- 
der boiling in your soul. It is as plain 
as the nose on most managerial faces 
that it is impossible to play comedy 
in low lights. There is no reaction on 
the gaiety ganglia from a darkened 
stage. Wouldn't you think then that 
managers would say to themselves: 
‘T'll try to put the audience in the 
right mood to enjoy the show. I'll turn 
on all the lights in the house. I'll make 
them feel cheerful when they first 
come in anyway. The show will take 
the shine off soon! enough. Besides 
it’s good business. There is an intimate 
connection between lights and amuse- 
ment. Any street corner faker knows 
that he can have the best attraction in 
the world for stock, but it is no good 
after dark without a gasoline lamp to 
attract the buyers.” But they don't— 
and won't. 

What folly to write about conditions 
in the theater. The men who now con- 
trol it are after one thing only, to get 
as much of the public’s money as they 
ean for as little as they can. They 


have taken most of the joy out of a fine 


and help‘ul institution by filth, bad 
faith, extortionate prices, contempt for 
the rights of patrons, and total neglect 
of the rudimentary elements of show- 
manship. They have attracted the eye 
of the law by overcrowding, violation 
of fire regulations, and disregard of 


(Continued on page 33) 


| | a&@ 
! Pe 
Be WU WOVHH009) YY) yy yyy 
‘ partes ly 4 Y 4 UY fy Y, ’ YYyyyy yy Y Ly Yy 
: ; y G ay Z wry YU y . Yj yy Yy YY) y Yj 
i keh, zeae) 6=DEVG: ID) 
Hi 4 ye 4 ' Yy 4) Yj Y Ly j Yy j G A 
5-4 g 4 j 3 yy Yj Y Uy i y Y Yy j Y 4 
| YWWUMMVWWW(@J|J V0] Y G / Y Up Wy 
ee 
Sonne 
? 
dg 
ir 
ipl: 
Dil 
' 
1 
hy 
i 
tf 
i SS 
rh ee 
+e 
i — = — 
Ls ; ; yo 
ii - |} | ae 
mi ihe Be ses 4 os 
ip ; 2a = © ' ‘ - 
Bs 2 4 ® ea F ’ 2 | 
; : ie \ Ie Beige \g 4 r 
. ty PR as y “ as, | 
’ } i ¢ ee " ~ ‘ 4 : & 
as | ae % + . me. | 
: « hs % s tagger g , 
ee ae - a r ite | 
4 - tig ann wai a* % ~ 
q 4 ne an, a 
| : : AE OE | og 
1 ; , : ~ . Po é } r | 
& ins: re 5 > * . if 4 sg a enctns een 
f % om ae i Y ot 33 - "@ 
i io eo. | ee ‘ wes é 
it : NaS " 3 : ‘ ~ en | 
Bi ‘ ect .% Me ; dl 
# a : his ’ , a poof e 
| i ace a Ri. ‘i @ 
: Me, a : Be a ‘ 
— ; eat eae 
a on ie a N ao a ; ones, P ds a 
= | Sie ae 
' on : “oe " . ee ie . 
; ee a, aang : mab ‘ x 2 aad 
: 7 e cae i) a 
ii. nr eee 
{ 4 : en a ey 7 2s anal oi ’ i. ees = 
‘ Beh he: Bin, Ne % ph 7%, 43 ° ae . * sae: 
Poe Ge taay < $, “a 4“ gt, = , a ' 
' ee “gs eee Se idk Nes hy t BS os . —¥ 
Ds i, itl ake a og ee aie a: i bes 
, 2@ oe vars Ee ade es i: y go te = * 
— . piece rl ee ee eee 
oy inne 
& Be Hi 
ie ; 
bay 
i 
| 
| 
| oy ae 
ee 
‘ 
‘ 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


33 


—_——a 


NEW PLAYS 


THIRTY-NINTH STREET THEA- 
TER, NEW YORK 
Beginning Monday Evening, March 6, 
1922 


ARTHUR G. DELAMATER Offers 


“BROKEN BRANCHES” 


A Play in Three Acts and Four Scenes 
by Emil Nyitray and Herbert Hall 


Winslow. Staged by Henry 
B. Stillman. 
Arthur Weldon ccoscccccecccecce WAUACe Ford 
Mary «eeeee ccccccgccecovocccccees AMY Ongley 


Larry MartenS eecceeescsesssRaymond Hackett 
Emilie Martens eocccccccccces eatrice Allen 
Elsie McCann ecevesoeccccccncscss OGD Poe 
John McCann ceccccccccccccceesH. R. Irving 
Karl MartenS ccccocscccoccceees+sHyman Adler 
Mr. McCann .ccoccccccccecceeede M. Kerrigan 
Mr, FOX ceccccccccceceseeesshussell Johnstone 


Between the acts of “Broken 
Pranches” I read the headlines of the 
evening paper. They seemed so ap- 
propriate! 

A Challenge to De Valera. 

Do You Know Any Really Happy 
Men? 

Scoffs at Capital Punishment. 

An Alternative to Strikes, 

Rum in the Upper Classes. 
Punishment to Fit the Crime, 
Liquor Kills Another. 

How to Keep Well. 


Then some girls in dinner frocks 
came up the aisle collecting money for 
wish War Sufferers and I wondered 
wiy no one has taken up a collection 
fdr American Play Sufferers. 


Of all the farrago I ever saw served 
“Broken Branches” is the weirdest. It 
is so old in theme that it has senile 
dementia. The dialog is preposterously 
jejune. And the acting!! There is only 
one man who should play the star part 
in “Broken Branches.” And that man’s 
name is—Looie Mann! What Mr. 
Mann would do the role of the dia- 
mond merchant, who gives everything 
in the woild to his children, only to 
have them turn out loafers and gon- 


ifst!!! I can see him now making 
speeches to his son. I can hear him 
delivering lectures to his daughter 


when she wants to go out to a dance 
given by a grass widow. I can visual- 
ize him in his emotions eating the 
scenery, devouring the carpets and 
draperies, and chewing the legs off the 
solid oak tables and chairs. Mr. Mann, 
and Mr. Mann alone, can do “Broken 
Branches” as it should be done. (This 
is no knock!) 


The play bears every mark of having 
come to Broadway via the Jewish 
stage. Filial ingratitude and paternal 
sorrow are the favorite ingredients of 
the downtown playwrights. Martens, 
the diamond merchant, is a nondescript 
nationally, but as the character is 
played by Hyman Adler it is not diti- 
cult to see what the authors intended 
him to be. It would have been better 
if Mr. Adler made him up with crepe 
hair and a dialect. He would then 
have been at least recognizable. Mr. 
Adler is hopelessly monotonous and 
unskilled, altho his assurance is per- 
fect. J. M. Kerrigan, as McCann, the 
old Irishman who is taken into the 
good, kind diamond merchant's home 
after his own children have parked him 
in a Jersey poorhouse, is the only 
member of the cast (with the exception 
of Amy Ongley, a player of experience 
and ability) who has any valid reason 
for being on the stage, Mr. Kerrigan’s 
crisp comedy sheds the only beam of 
light in the tomblike darkness of the 
play. Raymond Hackett gives evidence 
of possessing some latent talent, but 
the rest of the company deserves to be 
in just that kind of a play. The 
authorship reminds me of the tree 
doctor who perched himself on the end 
of a limb and then sawed it off.—PAT- 
TERSON JAMES. 


Took thru the Letter List in this issue. 


LIBERTY THEATER, NEW YORK» 
Beginning February 20, 1922 


“TO THE LADIES!” 


A Comedy in Three Acts by George S. 
Kaufman and Marc Connelly, the 
Authors of “Dulcy.” Staged 
by Howard Lindsay. 
Direction of A, L. Erlanger and George 
Cc. Tyler. 

THE PLAYERS 


MP NS ok bkawcceacanse’ iced Helen Hayes 
Leonard Beebe ...... Ce cccccccecers Otto Kruger 
SU TEE ick eh cvccciccccecs George Howell 
Be) SME 5 ccddarcsesccoocteses Isabel Irving 
CE SINT 6 cdceckenccevectes Perey Helton 
EE. wa o7 hha ts culcagaoces Robert Fiske 
2. kv tawebecccuudes J. J. Hyland 
REGS THRCRMOE 2. ce cicccccecs: Albert Cowles 
The Tenstmaster ..ccovccccce William Seymour 
"Se NEN, bs ce andeebaceee Wm. F. Canfield 
oe a eee Alfred Falk 
The Stenographer ............- Norma Mitchel 
ee RS cokanntndnecendabcne John Kennedy 
ee ES. SG cedanesécauccens “Garribaldi”’ 


Guests at the Banquet. 


A tiresome, machine-made effort at 
comedy is this second product of the 
authors of “Dulcy.” Like that vastly 
overestimated contribution to the en- 
tertainment of the subscribers of a 
New York newspaper, its appeal will 
be to just the types Messrs. Kaufman 
and Connelly attempt to lampoon in 
their play. It is a very weak blend of 
“The First Year,” “Six-Cylinder Love” 
and about six million man-and-woman 
vaudeville acts. There is scarcely one 
genuinely spontaneous laugh from cure 
tain to curtain. There are plenty of 
moments, however, built on the “You 
say this—then I'll say that—and she'll 
tell the answer” school of drama mak- 
ing. The situations have been cut out 
with a scissors from some book of play 
patterns and the characters built from 
specimens of humor rejected by the 
funny magazines. Stranjre to say, the 
women characters are the only ones 
who display any signs of humanity. I 
wonder what kind of a complex that 
indicates. Whether the authors in- 
tended it or not, their play is a savage, 
unconscious satire on Boss Worship. 
The desire of the commuting clerk to 
get promoted via the annual banquet 
given by the company to the help is 
the motive of the piece. How he gets 
invited, how he prepares his speech, 
what he does not say when called 
upon, and what happens when he gets 
his promotion make “To the Ladies.” 
The log-rolling done by the reviewers 
on the daily press lead one to imagine 
the banquet scene was simply “devas- 
tating” in its fun. It might have been 
if staged by a good burlesque show di- 
rector, but now it is only fatuous, The 
last act (which contains a trick filing 
cabinet whose drawers slide out and 
hit the boss in the back) is the best of 
the lot. 

I liked Helen Hayes as the sweet 
Dixie bride. She did not goo-goo too 
much, her Southern accent sounded 
Mobile, her makeup was a great im- 
provement over her previous effort in 
that line, and she played all the time 
with sincerity and effectiveness. There 
was a pleasant absence of audience- 
eyeing and “putting on airs” which 
have seriously imnaired her work late- 
ly. My congratulations upon her re- 
turn to normalcy. Otto Kruger gave a 
commonplace, colorless and valueless 
characterization to Leonard Beebe. A 
hundred unheard of actors could have 
done a better job. Mr. Kruger is one 
of the few players for whose acting 
ability I have a respect and who has 
the histrionic gift, but he pained me 
this time out. Percy Helton gave a 
sprightly impersonation of a youth who 
pines to enter vaudeville, a part that is 
inaccurately drawn. Vaudeville as- 
virants talk like Chester Mullin onlv 
in magazine stories. The authors 
should know that. Their work in- 


dicates more than a passing familiarity 
with the varieties and its methods. 
Isabel Irving was a natural matron. 
The two truckmen warmed my heart. 


I must be a low person or such common 
types would not appeal to me as they 
do—on and off. Norma Mitchell was 
a humorously acidulous typist, and 
Robert Fiske acted like a plain male 
biped. Speaking of the ladies, the 
show held my attention so that while 
it was going on I discovered that the 
corset ad in the program has been 
changed from a medium-stout to a 
Jong-and-lean. That's good.—PAT- 
TERSON JAMES. 


THE PLAYHOUSE, NEW YORK 
Beginning Monday Evening, March 6, 


1922 
WILLIAM A. BRADY Presents 
“UP THE LADDER” 
By Owen Davis 
CAST 
ND DONE « dicsiniaecccnsckos George Farren 
<n ht a ee Nannette Comstock 
Jane, their daughter ............ Doris Kenyon 
SANS’ casadindsktesncdnessesess ie Ai. aimee 
FO Scccea cccccccccccccccccceAlbert Hackett 
WOO ME ein poetedicakvenatndses Paul Kelly 
Joe Henley ...... pastedeces Edward Donnelly 
Moselind -TeMMy cco cecssecacies. Mary Brandon 
DRC WMG v6 ects eeccs Robert Midd!emass 
Eva Wilmers ..... be ccccecececces Adele Klaer 
SUE cdmnenietiabediawosd Clande Cooper 
ene. TE ctvecccedasddosedaes Mary Jeffery 
Stanley Grane  cccdcsscceccsesd George LeGuere 
DE cacvactddntdadeckeesunees ned Grace Heyer 
wes MAGNE oo. cd ctecwacsx Frederick Brennan 


The devotion of the Smith family to 
each other is apparent enough in “Up 
the Ladder” before that play gets un- 
derfoot very long. They are normal 
people, the Smiths, with just the 
amount of domestic friction to make 
their home lifelike. But when little 
Bobbie gets the croup you realize the 
strength of the bond of love that binds 
Smith to Smith. They rush for the 
doctor, who comes looking like a Ger- 
man barber. They cry. They sob. 
They moan. And when little Bobbie 
gets over his choking fit and the doc» 
tor announces that he will live, the 
plain Smiths fall into each other’s 
arms, Jane Smith sinks into her beau’'s 
embrace, which she has been fighting 
off all evening, ‘and the audience dries 
its tears. Wonderful institution, the 
croup! One bark of it makes the whole 
world kin. What can you expect of a 
play that starts with “congestion of the 
larynx or trachea” (Webster’s Collegi- 
ate Dictionary) and winds up with a 
hearty, homelike disquisition on the 
merits and demerits of castor oil? 
Chuck in.an ambitious young bonds- 
man (salesman), with a lovely young 
wife and an insatiable ambition to suc- 
ceed; a broker with.a bad name and a 
mean wife; still another financier with 
an awful hankering after the lovely 
young wife of the ambitious bond 
salesman, and a flapper daughter who 
loves her “licker,” her cigaret and her 
jazz; the brother of the lovely young 
wife of the ambitious young bond 
salesman; and a gang of cut-throat 
brick makers (who have escaped the 
Lockwood committee only because they 
live in Jersey) and you have a faint 
idea of “Up the Ladder.” I imagine the 
m-ation of the brick makers had some- 
thing to do with the title of the piece. 
You know! Fill up the hod, lift it to 
the shoulder, and then hup—hup—hup, 
rung by rung, to the seventeenth story? 
Hod Carriers and Common Laborers’ 
International Union, D. Allesandro, 
president? “Up the Ladder.” Com- 
prenez? 

There is also a punchbowl, out of 
which the flapper daughter of the fi- 
nancier who has the awful hankering 
after the lovely young wife of the am- 
bitious young bond salesman and the 
sister of the lovely young wife (oh, you 
do it awhile. I'm tired!) get the love- 
liest bun you ever saw outside of a 
dansant patronized by debutantes. I 
will not tell you the story! Suffice it to 
say that it has everything in it but the 
kitchen still. There are some “Curse 
you, Jim Dalton!” speeches, a short 
sermon on the Typical American, with 
a slam at the foreign element (Yah! 
who fought the war!), and one of the 
best comedy characterizations of the 
season by Albert Hackett. Doris Ken- 


yon is lovely to look at, and she is 
“devastatingly” unaffected for such a 
pretty girl, but she does not know how 
to read lines. She ought to take voice 
culture (no, I am not “capping for 
W—sor P. Ramsdell), and be under the 
control of a, blindfolded director who 
knows his business. Paul Kelly is a 
manly and husky lad who looks as if 
he might own a staggering sock. 
(Aside: “That’s the reason he gets a 
good notice, I suppose.”) He ought to 
get over the habit of dropping his head 
and looking out of the corner of his 
eye. It looks too much like getting 
ready to carry the ball. Some stupid 
director must have told him that was a 
sign of boyishness. Not in my family, 
where “Hold your head up” is the 
record that never comes off the ma- 
chine. George Le Guere did a smal] bit 
convincingly, and George Farren played 
well the father who was A-plus in his 
knowledge of castor oil. Mary Bran- 
don had an enormously “fat” part as. 
the flapper daughter, and she greased 
things up beautifully. But the most 
consummate comedy playing of the 
evening is done by young Mr. Hackett 
as the lone wolf of the Smith family. 
The last time I saw Mr. Hackett he 
was in a piece called “A Man in the 
Making.” I thought he was the worst 
actor I had EVER seen. I still think 
he was in that play. But in “Up the 
Ladder” he is priceless. Not even from 
Frank Craven have I seen such beauti- 
fully sincere comedy acting. It is posi- 
tively painful to see his Jerry Smith 
worry; it is atreat to listen to his jeer- 
ing comments on his sweetheart’s beau, 
and his expressions of surprise, con- 
sternation, panic and relief are set 
forth not only in a face of uncommon 
comedy possibilities, but also by legs 
and feet that speak. Just as rotten as 
Mr. Hackett was in “A Man in the 
Making” just so good—and better—is 
he in “Up the Ladder.” He may be 
terrible in the next role, but as Jerry 
Smith, whose life ambition is to be a 
shortstop, he is great. I could say 
no more of Booth. “Up the Ladder” is 
a common play for ordinary people. 
The more ordinary the people the bet- 
ter they will like it, but it has a mine 
of natural comedy. After all, it is 
better to laugh than cry!—PATTER- 
SON JAMES. 


OFF THE RECORD 
(Continued from page 32) 


building ordinances; they have roused 
the anger of the gullible by collusion 
with speculators, misleading advertise- 
ments and cheapened companies; are 
inviting censorship of the drama by 
the production of obscenity and pornog- 
raphy; they have turned the theater 
into a place of punishment and an 
abode of torment by the parsimonious 
conduct of the houses. But, when they 
are hit in the pocketbook, they run to 
the public they have cheated, sneered 
at and abused, and expect the sympa-~ 
thy they themselves have alienated. 
It’s a grand life! 


FRANK BACON WILL ACT 
“LIGHTNIN’” IN LONDON 


Chicago, March 11.—Frank Bacon is to play 
‘Lightnin’ ’’ in London, according to an an- 
nouncement by Edward G. Cooke, manager for 
John Golden, owner of the above production. 
It js understood that Mr. Bacon will keep on at 
the Blackstone unti! next Christmas, after which 
he will play San Francisco and maybe one 
or two other Coast cities. Then he will play 
Boston and Philadelphia and quit the States. 
It is said that British theatrical men predict 
Mr. Bacon will remain in England five years 
when he gets there. 


“EXQUISITE HOUR” SHOWN 


New York, March 11.—Grace George pre- 
sented her new play, ‘“The Exquisite Hour,’’ by 
Margaret Wright, at the Globe Theater, At- 
lantie City, Thursday night. 

Miss George, who plays the leading role, is 
supported by Norman Trevor, who recently closed 
a starring engagement to appear under the dl- 
rection of William A, Brady. 


Look at the Hotel Directory in this issue. Just 
the kind of a hotel you want may be listed. 


w 
Se a 
— i 


as, 


~ 


we tt 


The Bi 


llboard 


Play Piracy Laws 


The Producing Managers’ Association is evi- 
dently determined to put down play piracy, as 
evidenced when its representative secured the 
arrest of Thomas Casey, who owns a stock com- 
pany in New Castle, Pa. Charges against Casey 
are that unlawfully, and for profit, he used the 
theatrical product ‘Lightnin’ ’’ and “Way 
Down Fast.’’ Casey was arrested by Nicholas 
L. Bogan, depu‘y United States marshal, and 
was released on $1,000 bail. Other arrests, it 
fs believed, will follow. Equity, of course, has 
no sympathy with managers who do not pay 
foyalties, and it is our duty to warn our mem- 
bers that if they appear in such plays they 
tender themselves liable to arrest and impris- 
onment. 


We have received a letter from the Century 
Play Company which states that the Producing 
Managers’ Association has proof that one or 
two of the actors spoke publicly from the stage 
announcing performances of “Lightnin’,” and 
even went so far as to tell their andience that 
they, as members of the Lambs’ Club in New 
York and thru their own friendship with Frank 
Bacon, had secured his play. If this was said, 
{it was a falsehood. Equity realizes how diffi- 
eult it is for actors to know whether or not 
royalty has been paid upon the particular play 
fn which they have to appear. It would cer- 
tainly not endear them to the manager if they 
were to fhsist upon seeing the check or the 
receipt. We feel that the manager is far more 
reprehensible than the actors, but the law is 
the law and it holds them all equally Mable. 


Answering Dr. Holmes 


The Rev. John Haynes Holmes, in a recent 
statement, announces that out of thirty-nine 
first-class theaters in New York City he has 
discovered that nine of them house plays that 
should be banished ‘‘utterly from the stage."’ 
Dr. Holmes is against censorship, but yet he 
feels that the present situation is scandalous. 
As far as the Actors’ Equity Association is 
concerned, we want to assure Dr. Holmes that 
We are working hand in glove with the other 
interests to devise some plan which will make 
the appearance of plays against which there is 
public outery an impossibility. 


Modest Members 


Our members sometimes complain that they 
feceive no answers to their letters addressed 
te us. We, on our side, deny the charge, ex- 
cept where it is the members’ own fault thru 
failure to give sufficient route or other informa- 
tion. As an example of carelessness we can 
State that within the last few days we have 
received two letters unsigned, one of which 
Tequests us to make certain changes in the rec- 
ords, while the other was on a very important 
subject which called for an instant reply. It 
was from a lady, as we learned afterwards, who 
was traveling on the road, and she was highly 


SIGN WRITERS 


Our New one 

F E fF FOR Bates 

cop 

Over 100 tiostrations of 

Brushes and Supplies, Ad- 

dress Desk B-22. 

DICK BLICK CO. 
Galesburg, Ilinols, 
NACE’S 

WHITE LILY 

PER~ XIDE 

VANISHING CREAM 

The “Quality” Toilet Cream. 

Send 35¢ for 2-Ounce 


ons 


Jar. 
Agents make big money. 
arate bw jj & NACE’S SONS 
Ss 3 206 N. 28 rn  Philadetnhia. 


DROP and SLIDE 


CURTAINS 


All wanted fabrics. Up-to-date designs, High- 
@rade workmanship. Reasonable prices. Write. 


HALLER & HALLER 
Columbus, Ohlo 


PAUL N. TURN Counsel. 


“JOHN EMERSON, President. ETHEL BARRYMORE, VicePresident. FRANK BACON, 2nd\ 
FRANK GILLMORE. Executive Sec-Treas. GRANT ~~ 


115 WA7th St. NEW YORK. Tel. BRYANT 2141-2 


indignant because no notice had been taken of 
her communication. 


The Sugared Tabloid 
The advertisement of a certain tabloid reads: 


“Twenty cuties jn their undies.”” Very 
delicate and modest! 


Padding the Record 
Writing of tabloids reminds wus that the 
circuits which book these companies have no 
mora] right to keep more of them on their 
books than they have theaters. One circuit 
we know of is playing about three weeks out 
of five. 


The Syndicate Shadow 


On the face of it the working agreement 
announced as having been entered into between 
Messrs. Shubert and Erlanger looks like a 
return to the old syndicate days. However, 
the actor can thank God that he has an or- 
ganization now which can resent and arrest 
any arbitrary methods inmical to him or his 
work. 


Conclusions on Deductions 


In making out their income tax returns act- 
ors should be careful to specify every particular 
claim for deduction. If there is no room for 
this on the blank a slip should be made and 
pasted on to it. In talking with an expert in 
the Income Tax Bureau we were informed 


CHICAGO OFFICE ~ 1032-33 MASONIC TEMPLE BLOG 


that it is unwise to enter theater dressers 
as valets, since the latter term would indicate 
that the actor employed him to lay out his 
clothes at his hotel and prepare his bath. 
Also taxicabs to the theater cannot be de- 
ducted, nor can more than a reasonable amount 
of depreciation on stage clothes, presuming 
that they are modern, be accepted. A good 
many of our readers will not be interested 
in the above-mentioned luxuries any more than 
is the writer of this artic'e, but it is news 
and something which we were expected to in- 
Quire into. 


New York Deputies Meet 


The deputies in the New York district in- 
vited to meet the Special Committee appointed 
by the Council to inquire into their problems 
got together the end of last week. The re- 
sult was a most interesting and informative 
discussion. These meetings will be repated 
monthly. 


Outlawing the Anti-Unionist 


The following resolution has been passed by 
the Council: 


“RESOLVED, that the Council of the Act- 
ors’ Equity Association express its great ad- 
miration of the aqrenens work being done by 
the Actors’ Association of Britain. The al- 
Hiance between the two associations ifs close 
today, but it is the aim of Equity to make 
it even closer by the drawing up a definite 


—*BARNEY’S” 


The ever increasing demand for 


TOE DANCING 


654 8th Ave., 


SHORT VAMP 
THEATRICAL 
AND NOVELTY 


unfailing standard as to Quality, Service and Comfort in our footwear. 
A FEW OF THE PRODUCTIONS USING OUR SHOES: 


ZIEGFELD FOLLIES MUSIC BOX REVUE HIPPODROME 
ZIEGFELD FROLIC GOOD MORNING DEARIE GREENWICH VILLAGE FOLLIES 
SALLY LOVE LETTER TANGERINE 

Shoes made to order and in stock. 


Mail Orders filled promptly. 
Catalogue sent upon request. 


“BARNEY’S” 


SHOES— 


BARNEY SHOES is proof of our 


SLIPPERS A SPECIALTY 


NEW YORK CITY. 


TRU 


SCHWIEDER’S TRUNK CO. 


NOTICE 
H. & M. Professional 


Write for Catalog, No War Tax. 


NKS 


Springfield, Mo. 


scl 


slack. White, Flesh B FREE. 


HORT VAMP SHOES 


85 FOR STAGE AND STREET AT MODERATE PRICES. 
\ 5 = Strap Pump. Cope 225 Ww 424 St. Stage Last Pumps Flats. Balleta—Roxr 
New York. Reilable Mail Order Dept. 


or Soft Toe 


Tdeal location, about 40 minutes from Broadway. 
improvement. 
Houses. 
drives. Ideal year-round place. Kent free and 
fruit, which will pay cost of all help and taxes, 
for someone. Must be sem to be appreciated. 


BARNETT 


HEALTH - WEALTH - HAPPINESS 


“Gentleman's farm. Teautiful residence, 
ll Acres, Garage, Chicken-Wood Houses. 
200 apple trees, plum, cherry, quince, pear. 


known 

Corn Crib, Stock Barn, Help and auffeur 
verry, currant twrshea. Spacious lawns and 
large interest on investment derived from gale of 
rice $30,000.00. Cash required, $15,000.00, 


& CO., 11 East 125th Street. New York City. 


ON 


Vice-President © 
Cor. Y “ge See. 


Yi 
4, 


Y 


working agreement to meet every continge. 

“In order to protect both associations” mad 
outlaw actors Equity asks the A. A. of RB. 
for the names of all non-members and doe. 
Jinquents who may be leaving England for this 
country and in its turn Equity will keep the 
A. A. of B. informed of all American actors 
sailing for England who do not belong to 
Equity.” 
More Time on Thanksgiving Day Fund 

Contributions 

In view of the bad theatrical season, the 
Council has determined to extend payments on 
the Thanksgiving Day Fund to December 31, 


Entertainment Officials Appointed 
Lynn Overman has been made chairman of 
the 1922 Entertainment Committee. Hasgard 
Short will be the advisory director. 


The Radiograft 

The Radiograph is a wonderful invention and 
is enjoyed by hundreds of thousands of peo 
ple. A good many prominent actors and act- 
resses have been invited to speak into it and 
have done so without charge. But now we 
learn that it is entering into competition with 
the theater, since citizens prefer to sit at 
home and be entertained for nothing rather 
than go out into the night and spend their 
good money for theater tickets. In order to 
draw the attention of our members to this 
matter the Council has passed the following: 


“RESOLVED, that the attention of our mem- 
bers be drawn to the fact that the Radiograph 
is a profitable commercial enterprise which 
also in way enters into competition with 
the theater and that therefore our members 
be advised to seek proper compensation 4 
any services they may be invited to give to 
the Radiograph Company.”’ 


the Radiograph Co.""—FRANK GILLMORD, 
Executive Secy. 


New Members 
Thirty-three new members were elected at 
the last Council meeting, held Tuesday, March 
7, as follows: 


New Candidates 

Regular Members—Mrs. P. R. Allen, James 
F. Ayres, Sonia Baraban, Margaret C. Camp 
bell, Rita Coakley, Ada Curry, Charles Ellis, 
Herman Ergotti, V. Dom Gazzolo, Minna Gom- 
bell, Charles Casper Grohs, J. A. [ilmartin, 
Jack L. Leigh, Charles E. Miles, Vera Myers 
and Hughie H. Roman, 

Members Without Vote (Junior Members)— 
William F. Flanagan, George Ray Gayton, Alan 
H. Petch and Marion W. Tolford. 

Chicago Office 

Regular Members—Oliver J. Eckhardt, Helen 

T. Martelle and Elsie Stevens. 


Kansas City Office 

Regular Members—Irene Mae Boyd, Babe 
Bradley, Harry V. Cheshire and Richard H. 
Ryan. 

Member Without Vote (Junior Member)— 
Caroline Hannab. 

Motion Picture Section 
Regular Member—Mario Carillo. 


Los Angeles Office 
Regular Members—Philippe de Lacy, 
riett Hellen and Edward Z. Roberts. 
Member Without Vote—Valentine Churchill. 


SLOAN’S EASES PAIN 
RELIEVES THE ACHE 


RMENTING, agonizing rheu- 
matic aches are quickly relieved 
by Sloan's Liniment, Apply it 
freely and enjoy a comforting sense © 
warmth. Jt penetrates without rubbing. 
Good also for sciatica, lumbago, 
neuralgia, over-exerted muscles, stift 
joints, external aches and pains, 
aches, strains and sprains. 


Har- 


Don't let pain lay you up. Keep 
Sloan’s Liniment handy and at the 
first sign of an ache or pain, use it, 


for it Soctaiaie does uce results. 
At all ee eke He, $1.40. 


| | | | | &@ 
i 34 ee, ee MARCH 18, 1028 
1 TAGRORS OUTAZASSOYA ET 7 
iW Pe 
| — 
i a ee 
| TT es Nes | Ge 
| es | 
| | 1 f Ew 
a 
a - a ——— | 
aa 1 i— 
i | SS BRUSELS ee 
= = 
ee ee | 
LL 
) De 1 ° 
a 10a 
a Brummentes) 
lL } 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


35 


UY YY 


Ys UY Yi, 


yyy 4 


E ZV Y Y¥W Sil 


YYy YYy Yfy 


STA 


FARCE * COMEDY - TRAGEDY 


A DEPARTMENT OF NEWS AND OPINIONS 


(COMMUNICATIONS TO THE BILLBOARD, 1493 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y.) 


Martha Bryan Allen 


Altho Only Eighteen, Portrays 
the Flapper of 30,000 Years 
From Now 


If you've been looking at the billboards an- 
nouncing the arrival of ‘‘Back To Methuselah,”* 
at the Garrick Theater, New York, you've prob- 
ably gathered the impressions that the new 
three-performance Shaw play, now being in- 
troduced to New York by the Theater Guild, is 
made up of long-bearded patriarchs, of whom 
Old Man Methuselah has grown the longest 
beard. We had that impression, too, until we 
got acquainted with ‘‘Methuselah,’’ and learned 
thet the play not only goes back to the sup- 
posed beginning of time, but as far into the 
future as the mind can reach. And Martha 
Bryan Allen, as the “‘flapper’’ of 30,000 years 
from now, is one of the bright stars in the 
Methuselan sky of the distant future. She 
plays the role of the ‘‘Newly-born Flapper of 
30,000 Years from Now," in the last cycle of 
the play, as well as the role of the Envoy's 
danghter in the second cycle. 

Little Miss Allen was born in Louisville 
Ky., exactly eighteen years ago. After gradu- 
ating from high school she migrated North 
to the American Academy of Dramatic Art. 
While still in her student days she was chosen 
for a tiny part in Al Jolson's ‘‘Aloha,” a comedy 
part, if you please, despite the fact that 
Martha appears to be destined to play ‘Baby 
Bunting’’ ingenue roles. 

After a while the Theater Guild discovered 
her and gave her the role of the maid, in 
“The Wife With a Smile,’’ in which smal} 
part she attracted favorable mention by the 
critics. She did so well with her maid part 
that the Theater Guild promoted its youngest 
protege by placing her in the cast of ‘“‘He Who 
Gets Slapped,” supporting that other ideal 
ingenve, Margalo Gillmore. 

Then along came ‘‘Methuselah,”” with a cry- 
ing need for a ‘“‘chicadee actress’’ to portray the 
budding flapper of 30,000 years from now. But 
the Theater Guild didn’t have to seek far for 
the futuristic flapper. They took Martha Bryan 
Allen away from her trapeze-girl role in ‘“‘He 
Who Gets S'apped’® and placed her in the 
“lap of the future.” It will be interesting 
to see what Misa Allen finds there. 


HUGH WARD CHANGES PLANS 


New York, March 10.—Hugh Ward, who has 
been managing director of J. E. Williamson, 
Ltd., has disposed of his interest in that firm 
and announces that he has taken over a large 
circuit of theaters in Australia. 

Mr. Ward is en route back to New York 
from Australia, He will complete negotiations, 
already vtarted by cable, for rights of all the 
notable successes of the present theatrical sea- 
son for presentation in Australia. 

It is said that Mr. Ward has unlimited finan- 
cial backing, and is well able to meet the de- 
mands of local managers for the rights to their 
Tespective productions. 

Pending Mr. Ward's return to America Bert 
Levy, of “Get Together,” at the Hippodrome, is 
acting as his New York representative. 


THEATRICAL SQUARE 
CLUB'S ENTERTAINMENT 


New York, March 13.—The Theatrical Square 
Club (affiliated with the National League of 
Masonic Clubs), comprising producers, mana- 
gers, playwrights, actors, stage hands and any- 
one earning his livelihood from the theater, will 
give its first annual entertainment and ball at 
the Yorkville Casino, Eighty-sixth street, east 
of Third avenue, Tuesday evening, March 21. 

An ‘all-star entertainment is being arranged 
by a leading New York theatrical producer, and 
the proceeds will go toward a relief fund for 
the benefit of sick and distressed members. 

It is said that many operatic, dramatic, mo- 
tion picture and vaudeville stars have promised 
to appear in person at the entertainment. 


FUND ADOPTS RESOLUTION 
ON DEATH OF JOS. GRISMER 


New York, March 9.—At a meeting of the 
Board of Trustees of the Actors’ Fund of Amer!- 
ea, held today, it unanimously adopted a pream- 
bie and resolution extolling the virtues of Joseph 
R. Grismer, who died recently after years of 
service as an officer of the organization. 


MUSICAL TABS. 


To Be Presented by Stage Women’s 
Exchange 


New York, March 10.—The National Stage 
Women’s Exchange, Inc., which has as its ob- 
ject the provision of employment for actresses 
out of engagements, will give a series of mu- 
sical teas, which will be held every Sunday 
afternoon from 4 to 6 o'clock. 

Hilda Spong is president, Anita Clarendon is 
vice-president and Margaret Allen is treasurer 
and manager of the Stage Women’s Exchange. 
The exchange now has a full-fledged beauty 
parlor, presided over by specialists. 


DOROTHY PARKER ARRIVES 


New York, March 9.—Dorothy Parker, daugh- 
ter of the author of ‘‘Pomander Walk,” ‘‘Dis- 
raeli’? and other plays, is now in New York, 
having sailed from England to join her husband, 
Lennox Pawley, the English comedian, who is 
now appearing in ‘‘Marjolaine’’ at the Broad- 
hurst Theater. 

Miss Parker was the original ‘‘Marjolaine’’ in 
the Wallack production of ‘‘Pomander Walk,” 
which was presented in London eleven years ago, 
and from which the musical comedy, ‘‘Marjo- 
laine,”’ was adapted. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pawley have taken up their 
abode at 225 West Sixty-ninth street. 


MARTHA BRYAN ALLEN 


fThe youngest member of the Theater Guild’s new three-cycle play, “‘Back to Methuselah,” now playing 
at the Garrick Theater, New York. 


“BULL DOG DRUMMOND” 


Approaches Hundredth Performance 


New York, March 13.—‘Bull Dog Drum- 
mond", Charles Dillingham’s melodramatic 
success at the Knickerbocker Theater, is now 
approaching its 100th New York performance, 
after providing New Yorkers for the last three 
months with, the press department says, 
the greatest number of laughs and thrills con- 
ta‘ned in any one piece presented on the Broad- 
way stages ths year. 

A. E, Matthews is featured, while the sup- 
porting company includes C. H. Croker-King, 
Sam Livesey, Geoffrey Mllar, H. Franklyn 
Bellamy, St. Clair Bayfield, Tracy Baron, Wal- 
lace Hickman, George Barraud, Edward M. 
Favor, W'liam MeNeill, James A. _ Boshell, 
John W. Albaugh, Jr.; J. H. Hunt, Thomas Gil- 
len, Dorothy Tetley, Mary Robson and Cynthia 
Latham. 


COFFEE FOR “METHUSELAH” 
' AUDIENCE 


New York, March 8.—Last Monday night 
those who sacr‘ficed their dinners to attend the 
second third of the ‘‘Back to Methuselah" cy- 
cle, which began at 7:30 p.m., at the Garrick 
Theater, were regaled between acts with cof- 
fee, wh'ch was served in the lounge of the 
theater. 


NOTABLES ON THE WAY 
TO CHICAGO THEATERS 


Chicago, March 10.—New stars on the way to 
Chicago are plentiful. William Gillette will 
be here soon, on an unnamed date, with ‘‘The 
Dream Maker’, in a theater also not yet agreed 
upon, 

Pauline Lord will bring Eugene O'Neill's 
“Anna Christie’’ to the Princess after Grace 
George gets thru there in ‘‘The Exquisite 
Hour’’. Miss Lord, a favorite in Chicago, will 
get a warm welcome. 

Ed Wynn is dated for this city, too, and will 
bring his revue from a prosperous run of sev- 
eral months in New York. He will play at the 
Illinois about six weeks hence. 


LEO CARRILLO RETURNS 


New York, March 10.—Leo Carrillo is back 
in New York after a tour of 21 weeks thra 
the South in ‘Lombardi, Ltd.”’ 

It is said that Mr. Carrillo will busy himself 
with a plunge into vaudeville during the next 
few weeks, awaiting the completion of a new 
play by Frederick and Fanny Hatton, which 
will be under the management of Oliver Mor- 
osco. 

Mr. Carr‘llo has not always been a character 
comed'an. He began his career as a cartoonist 
on The San Francisco Examiner. 


CHICAGO LOOP SHOWS 


Are Getting Excellent Patronage— 
“Lightnin’” Still Leader After 
Six Months’ Run 


Chicago, March 13.—The situation in Loop 
playhouses indicates solidity and some rather 
surprising features. For instance, the amazing 
Vitality of Walker Whiteside’s ‘‘The fiindoo,”’ 


at the Shubert-Central, hinted to have become 
very reluctantly occupied by that star, is one 
of the season's wonders. After seven weeks 
Mr. Whiteside is holding the business in the 


neighborhood of $10,000. Frank Bacon's 
“‘Lightnin’'’ knocks along after six months at 
the Blackstone at around $20,000 a week and 
doesn’t seem to have more than touched the 
edges yet and is in a class by itself. 

Lester Bryant planted a live one jn the 
little Playhouse in ‘The Nightcap.” After 
nine weeks it appears stronger than ever. 
Other big bets are ‘“‘Bluebeard's Eighth Wife,’’ 
at the Garrick. Predictions for a long run for 
the ‘Wife’? are made and it js getting real 
business. ‘Two Little Girls in Blue,’ follow- 
ing the ‘‘Follies,” at the Colonial, stepped 
off to promising things and grows apace. Lee 
Shubert and A. L. Erlanger, sitting side by 
side, viewed the opening. 

Lionel Barrymore, in ‘‘The Claw,"’ has put 
a splendid business into the Princess Theater, 
which has held up like old times. He will 
leave March 18 to make way for Grace George 
in “The Exquisite Hour.”’ 

Cosmo Hamilton's ‘‘The Silver Fox’’ caught 
on heavily at the La Salle, is now on its third 
week and has had all of the critics boosting 
it from the om ning. 

Zoe Akins’ ‘‘The Varying Shore,’ starring 
Elsie Ferguson, at the Woods Theater, appears 
of uncertain popularity here. The critics flock 
to Miss Ferguson, but take off the veil a bit 
in their references to the play, which they don’t 
seem to like. The play will move on after this 
week. 

“Nice Peopte,’’ nearly five months at the 
Cort, with Francine Larirmore, apparently has 
neither need nor notion of moving out. 

D. W. Griffith is carrying full-page advertis- 
ing in the dailies exploiting his film, ‘Orphans 
of the Storm,” at the Shubert-Northern. ‘‘Lit- 
the Old New York,’’ with Genevieve Tobin, 
stands up strong at Cohan’s Grand, after 
nearly four months. Frances Starr, in ‘‘The 
Easiest Way,’’ at the Powers Theater, is 
playing to a moderate and gradually growing 
clientele in the third week of the play. Newer 
arrivals are William Hodge, in ‘‘Dog Love,"’ at 
the Studebaker, now on his second week; Mitzi, 
in ‘Lady Billy,’’ at the Illinois, and “Only 
38,"" with Mary Ryan, on its third week at 
the Olympic. 

Billetings for the near future are, besides 
Miss George at the Princess: Billie Burke, at 
the Powers, March 20, in “The Intimate 
Strangers;’"’ ‘‘Ladies’ Night,"” at the Woods, 
March 20, and ‘‘The O’Brien Girl,’? at Cohan’s 
Grand, April 3. 


ARNOLD DALY IN NEW ROLE 


New York, March 1.—Arthur Hopkins has an- 
nounced that he will soon present Arnold Daly 
in a new comedy, ‘‘Voltaire,”” at the Plymouth 
Theater. 

The story revolves around the personality of 
the great French philosopher, Voltaire, and is 
the work of two new playwrights, Leila M. 
Taylor and Gertrude M. Purcell. It is said that 
Mr. Hopkins was so favorably impressed with 
the play that he placed it in rehearsal a few 
days after its arrival at his office, which was 
but several weeks after its completion. 

“Voltaire’’ is not a biographical play, but 
presents one day in the life of the great French 
philosopher, during his exile from Paris in the 
Chateau at Ferney, in the year 1765, an excit- 
ing day, filled with highly amusing incidents. 

The settings for the new comedy, which will 
be produced under Mr. Hopkins’ personal super- 
vision, are being designed by Robert Edmond 
Jones. 


“PYGMALION” 


Chicago, March 10.—A_ performance of 
“Pygmalion” was given at the Blackstone 
Theater the afternoon of March 7 which in- 
cidentally gave the public an ins’ght into the 
workings of a new intercommunity theater 
project. The guild sponsoring the play has 
given successful performances in Evanston, 
Lake Forest, Kenilworth and Winnetka. The 
matinee in question was g'ven to aid the work 
of the Chicago Drama League on the Municipal 
Pier this summer. The entire membership of 
the guild actors, stage hands, designers, di- 
rectors, musicians, electr‘cians and playwrights, 
are recruited from professional craftsmen. Al 
are volunteers. 


ANOTHER BENEFIT 

New York, March 13.—New York, which 
has been the scene of so many successful 
benefits during the first two months, will 
have another one in April. It will be the 
annual benefit of the Treasurers’ Club of 
America, and will be held at the Hudson Thea- 
ter, thru the courtesy of Henry B. Harris, 
Sunday night, April 23. 


= a = a 
nee reeeeeeee eee ee cS ae 
nnn sss sheen 7 

od 
Yy Yy YY Ufyy YY — YY YH Uqvyywy : —_ Fe Yyy WV) ; 
/ YY, =, Hf YY YY NY Y/, Wy y Yy Yl 
= YY Y Yj YY j yy one | 
/ y Wh YY D Yj J, Y/ DP Go pe y Yfy 
yy ~" YY , 4 Yj Yy YY | L j - Y . 
Yj 4 lj Yj y A . Vj — | 
Mvp Yj) 
ee Q 
$ 
a ot es oa 
| 
é 
: 
nee EP 
: > 
a 2 OOS ee a : 
ES : . iMZ~_— * , me 
a —_ Pp tie 4 a Py ae 
a ot, og eh ~ Ph i 2 ; igo °° ni , roi - / 
» «  . = ipeammeellle mam : ang f S ae Wy if wo ye S 
bs .© a % a ie a ete - Pee So an ‘ 
6 ee ae “* ~ SS tS —— ay z a ea 
eee ee Pats ae a ee ea 4 - 7 = = -S pe | 
of ig: es ae é . : & TR . : a ers eS _ . 
a A + ek a ‘| Jee, 
if — PA _£ 4 4 << <‘ . =“ ; » ee Fug ey ) . ; 
2 ea px, _ in ‘ P X s 5 Es kare baie J 
et ) - : 
‘ ae Ras oe _ "7 ¥ Be 4 ai, i 
FS Se 4 Be _ a os is ny 2 es a . fo 
7 3 § , %.. —— ‘ 
ak he : 
7 ' gd 8 ns ra - : 
- Be on. * : 
’ - ia ; : ee . 
| ae No | 
- 3 MU oe ee OL i : 
‘ Bet Ce ss 
i 
' : 
que 
1 
4 ' 
: | 
| 
: 4 
g 
| | Tae 
7 } a 
pa 4 
- : 
’ 5 Ve, 
; { : 


a 


| 


: 
: 
2 


nee 


— 
eee 
ah ig 


SO or Be ae 


- 
a 


Prine 


a 
Se ee as 


——————— 
te 


3 


~—ar, 


ete let ey 


The Billboard 


&@ 


MARCH 18, 1922 


FASHIONS 


BEAUTY 


(COMMUNICATIONS TO ELITA MILLEB LENZ, CARE OUR NEW YORK CFFICES) 


SIDE GLANCES 


THE SHOPPER 


The services of the Shopper are free to the 
readers of The Billboard. It is advisable, 
however, to observe the following rules: Send 
stamps for replies. Make all money orders 
payable to The Billboard Publishing Company. 
Send separate money orders to cover each 
afticle so that they may be turned over to 
the individual shops. 


L 

The topless corset of rubberized webbing ap- 
peared to be the latest thing the corset shops 
had to offer, but we wanted to be sure, So 
we visited a corset authority, an official of 
one of the best-known corset manufacturing 
companies, The corset and brassiere illustrated 
were pointed out by him as the ideal 
“gcientific’’ corset, as well as the one 
most in keeping with the straight lines of the 
moment. (His remarks on corsets appear in 
the column next to the illustration.) 

The corset is a hip model, made from a com- 
bination of rubber webbing and pink brocade, 
boned at the points of greatest strain with 
short, lightweight, flexible boning. It is ideal 
for the dancer or the actress who depends 
upon freedom of action for grace. The price 
is $6.00. ‘ 


The brassiere 1s made especially for the top- 
less corset. It comes well down over the top 
of the new low corset and fits snugly at the 
waist, hips and back. Inserts of rubber web- 
bing at the side make it possible to fasten the 
brassiere with ease. It is made of pink silk 
brocade and is priced at $3.00. Sizes, 34 to 46. 


3. 

The woman who is thinking of buying one 
of the new Jersey frocks for street wear when 
she lays off her coat and dons her fur scarf 
will be glad to know of an exclusive little shop 
where the theatrical woman buys at a ten per 
cent discount. The model in mind is a slip-on, 
with a bateau neck. It comes in navy blue, 
with gray Angora wool cross-stitching at neck 
and sleeves, and is finished with a braided wool 
girdle. It may also de had in brown, with red 
stitching; dark brown on tan and in a number 
of other attractive combinations. The price is 
$29.50. 

4. 


Dainty collars of sheer white organdy may 
be purchased at the Stage Door Inn, 43 West 
Forty-seventh street, New York, for $1. There 
is now a beauty parlor at the Inn, where hair- 
dressing and manicuring are done under the 
supervision of experts. 

5. 

The new spring slip-over sweaters, with batenu, 
V or round necks, developed from a soft, pliant 
quality of Shetland wool, are being sold by 
one of the best Fifth avenue shops, for $10. 
In all the new light-toned shades that symbol- 
ize spring—tan, blue, violet. Also in navy, 
brown and black. 


6. 

Some of our friends on the road have been 
writing in and asking for the name of a re- 
fable shoe shop sending out a catalog. We 
Ye learned the name of a shoe shop sending 
an eight-page folder, illustrating stage and 
street shoes, includiug ballet and buck and wing 
styles. Name on reqnest. 

~ & 

The Spanish-influenced Paisley skawis that 
are the delight of dancers, because of their 
draping possibilities, may be had at the shop 
that offers theatrical women a ten per cent 
discount. They are woven into Paisley designs 
from silken threads that resemble crepe de 
chine and are edged with deep black silk fringe. 
These shawls are not only a becoming article 
of personal adornment, but offer enriching color 
tones for interior decoration. 

4. 

Some New York actresses are buying under- 
wear from a man who calls at the home. He 
carries a most unusual assortment of extra 
fine crepe de chine step-in and chemise com- 
binations, trimmed with Baby Irish lace, which 
he is selling at $7.50. 


BEAUTY NOTES 


Katherine MacDonald contributes @ valaable 
suggestion to a current beauty magazine. 
says that the rouge and lipstick should always 
match. 


ss 
Afi actress who is very much in the 
this season because of her beauty and talent, 


SHE LIVES A “DOUBLE LIFE” 

Ruth Berse, who is playing a part in “Law- 
ful Larceny,’ at the Republic Theater, New 
York, and is assistant theatrical press agent 
by day, except Wednesday and Saturday after- 
noons, when she must play matinees, succeeds 
in doing both things well without loss of sleep 
or poise. To take a peek at Ruth is to get a 
fore-glimpse of the woman of the future, who 
will contradict the pessimists by being both 
pretty and clever. 


A MAN’S NECKTIES 
There was one thing that Mary objected to 
about Douglas Fairbanks, but she was clever 
enough not to tell him about it until they were 
married. That one and only thing was Doug’s 
neckties. After the wedding day Mary bun- 
died up all of Doug's neckties, so the story 


runs, and gave them to Bill Hart. But what 
Bill Hart did with the neckties when Mary 
wasn’t looking is another story. 


WHO WANTS THIS INFANT PRODIGY? 


A New York woman is the mother of a very 
wonderful boy of eight, who studies philosophy, 
psychology and metaphysics. She thought the 
boy was a wonder until she sent him to buy a 
pair of mercerized shields for her new gown. 
After several hours the boy returned, weary and 
without the shields. 

“‘Mother,’’ said the prodigy, patronizingly, 
“you were misinformed about the shields. I 
have discovered that there is no such thing as a 
mesmerized shield. 


MAN AS A FASHION CRITIC 

Marjorie Gateson, in the new musical com- 
edy, ‘“‘For Goodness’ Sake,”” now playing at the 
Lyric Theater, New York, carries an odd color 
complement to an evening dress that has wild 
cherry as its dominating color. It is a “‘spine- 
less” fan; long strands of emerald green willow 
tied together with a ribbon, with a wristband. 
A man in the audience asked his wife why 
women bothered with such ridiculous “fol de 
rols."* His wife replied with one word that 
meant volumes to her: “STYLE.” 

Then Charles Judels, playing the role of a 
lady-killer count, remarked that Miss Gateson’s 
fan reminded him of his grandfather's beard. 
That remark sent the said husband into a 
gale of approving laughter, but his wife gave 
him a withering glance. 


THE VANITY BOX 


(a) 

A beauty epecialist who caters to society 
Women told The Shopper to browse around 
among the cosmetics. The browsing brought to 
light a new, odd and beautiful rouge. It is of 
a rich, creamy consistency that reminds one of 
those velvet-textured evaporating creams, and 
you blend it to please your fancy. It comes in 
three different shades: A deep carnation pink 
for the blond, a deep rose for the brunet and a 
still deeper shade for the darkest skin. It is 
$2.00 a jar. This is made for sensitive skins 
that cannot endure dry rouges. 


(b) 

A woman chemist, who makes a specialty of 
facial beautification, has just perfected a 
medicated mudpack for the woman who is 
troubled with skin blemishes. It is $2.00 a 
package, and she adapts it to meet individual 
needs. She also prepares in her laboratory a 
freckle and liver spot lotion, which is applied 
to the face before powerding. It is sixty cents. 


says she has ceased having birthdays. Counting 
age by years invites age, she says. 

Mme. Helena Rubinstein says that complex- 
fons should be studied well before they are 
treated, which unodubtedly accounts for that 


She lady's remarkable success as a beauty doctor. 


When you are nervous or depressed the best 
remedy is a change of thought. A bright mu- 
sical comedy, a good book or a brisk walk 
work wonders as “thought changers."’ 


(c) 

The permanent ronge mentioned by The Shop- 
per in last week's issue may now be had in 
trial tubes for ten cents, plus postage. 

(a) 

Since waved hair is almost a necessity it is 
g00d to know that one may wave one’s hair at 
home with aluminum water waving combs that 
cost only $1.50 a set of six. 

(e) 

There is a good, nonirritating depilatory on 

the market for fifty cents a bottle. It is not 


permanent in effect, but may be used frequently 
with confidence, 


SELECTING THE CORSET 


Selecting the right corset is somewhat of a 
problem if one starts out to find it in the 
shops. They offer such a medley of different 
Styles that selection assumes the aspect of a 
“lottery.” Unless one has expert knowledge 
one is at the mercy of the corsetiere, who may 
be interested in pushing the sale of a particu- 
lar make. 

To gain a bit of expert knowledge on the sub- 
ject of corsets The Shopper visited a man who 
knows the corset market from A to Z, who al- 
ways has his fingers on the ‘pulse of style” and 
knows statistics, too. 

“They are not wearing so many corsets as 
they used to?’* ventured The Shopper. 

“They weren't, but they are,”’ replied the 
expert. ‘‘This winter marked the grand come- 
back of the corset. There are 100,000,000 peo- 
ple in the United States. Of that number there 


SKIRTS GROW LONGER; 
SLEEVES GROW SHORTER 


Claudia Muzio, who sang at the Metropolitan 
Opera House for the first time last Saturday 
night in the revival of the opera “Loreley,” 
looked to Hickson to carry out her decidedly 
individual teas about style for general and 
stage wear. 

As a result Hickson has provided the diva 
with gowns that are marvels of clinging grace, 
the long lines of the classic mode being em- 
Dhasized, especially in the matter of skirt 
length. Muzio is quoted as saying that the 
long skirt pleases her. ‘It is more graceful 
and more feminine. I have never liked that 
fashion for the short skrit. It gives no char- 
acter. It is merely young. On some it js 
grotesque. To me the style taken from the 
Louis periods, the fitted bodice and the full, 
long skirt, is more picturesque, more charming 
and above all more aristocratic. It makes the 
‘wearer important."’ 


Nora Bayes Confirms Muzio 

At the Speyer Memorial Benefit, which took 
Place at the Shubert Theater, New York, Fri- 
day, March 10, Nora Bayes was a delightful 
confirmation of Muzio’s judgment that a long 
ekirt makes the wearer important (with all 
due deference to Nora's effervescent person- 
ality). She stepped before the footlights in a 
pale gray crepe de chine frock, with a gray 
coiffure (a wig, of course) dressed high. The 
frock was long lined, in bodice and skirt length, 
and was elaborated with steel beads. Gray 
suede pumps peeked coquettishly beneath Nora's 
skirt. She was indeed sa symphony in gray. 

Of course, Nora Bayes wasn't a bit gray as 
to mood and action. She was colorful, and, as 
usual, had a “surprise up her eleeve.”’ She 
unfurled a huge ostrich fan, as wide as she 
was tall, of a vivid coral pink, and made it 
dance in terms of waving undulations. Yes, 
she was a piquant combination of pompadour 
dignity and twentieth century verve. 


Sleeves Disappearing 

But to return to the subject of Muzio’s Hick- 
Gon gowns. They are practically sleeveless. 
One of ber “Loreley” gowns has none. But 
that is the way of the Paris evening gowns, with 
their wide shoulder line, long waist, lengthened 
skirt and modified drape. 

Looped strands of beads sometimes take the 
place of sleeves and compose the girdle, which 
encircles the waist loosely and terminates in a 
medallion. 

A very charming evening dress of Periwinkle 
blue mousseline de Sole, designed for a Pari- 
sian stage beauty, has a girdle of jet beads 
that terminate in long strands at both hips. 

The bead girdle offers a suggestion for bring- 
ing last season's evening gown up to date. 

French dots, in two-tone combinations, as 
well as fancy weaves, are the latest in veils. 
The new veil shades are Periwinkle on a com- 
plementary background, and dent de lion. The 
shops afte showing many black and white com- 
binations. Rust and Copen are also shown. 


_—<$—<$<—<—$———————————————————SeEeeeeEeeesees 


are 20,000,000 women over 16 who are wearing 
corsets, This year’s output is 35,000,000," with 
masculine terseness. ‘‘Certainly since they are 
bought and paid for they are worn.” 

“Yes, but how about the style?’ 

“The style for straight lines has made 4 
corset imperative. The woman who discarded 
corsets now visits the corsetiere and asks: 
‘What shall I do for my figure? It's getting 
lompy.’ 

“The corsetieres of the country report that 
the average waist measurement has expanded 
to twenty-three inches. 

“Yes, the corset has come back. But it has 
come back in a different form. It must serve 
both comfort and beauty. So we have the 
modified corset, a sort of (with a grin) half 
and half. It is the hip corset. It is ideal, 
because it allows freed mo t and free- 
dom of the breath control organ. It is & 
necessity to this dancing generation, the delight 
of the ballet dancer.” ; 

“And a necessity to the complexion, too.’ 
supplemented The Shopper, recalling the ad- 
monition of a beauty doctor against tight cor- 
eets, which she said robbed many women of 
ily-white complexions. 

The subject of brassiere needs was broached, 
and the expert said that the new brassieres 
have been adapted to the hip-corset. Theirs is 
the double duty of firming the bust and hold- 
ing in the diaphragm. The new brassiere must 
insure an unbroken waist line, free from un- 
sightly bulging. 

“For,”" concluded the expert, “‘this is the age 
of the sane, beautiful and healthful straight 
lined figure.’ 


BLANCHE YURKA TO 
GIVE SPECIAL MATINEES 


New York, March 11.—Blanche Yorka, who 
impersonates the character of ‘Joan Fowler," 
in William A. Brady’s “The Law Breaker, 
which moves from the Booth Theater to the 
Times Square Theater, Monday, March 13, wil! 
appear in a series of matinees, The 


play will be Maeterlinck’s “Monna Vanna.” 


il] 36 es oleate 
| KK) ge Gs 
) WSS SHI 

: Femi CrVuve Sreitts 

| 7 es es GOSSIP 

a 

| es ee 

i a a 

| / a 

| _ ; 

ik be] 

i REN 

\ “a : ra 

| Se: 

i MIN | Ae + 

i ([ NNW | ne a 

it  \ RES 

Be | ( CW), 

1 <2 ee 

=_ ee —— 
\\ 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


SILKS Sano 


THEATRICALS OUR SPECIALTY 


BRILL SILK STORE 


658 6th Ave. NEW YORK Fitzroy 523 


BEAUTIFYING REQUISITES 
At Wholesale Prices To The Profession 


Masage Vibrators, Hair Dryers. 

REFILLABLE POWDER PUFFS 
Violet Ray Apparatuses, Electric Curling Irons. 
Face Powders, Rouges, Lipsticks, Eyebrow Pen- 
cils and eezers, Facial] Creams, Hairdressing 
Specialties. RAL SPEC Implements. 

GENE i SPECIALTY Sects co., 

tol West rt ,* 

MA 


W YORK CITY 
IL ORDERS SOLICITED. 


COSTUMES 
ae” <e Morkmanshi® MADE TO ORDER 


We are equipped to fur- 
nish Costumes on short no- 
lice at a moderate price. 

Write for estimates and 
Suggestions. 


Costumes and Wigs to Hire. Make-Up. 


TIMES SQUARE COSTUME CO, Inc, 


Co-operating with 


BECO MANUFACTURING £8, 
109 West 48th Street. 


ORK CITY. 


THE NATIONAL foneenyvereay OF DRA- 


F. F. MACKAY 


Thorough Treteins School on ee the Stage and 


Vocal ercises. = year 
ra “ART OF ooTING™ ‘for sale 
t Conservato 
oom Til, 148 W, 45th St., New York, W. ¥. 


meatrican COSTUMER unistoricar 


Amateur Plays Correctly Costumed. 
CARL A. WUSTL, 
(Est. 50 Years) 
Tel., 1628 Stuyvesant. 40 Union 8q., New Verk. 


PARAMOUNT PLAY CO. 
PLAYS for Rep., Stock, Road, SKETCHES Boncht 
1400 BROADWAY. NEW YORK CITY. 


STAGE CAREER AGENCY 


1493 Broadway, Room 422, NEW YORK. 
Persona] management, all branches. We and 
contract to place, Not ordinary school. 


JACK MILLS, Inc. 
MUSIC PUBLISHERS 

152 West 45th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 


. 


=. 
a 


a 
SUGGESTS © 


AM 


for Vaudeville and- Concert 
Singers, Quartets, Chautau- 
qua Artists, Orchestras, Etc. 


eB) 


ANY MATERIAL 
YOU MAY DESIRE 
FOR THIS PURPOSE 
WILL BE SENT 
ON REQUEST. 


DRAMATIC NOTES 


“Dulcy’”’ left the Frazee Theater, New York, 
last Saturday night, after 246 performances. 

John Willard was the guest of honor at the 
reception of the Comedy Club, which was held 
at the Hotel Astor, New York, Friday afternoon, 
March 10. 

William Courtenay, who has been playing in 
“The Law Breaker,"’ at the Booth Theater, New 
York, moved to the Times Square Theater Mon- 
day evening, March 13. 

“Captain Applejack’"’ has attained its eighty- 
second performance at the Cort Theater, New 
York. Wallace Eddinger and Mary Nash are 
still its bright and particular stars. 

Doris Keane gave her thirtieth performance of 
“The Czarina’’ at the Empire Theater, New 
York, last Tuesday night, and is still drawing 
crowds in spite of a few caustic critics. 

Robert Haines, Herbert Druce and Wilfred 
Lytell have been engaged to support Marjorie 
Rambeau in “Up,”’ a new play by Gladys Un- 
ger, to be produced by Messrs. Shubert and 
A. H. Woods at an early date. 

“To the Ladies,”’ at the Liberty Theater, 
New York, starring Helen Hayes and O:to 
Kruger, is an old toast that is being drunk by 
the amusement-seeking public in a new play in 
the form of a ticket-buying orgy. 

John Willard, author of ‘‘The Cat and the 
Canary,” playing at the National Theater, New 
York, was the guest of honor at the Drama- 


Comedy reception held at the Hotel Astor, New 
York, Friday afternoon, March 10, 

Laurette Taylor, who has closed in “The 
National Anthem,’’ has by no means closed her 
after-dinner speaking engagements. She will 
make a speech at the luncheon to be given by 
the Women’s City Club at the Hotel McAlk 
pin, New York, March 24, 

Lucile Watson, playing in Brady’s “The 
Nest,’’ at the Forty-eighth Street Theater, New 
York, will participate in the benefit entertain- 
ment for the Home Club for working women, 
which will be given at the Hotel Pennsylvania 
at an eariy date under the auspices of Mra, 
Willard D. Straight. 

Tlarry Andrews, who has one of the most ime 
portant roles in ‘“‘The First Man.” now playing 
at the Neighborhood Playhouse, New York, cele 
ebrated his twenty-fifth year on the stage on 
March 8. Mr. Andrews had been away from 
the stage for twenty years, playing the role 
of director, before he played in Owen Davis’ 
“The Detour’ early this season. 

Kilbourn Gordon, Inc., announces that it 
has filed for future disposition five offers from 
London managers for the English rights to ‘‘The 
Cat and the Canary,"’ as well as others from 
French, German, South African and Scandinavian 
producers. The latest offer was received last 
week from Michitaro Ongawa, the Japanese 
actor and playwright, who is now sojourning 


The Sounds of English 


327 West 56th Street 


The Spoken Word! 


CORRESPONDENCE COURSE 
Aims to teach 


Standard Pronunciation 
Sounds in Conversation 
Voice Training in Diction 
Ear Training, Eye Training, Vocal Training, 


Better Speech Course in Preparation. 
Write for particulars. 


WINDSOR P. DAGGETT, 


NEW YORK CITY. 


in New York City, who wishes to produce the 
mystery play in Tokio. 

J. Jerome Nolan has written a new mystery 
Play, “The Thirteenth Man,” a thrilling stery 
of life among the cowboys axd cattle rustlers 
of the Southwest. 

James K. Hackett, who has been playing’ in 
England, will spend part of the summer at 
his summer home, “Zenda,’’ near Clayton, N. 
¥., according to word just received by friends 
in that village. He is now in London preparing 
to return to New York. 


Scientific Dry Cleaning 
Vanishine Process 


Removes the shine be en | 
m men’s and women’s used 
garments. Your old clothes wil) 

look like new. 


Vanishine Laboratories 


Tel., BRYant 5761. 
101 W. 42d St.. NEW YORK. 


Foumded 1894—The Incomparable 


ALVIENE [s| THEATRE 


SCHOOLS AND THEATRE 
43 West 72d Street. New York City. 
Phones: Columbus 9331, 9332, 0348, 


Acting, Sam Opera, 


We invite applicants for parts in plays to be cast for 
early production. 
Monologues, 


Elocution, Oratory. Drama _ Reading, 
w To Entertain.” 
Four _Departments—Classic Ballet and Toe, Rag Jaza 
Eccentric, Musical fe ‘nd Interpretative 
ng, 
By Expert Master Specialists, Creators and Origine 
ators. 
% ss SINGING 
ence Putting songs across. Must comedy 
and opera voice culture. Celebrities. oa Dupils— 
Harry Pilcer. Annette Kellermann, Nora Bayes, Muy 
Pickford. Alice Joyce, Florence and Mary Nash 
éeph tley. Dolly Sisters, Emma Haig 
Write for catalogue ‘io Info sation Secretary, Room 
ue to Information 
10, mentioning study desired. 


THANK YOU 


The response to our ad in The Billboard several 
es hg aso, offering Genuine FRENCH INDE- 
STRUCTIBLE PEARLS at $2 and $3 a d. 
was most gratifying, 
We will continue this sale for a short time, 
A SUGGESTION 
After pegties ny a he thems to 
earest dealer. at . arges are. 
it’s double our price it’s a fair price, 


WE OFFER THESE 


PEARLS 


24-Inch Strands.....$200 
27-Inch Strands..... 3.00 


LEE’S CURIOSITY SHOP 


NEW YORK. 


1686 BROADWAY, 


Supertiuous 


les and ether fact 
oan oma Scientifically 
nel permctnently % 


All Worle Guaranteed 


sus Hain Warts, 


(== PAULA ELECTROLYSIS COMPANY, 500 Fifth Avenue, NEW YORK. 


have it. 


The better grade of 
Solid Gold and Gold- 
Filled Jewelry. 


Gifts That Endure 


Wholesale distributors of the Richelieu 
indestructible Pearls, in lengths from 
15 to 72 inches; in price from $5.50 up. 
If it is Diamonds, Watches, Silver, Solid 
Gold oe White Stone Mounted Jewelry, we 


Illustrated Catalog mailed on request. 
Every article fully guaranteed. 
Nineteen years on Maiden Lane. 


FORSYTHE & HUNT 
Wholesale and Manufacturing Jewelers 
2™Maiden Lane 170 Broadway New York City 


Rouge Permanent 


FOOD FOR THE SKIN 


TMPARTS a complexion of RARE puarer. 
a suggestion of GLOWING YOUTH. Con- 
tains no grease or powder. and does not rub 
off—the color is a faithful reproduction of 
NATURE at its best. Trial package, 10 cents. 

mailed to any address. The charge merely 
covers the cost of mailing and material. 


AGENTS WANTED 


Prepared by 
DR. FOX LABORATORIES, 
500 Sth Ave.. Suite 516, New Yerk. 


FASHIONABLE FURS 
FOR SPRING 
25% Less Than Elsewhere 


Neckpieces 
Scarfs and Stoles 
In All Popular Furs 


best sin to those shown by_ the 
t 5th Ave. -Furrfers. and Equal 
in Style, Quality and Workmanship, 


YOUR INSPECTION INVITED. 
Mustrated Booklet Sent Out of Town 


L. Furman, /78 Gth Ave.,N.Y. 


BALDNESS—FALLING HAIR—DANDRUFF 
and all Scalp Disorder successfully treated 
with my incomparable Sun-Ray treatments. 
This is unconditionally guaranteed, provid- 
ing your hair bulbs show vitality. Those 
treatments have been gratifyingly realized by 
some of the most prominent stars in America 
and oo", ee Literature. 

PROF. ALOIS MERKE, 
Well-Known Scalp Speciallst, 


“$12 Fiith Ave., 43d St., Suite 409, New York. 
Longacre 8732. 


Ms cess es x Vaan 
dpe 
I on 
Nae nner rrr rr errr HD 
S 
Leen eee 7 
; 
TESS CT ST SS OTE RE ETE 
i | = pe | 
ae 2 
we 
oa a | 
Vay 
sh Ce 
a ee 
a _ 
—SS= ee | 
NS TD ; 
} 
A TE g ; 
Pe & 
| a SSA * ¥ 
PO | 
SE LIE AIL TANI LITE LE I NE ET TLS > 8 
ie 
a fy 
SUT eee “| 
: a} 
= _ } 
7 = ; 
3 z | 
= 6 O—E™LLEeEeEeEEeEeEeEeEeEeEee—————— | 
= = roe | if 
= — | hi , | tl ee ; 
= = Bim wee | a 
= = Bin A> | 
= => Bm . ae is g LAG 
— || Mall Che worn | 
= = Bi Soe aon EPA PSs z 
= - ae i a kas sara oa i 
= = 4 SS SS, a SN 6 > = G 3 i 4 
= —s | PA, fel ae a 4a oY ic : | 
= : \ = | WS Fa ee, & an ‘3 aoe i : S 4 — ae 
= — | Log aas ; wie 
a Tiacss Baa 
7 = a —— ei 
= = | ae . vA CO Be 
= = mt fg ee 
=" = ed Ye _ 
= = "ek i #y | 
E = a if >| ee | 
= = 2a \ aa = 1 | 
= ee : Sc \ ae 
= = . ee % 
= = Aa MOM a 
— — } 
3 = A 
STITUTE Po po : : 13 
, : 
‘T . 2 : : 
ane 
‘ a 


oT 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


THE 


“BACK TO METHUSELAH” 
A Theater Guild Production 


Act one, part one, cycle one, of “Back to 
Methuselah” shows Adam and Eve in the Gar- 
den of Eden, burdened with immortality. The 
German flood-lantern gives ethereal color and 
atmosphere to the tree-of-knowledge ang the 
riftless sky. Do the voices of the actors fit 
the scene? 

George Gaul’s voice never satisfies me, It 
is all foundation. Even as Bastien, the bar- 
room lover in “S. 8S, Tenacity,"”” I missed 
romance and creative subtlety in Mr. Gaul’s 
voice. It is a voice eof heavy, fundamental, 
vibratory force. I never think of it as a 
wind instrument with sounding space, and I 
never think of it as a bell. I think of it as 
a heavy reed with a force on it. The effect 
is a rugged, masculine tone, but it is the tone 
of a ditch<ligger. It is not a tone that catches 
experience and interprets it thru a human 
document on the stage. 

Mr. Gaul has two shifts of voice, One is 
his heavy elemental tone which is all strength 
and monotony. The other jis a more spiritaulized 
tone produced by lightening the fundamental 
tone and enlarging the resonance in the for- 
ward focus of the flowing breath. He makes 
his shift of voice somewhat mechanically, as 
if the voice that he loves is the voice on the 
fundamental note. 

The Garden of Eden, in act one of the Shaw 
play, with its scenic ether, innocent nakedness 
and coiled temptation, represents a state of 
mind. Mr. Gaul’s voice was too much clothed 
with brawn. It lacked the boundless expan- 
sion of immortality and it lacked the softness 
of indolence. Mr. Gaul’s voice had a plow 
hitched to it long before Adam learned to 
work by the sweat of his brow. 

Miss Ernita Lascelles, as Eve, had a more 
resourceful voice. It had poise and a racial 
weight that was good. It had more gamut, 
more variation, more inquiry into life than 
Adam’s voice. It had sufficient strength to 
make Eve a character to reckon with, and it 
hod sufficient change to suggest the duality of 
Eve as the go-between between 
the snake. And yet, Eve's yoice was never 
the snake's voice. It wi e@ woman's, 

Margaret Wycherly, as one might expect, 
got excellent effects as the voice of the 
serpent. But the weakness of some of her 
consonants made me believe that her skill 
Was more in management of tone than in 
absolute mastery of articulate speech. As 
the play moved on, I liked the ringing lustre 
@nd arrogance of Dennis King’s voice in the 
part of Cain. 


In part two, the voices of the Garrick Com- 
pany became a mosaic of chamceterization. 
There was maturity, deliberation and culture in 
the voices of Albert Bruning and Moffat John- 
ston as the scholars and theorists. Stanley 
Howlett is always good. In the secong cycle 
his voice has all the virile beauty that George 
Gaul’s virility lacks. StanJey Howlett by 
the very quality of his voice can still the 
theater. I heard the Garrick audience hushed 
to absolute quiet at an unexpected moment, and 
I found that it was Stanley Howlett's intelli- 
gence of voice, not Shaw's words, that was 
doing the trick. If Stanley Howlett would 
play Hamlet, even to an audience of one, I 
would be in the audience to listen. He has 
the voice and the intelligence of soul that 
ork together. 


. P. Kaye's voice in the first cycle and in 
uch of the second, has a feline suavity, an 
oratorical spontaneity and a charm of in- 
sincerity that saturates every word with the 
oi] of language. His voice is just as fluent 
and smiling and side-saddling as the rest of 
him, and the effect is a warmth of illusion. 
Altho Claude King somehow lacked finality 
in his imprint of Lubin, he was rich and 
fatherly in tone, with an arid aloofness that 
after all contrasted well with the work of 


IMPROVE YOUR SPEECH 


Learn by MAIL the new Science of 
Speech Sounds and the art of 


VOICE PRODUCTION 
FREE Booklet, with complete chart 
of English Speech symbols. Three In- 
troductory Lessons $1 (One Dollar). 


Improved Speech Association 


1270 BROADWAY, N. Y. 


SEOKEN 


Conducted by WINDSOR P. DAGGETT 


Mr. Kaye. Claude King is a cultured speaker, 
and a good actor in speech. And if Albert 
Bruning’s picture is not hung in the Garrick 
after his work as the Elderly Gent‘eman, all 
the other pictures ought to come down. No 
one walked out during that whole bour of 
Bruning-Shavian continuity! 

In the first cycle of the play, the Garrick 
company pronounced .the thir@ syllable of 
“Methuselah” with a z-sound for the letter 
“6."" This is the British pronunciation, In 
the United States we almost always hear the 
s-sound in this syllable, which is softer. In 
the second cycle of the play, the word oc- 
curred only once, and on that occasion Albert 
Bruning gave our pronunciation. 

**Methuselah’’ has several pronunciations. In 
the standard most widely used by educated 
speakers of southern England, the first syllable 
will have the i-sound in “‘it;’’ the second will 
have the glide-u in “‘use,”’ and the third will 
begin with the z-sound. The vowel of the 
third and fourth syllables has the obscure e- 
sound in “‘water.” It is not such a pretty 
spoken word as “Mesopotamia.” The glide 
of ‘“u’’ is sometimes omitted by educated 
speakers so that the second syllable becomes 


obscure-e in ‘“‘water." This is also standard 
usage in England. But the vowel] in this syl- 
jable is not necessarily sounded. It may be 
entirely shut out by the fore-closing of the 
final “n.” Mr. Bruning, Mr. Johnston and 
Claude King always give a syllabic-n as the 
last syllable to words of this order. The 
tongue goes directly from the spread-s posi- 
tion, or sh-sound, to the tip-tongue position of 
“n’ without making room for any vowel 
sound between. This is entirely consistent 
with the historical tendency of English to 
belittle unstressed syllables in the jnterest of 
making the language compact. The pronuncia- 
tions of these good actors, just named, have 
the advantage of compactness. This compact- 
ness of pronunciation by means of syllabic-n is 
typical of Rollo Young in ‘‘Madam Pierre’’ and 
of many of our careful speakers on the stage. 
Rollo Young, for instance, pronounces ‘“‘for- 
tune” with syliabic-n, making the last syl- 
lable ‘‘-tshn,”’ with no n-sound. 

This discussion of syllabic-n brings me to 
George Gaul’s pronunciation of ‘“‘garien’’ in 
the opening act of the Shaw cycle. Webster 
gives “garden” syllabic-n, “‘gard'n.” This is 
the first pronunciation 1 think of in connection 
with cultured speech. The public speaker or 
the singer might put a vowel (obscure-e) in 
the second syllable, but the conversationalist 
is not likely to do that. 


The Garrick Theater is a cozy little house, 
and the Garden of Eden on the stage was a 
cozy little spot with Adam and Eve talking 
under the shade of the tree of knowledge. I 
don’t see why Adam needed to assume any- 
thing but the most economical conversational 
pronunciation that he could find. To talk 


PUBLIC 


SPEECH 


Now that political oratory is in the throes of democracy and machine politics, and 


language has been thrown to the mercy of 


conditions we live in.—ED.: 


formlessness of today. 


theless 
who has probably done more than any man 


the peace-making. 


and his thoughts go to a kind of tune. On 


such unplumbed depths of bathos. 
unliterary. 
literate in the higher sense. 
spurned when it is safe to do so. 


the speaking habitual in a good provincial 


“‘Present-day conditions, then, are by no means favorable to great speaking. 
the politician who talks occasional literature is not extinct, 


one of the few who can sustain some sort of comparison with its representatives. 
tastes he is the least literary of the older statesmen. 
His ignorance amazed the Continental chiefs of State whom he met during the war and 
But he has a natural sense of form, tho not invariably of good fo-m, 


now that democratic education has become a case of education by hordes, the English 


the dogs in public speech. There are two 


institutions left to which we have a right to look for guidance and public example in 
this respect. We still have a right to look to the cuurch for the refinements of education, and 
we have a right to look to the actor for the refinements of artistic instinct. 

The following discussion of political oratory, by E, T. Raymond, emphasizes the 


“Modern oratory tends to be unliterary because it tends to be deficient in form. A 
modern speech is comparatively a thing of shreds and patches. .. . 

“Gladstone could often rise to a concentrated splendor of phrase that placed him, if 
not in the first rank of orators, at any rate very high in the second rank. 
habitually talked literature. Disraeli was a master of form, even tho it was often very 
bad form. But the specially literary quality of Victorian, as of Eighteenth-Century 
speaking, was equally exemplified in the rank and file. 
aller and now almost forgotten statesmen who did not build and shape his speech 
care men only bestow on things they feel are enormously important. 
might exhibit some sign of degeneration, but there was still style. 
tician was either so audacious or so slipshod as to adopt or fall into the comparative 


Lord Salisbury 


There was scarcely one of the 


The style 
No Victorian poli- 


Never- 
Mr. Lloyd George, 
to depress the old tradition, is yet himself 
In his 
He seldom reads and never writes. 


the other hand, he lacks the power of self- 


criticism, and if few living men rise so high there is none who can, on occasion, explore 


“The average Minister, and especially the Minister of the newer school, is not merely 
He is fiercely and contemptuously anti-literary, and, as a rule, not even 
Syntax he regards much as he does the old-fashioned con- 
stitutional rules still circumscribing his freedom—as something to be ignored always, and 
The general level of speaking in the House of Commons 
is lower than it ever was, lower than most County Council speaking, and far lower than 


debating society twenty years ago.""—From 


“THE LONDON MERCURY,” November, 1921. 


DOOFOFF-6-6-0-0-6-6-0-0-660F6 OFFS SSTOOHOOOOOOO SOOO OF0F006564, 


*“‘thoo.” In the United States, as I have stated, 
the third syllable takes an s-sound instead of 
@ z-sound. 

The variations in this word are that the 
first syllable may have the obscure-e, and 
sometimes the e-sound in “met.” As nearly 
as I could detect from a side seat, the Garrick 
company simplified the second syllable by 
making it ‘‘thoo’ and omitting the glide. 

The Garrick company is playing a British 
play. The pronunciations are as nearly inter- 
national as we could ask for, altho in some 
instances the British usage differs from our 
own. 

The Garrick company, for instance; pro- 
nounces the first syllable of “evolution” with 
the e-sound in ‘“‘eve.’’ This is the standard 
pronunciation usually heard in educated speech 
in England, and seldom heard in the United 
States. Our pronunciation, however, with the 
e-sound in ‘“‘met’’ is also heard jn England. 
Claude King and Moffat Johnston both gave 
the glide u-sound in the third syllable of this 
word. Cultured speakers will sometimes omit 
the glide in this word, making the third 
syllable ‘‘loo.”” The cultured speech of the 
theater tends to keep the glide-u in all words 
where it is standard. 

Words ending in “-ion,”” in the Garrick 
vocabulary, usually end in syllabic-n, for in- 
6tance, 

explanation, 
opposition, 
decision, 
federation. 

Webster gives to each of these words an 
obscure vowel sound in the last syllable, 
represented by “shun."* The vowel is the 


about “‘gar-dun” in that cozy atmosphere dis- 
tracted my attention. I had to stop to trans- 
late the word. Eve said “‘gard’n’’ with syl- 
labic-n, and so it seemed very early in the 
history of man, where there were only two 
persons on the face of the earth, to have two 
dialects under the tree of knowledge. 

I am constantly reminded of the fact that 
actors, and especially American actors, have 
no instinctive and no trained sensibility in 
their reactions on pronunciations. Perhaps 
the English-speaking stage has not yet arrived 
at a consciousness of language that makes the 
actor at all comparable with the musician in 
his feeling for sound and rhythm, 


Perhaps I was especially poised for sensitive 
feeling in this respect in the opening scene 
of the Shaw cycle. We were all breath ess 
to be ushered into the mystery of the tree 
of knowledge. When pronunciations were con- 
trasty, to borrow a term from photography, 
they were abjectionable to my ear, and they 
were out of the picture, which was full of 
harmony. 
such a case, but I do blame the condition 
on the English-speaking stage, which allows 
these things to go unchallenged by actors and 
unnoticed by directors. 

My points of contention may seem like hair- 
splitting absurdities, but my contention is 
that art is a hair-splitting refinement of sense. 
The stage requires refinement of sense in 
speech just as much as it does in scenic color, 
linea outline and facial expression. 

In the garden scene, Margaret Wycherly, as 
the voice of the snake, had a stunt to do 
that permitted her every license essential to 
producing a hissing voice and an audible speech, 


I do not blame individual actors in ® 


In a dialog between the snake and Eve, the 
word “‘second’’ was uttered by the shake and 
immediately repeated by Eve. 

Miss Wycherly intoned her words 
extent to give an eeriness to the se 
the word 


to some 
i rpent. Oa 
“second” she gave the o-sound in 
the second syllable considerable openness—the 
“o’ in “on.’” When Eve picked up the word 
she gave the conversational pronunciation, 
which shortened the secong Syllable and made 
the vowel the obscure-e in ‘“‘water.” Repetition 
hardly has the force of repetition if the pro- 
nunciation is noticeably changed from mouth 
to mouth. My feeling in this instance was to 
wish that Miss Wycherly had made her pro- 
nunciation approach more nearly the form that 
Miss Lascelles, as Eve, would most naturally 
use. Miss Wycherly is skillful artist enough 
to manage any pronunciation in the mouth of 
the serpent. 


There were three voices in the Garden of 
Eden. There was a separate pronunciation of 
“garden” for each voice. The serpent, in- 
toning words to some extent, used the strong 
form “‘gar-den."” Adam used the next weak 
form, which is something like “gar-dun,” and 
Eve used the conversational form 


“gard’n” 
with syllabie-n. This instance will at least 
illustrate my point. In picture design we 


aim to have unity, in color we aim to have 
harmony, in grammer we have something 
called concord, but in speech, we talk all 
over the place. 

It was doubtless just a momentary slip of 
the tongue that explains Miss Lascalles’ pro- 
nunciation of ‘‘nothing’ with an open sound, 
but as this pronunciation followed Miss 
Wycherly’s standard pronunciation of “‘noth- 
ing’’ with the u-sound in “up,”” it was con- 
trasty to hear Miss Lascalles lapse into a pro- 
nunciation with the o-sound in “on.” This, 
of course, is a pronunciation not ysed inten- 
tionally by careful speakers. 


The difference between ‘‘whisper’*® with the 
w-sound in ‘wit’? and ‘‘whisper’’ with the hw- 
sound in ‘‘who"’ is not very noticeable on the 
stage except to an attentive ear, but is worth 
noting in connection with discussions of stand- 
ard speech. 


The spelling ‘“‘wh’’ in the United States is 
usually given a combination hw-sound. This is 
a voiceless sound in contrast to the w-sound 
which is voiced. In Scotland, Ireland and the 
United States, the spelling “‘wh’’ is usually 
given the voiceless hw-pronunciation. In 
southern English, this spelling is usually given 
the pronunciation of voiced ‘‘w” in ‘‘wit,”’ ex- 
cept on the words “‘who,” ‘‘whose,’’ “whom” 
and “‘whole.” But usage of the “‘wh’’ spelling 
varies even in southern England, so that Eng- 
lish women of the South may be heard to give 
the voiceless hw-sound, whereas the men are 
more likely to use the sound of ‘‘w." 


In the Garden of Eden, Miss Wycherly, as 
the snake, pronounced ‘‘whisper’* with the hw- 
sound. Mr. Gaul, as Adam, used the w- 
sound. In the second cycle, I noticed that 
A. P. Kaye on the word ‘“‘why” used the 
‘weound, according to British usage, whereas 
in the United States we are prone to say 
“hwy.’* This particular sound is not important 
in our present stage of variation, but it is 
worth keeping in mind as a matter of record 
and observation. The actor needs to know 
everything about his language. 


L. J. K. HEIL says 


I've handled MADISON'S 
BUDGET, Mr. Madison's instructions to 
me have been: “If any purchaser is dis- 
satisfied with his bargain, give money 
back without question or argument.’’ As 
a@ matter of record, on the rare occasion 
when I am asked to return a dollar, it 
is only because the performer has ac- 
cidentally onlered the pame BUDGET 
twice. Get Mr. MADISON'S latest and 
greatest issune—MADISON'S BUDGET No 
18, which contains a profuse assortment 
of gilt-edge monologues, double acts, both 
for 2 males and male and female; parodies, 
200 single gags, some great minstre! first- 
parts with finale, a one-act comedy ‘‘tab."’ 
for 9 people, a sketch for 4 people and 
many other comedy et ceteras. emem 
ber ONE DOLLAR brings MADISON'S 
S BUDGET No. 18 to any address the worl’ 
over. Send orders to L. J, K. HEIL, 1052 
Third Avenue, New York. 


Eat Your Way To Health! 


Rejuvenation without ‘‘freak’’ surgery. Have 
rich blood, lower pressure, boundless energy, 
perfect digestion—youthfulness. Banish consti- 
ation. Lengthen zo life—be genuinely happy. 
SEND FOR FREE PROOF. 


BYRON TYLER, Food Specialist 


000 Gibraltar Bldg., Kansas City, Missouri. 


SHOES 


AND ALL OTHER SUPPLIES. 
Send for Free Illustrated Catalogue. 
Waas & SON 2°6 N. 8th St.. Philad 


500 TACK CARDS 22". Bi ipie 
$5.50: 500 Half-Sheets, $6.80, ete. Samples, ROD 
SHOW PRINTING CO., Weidman, Michigan 


If you see it In The Billboard, tell them so. 


&@ 


_ ; ‘ 7 ( | r 
"38 a — 
? rr ee RS TT a 
| Kero 
. / ; Yy Wy bys Z 
: Z EOE _—————— 3} 
' 
HH) 
| 
(i 
i 
‘i ee 
it 3 
i a ee 
it | 
a 
‘ er ED CE 
Ba) dit eS 
| i ee 
- 
uy . 
—_—— en 
| | 
| a. 
; | | ee 
| : 
ee 
‘ 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


STAGE FOLK HONORED 
By the Drama League of New York 


New York, March 6.—At the annual dinner 
of the New York Drama League, held at the 
Waldorf, New York, Sunday evening, March 5, 
the ten professional individuals who had at- 
tained the most noteworthy theatrical achieve- 
ments of the year were mentioned. These were 
Lee Simonson, for his stage settings in the 
Theater Guild productions, especially in “He 
Who Gets Slapped;’’ Eugene O'Neill, for his 
plays, “Anna Christie’’ and “The Straw; 
Pauline Lord, for her acting in ‘“‘Anna Christie;’* 
Eva La Gallienne, for her work in ‘“Lilliom;"* 
Thomas Wilfred, for his invention, the color 
organ; Allan Pollock, for his acting in “A Bill 
of Divorcement;"’ Gilbert Emory, author of ‘‘The 
Hero;’’ Augustin Duncan, for his work as a 
producer and actor; the Misses Alice and Irene 
Lewisohn, for their productions at the Neigh- 
borhood Playhouse, and Robert Edmond Jones, 
for his stage settings. 

Harry Quimby, toastmaster, called attention 
to the fact that the dinner also marked the 
172d anniversary of the first professional thea- 
ter in the United States on March 5, 1750, in 
a building on Nassau street. This first thea- 
ter had a seating capacity of 450, and when the 
“Ss. R. 0." sign was called into service it 
showed that $126.75 had been added to the 
treasury by that performance. The population 
of New York was then 7,000, 

A number of speeches were made by notables 
and many prominent people were present at 
the dinner. 


“THEORIA” HOLDS LUNCHEON 


New York, March 10.—The ‘‘Theoria’’ held its 
month'y luncheon and matinee in the North 
Bail Room of the Hotel Astor Wednesday. 
Three hundred and twenty members and their 
guests were present. Sam Livesey, the ‘‘vil- 
lian” of “Bull Dog Drummond”, was the guest 
of honor. Mr. Livesey delivered a short ,ddress 
and recited a poem, 

Mrs. Harold George Wood, president of the 
“Theoria’’, called upon the members for @ 
vote against State censorsh'p of plays, which, 
if passed, in her opinion, would mean the death 
of the drama. She asked the entire member- 
ship to stand behind the managers, adding 
that ‘‘Theor'a’’ stands for everything construet- 
ive and not destructive’. 

After a vote had been taken and carried unan- 
imousiy against State censorship the club ad- 
journed and attended the matinee of “Bull Dog 
Drummond”. After the matinee the “Bull Dog 
Drummond"’ company he'd a reception behind 
the ecenes for the ‘“‘Theoria”’. 


“TRUTH ABOUT BLAYDS” POETIC 

New York, March 13.—‘‘The Truth About 
Blayds,"" A. A. Milne’s newest play, which 
opens at the Booth Theater tomorrow night, 
is a story about the great English poet, Blayds. 
C. P. Heggie will play the title role, Alexandra 
Carlisle the role of Isobel, the poet’s daughter; 
Ferdinand Gottschalk, the poet's son-in-law sec- 
retary; Vane Featherston, his married daugh- 
ter; Leslie Howard and Frieda Inescort, the 
poet's grandchildren, while Gilbert Emery, 
author of “The Hero,” will portray the char- 
acter of A. L. Royce, a famous London art 
and literary critic. 

“The Truth About Blayds” is now running at 
the Globe Theater, London. 

The settings for the American production have 
been designed by Norman-Bel Geddes. 


GREGORY TO STAR SOON 
IN “A PAIR OF SIXES” 


Chicago, March 10.—Will H. Gregory is back 
in Chicago after producing “A Fair Co-Ed” 
for the students of Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege, in Lansing. He will stage two dramatic 
Productions for the students of Northwestern 
University and another play for one of the 
exclusive Evanston clubs, Mr. Gregory has 
Signed with the Redpath-Vawter Lyceum Bureau 
to produce and star in “A Pair of Sixes,"” which 
will have sixteen weeks on chautauqua time, 
beginning about June 1. 


$1,000 OFFERED FOR 
“LIFE OF CHRIST” POSTER 
———- = 


Pilgrimage Play Association, Inc., Los Ange- 
les, Cal., is offering a prize of $1,000 for the 
best poster to advertise the pilgrimage play, 
“Life of the Christ.” 

The third annual season of the play will, 
commence on July 10, in the Pilgrimage Thea- 
ter, situated in 3 mountain setting outside of 
Los Angeles, 

The poster contest closes March 31 and judging 
of the posters will be done on April 7. Further 
information may be obtained by addressing 
Pilgrimage Play Association, Los Angeles, Oal. 


STAGE RECORDS DESTROYED 


New York, March 9.—Word comes from Cam- 
bridge, Mass., that several boxes containing 
the extensive and valuable collection of dra- 
matic literature and works of art made by the 
late Evert Jansen Wendell and donated to 
Harvard University by his will have been 
destroyed by fire. 


While the loss is said to be only partial, the 


CABLES FROM LONDON TOWN 


Billboard Office, 18 Charing Cross Road, W. C. 2 


MARCH 11 


By “WESTCENT” 


DISTORTION OF EVIDENCE CHARGED 
IN PERFORMING ANIMALS HEARING 


Fat was in the fire in Committee Room 11, House of Commons, on March 
9, when Mr. Colvin, chairman of the select committee on performing animals, 
publicly protested at receiving a letter from Monte Bayly, of the Variety 
Artistes’ Federation, who wrote saying that members of the committee were 
wilfully distorting past evidence, and challenging questions by Captain Bowyer 
and Commander Kenworthy. Mr. Colvin said that the whole committee con- 
demned the following paragraphs in Bayly’s letter: “It is fully apparent to me 
and to my colleagues that distortion and exaggeration are being used to bolster 
up the case against performing animals, and I regret personally that a ‘selec- 
tion’ of witnesses is being made with a view to this end. I regret to have to 
write to any gentleman in so forcible a manner, but it is a national question 
and one of vital interest to my organization and to the entertainment industry 
generally. I protest strongly (we have been unofficially informed) that we are 
not allowed to put in the witness chair trainers and people who can speak 
with authority and personal knowledge of the subject under discussion. I am 
regretfully inclining to the opinion that certain interested parties do not desire 
the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.” 

Mr. Colvin stated that the speaker had declared the letter most improper, as 
it impugned the impartiality of the committee. Mr. Bayly was present, as 
usual, but was not called upon or allowed to reply. The cause of his letter to 
Mr. Colvin was that the latter had ruled that he would not call any more wit- 
nesses thru the Variety Artistes’ Federation, but wanted “independent” wit- 
nesses. The Variety Artistes’ Federation wanted those accused to be called, as 
trainers, exhibitors, ete. Nevertheless Bayly got the desired result, as he 
forced Mr. Colvin to call Reuben Castang, J. B. Cuthbert (horse beauty) and 
Fred Ginnett. Ginnett floored everybody, being on the witness stand for over 
an hour, his naive answers and confidential repartee causing roars of laughter. 

Sir Charles Hawtrey was to have been the cranks’ trump card, but he didn’t 
appear, so he is called for March 14. It looked as if Monte Bayly would have 
been detained in the clock tower had the speaker exercised his prerogative, but 
as Bayly will hit the whole thing up in the issue of The Performer of March 
15 it is possible some interesting happenings may yet take place. 


ERNIE SUES WILLIE 


Ernest Edelsten sued Willie Edelsten on March 6 for an accounting of cer- 
tain monies received by him in respect to “The Charm School” and “Mar- 
tinique.” For the purpose of producing these two plays Willie borrowed $2,500, 
which was payable in installments, and Willie also was to pay twelve and a 
half per cent of the net profits. Willie contended that there had not been any 
net profits, as the piece had been run at a loss at the Comedy Theater. Justice 
Peterson ruled that Ernest’s interpretation of the agreement was wrong and 
Willie’s right, so Ernest lost his claim. 


VAUDEARTISTES ASSENT FROM V. A. B. F. DINNER 


The V. A. B. F. dinner at the Cecil Hotel was remarkable by the absence 
of artists, both corporeally and financially. Of $6,000 donated, under $1,000 was 
subscribed by vaudeartists. Every trade journal has panned the vaudeartists 
for not supporting their own charity. 


REHEARSING “DECAMERON NIGHTS” 


Rehearsals started at Drury Lane, March 9, for “Decameron Nights,” which 
opens there about Easter. McLaughlin and Boyle Lawrence are the adapters. 
The cast includes Ellis Jeffries, Willette Kershaw, Gladys Ancrum, Hw. A. 
Saintsbury, Hugh Buckler, Reginald Crompton, Arthur Whitby and Cowley 
Wright. ; 

ATTRACTIONS CURRENT AND IN PROSPECT 

A. FE. W. Mason’s “Running Water” succeeds “Bull Dog Drummond” at 
Wyndham’s Theater April 5, with J. E. Vedrenne having Edna Best as leading 
lady. Vedrenne can only get this theater for four or five weeks. 

“The Bird of Paradise” closes at the Garrick Theater tonight. 

Cochran & Belasco present Seymour Hicks in “The Man in the Dress Suit” 
at the Garrick March 21, the same date as Arthur Bourchier in “The Love 
Match” at the Strand. 

Owing to prior contracts “The Faithful Heart” must vacate the Comedy 
Theater at the end of this month to permit Leon Lion to produce R. C, Carton’s 
light comedy, “Other People’s Worries,” with Miss Athens Seyler, C. M. Lowne, 
Herbert Ross, Arthur Phillips and Miss Coopton. 

The king and queen witnessed “The Bat” at the St, James Theater March 4. 

D. W. Griffith's “Orphans of the Storm” will begin an engagement at the 
Scala Theater March 23 for an indefinite run. The Scala has been recon- 
structed internally at a cost of over $50,000. . 


SIR JOHN HARE LEFT COMFORTABLE FORTUNE 
Sir John Hare left a fortune of over $150,000 to his wife absolutely. 
“MAYFAIR AND MONTMARTE” SCORES 


C. B. Cochran scored a home run with “Mayfair and Montmarte” at the 
Oxford Theater March 9, the critics using every available adjective of praise 
as to scenery, dresses, etc., but they complain that the comedy is non est. 
Delysia dominated the show, with a good foil in Lady Tree. Other leading 
spirits to the success of the play were Nellie Taylor, Mabel Green, Anita Elsom, 
Joyce Barbour, Tubby Edlin, A. W. Bascomb and Charles Brooks. As Mr. 
Cochran would say: “He’s got another persistent success.” 


LUGG ARBITRATOR BETWEEN N. A, T. E. AND E, T. U. 


Alfred Lugg, general secretary of the Actors’ Association, was mutually 
appointed to act as arbitrator in the dispute regarding the line of demarcation 
between the Electrical Trade Union and the National Association of Theatrical 
Employees, as to which union was the proper body to organize the cinema 
operators. Mr. Lugg decided that an irrefutable casc was made out by the 
N. A. T. E., and he declared to that effect, but gave « recommendation, which 
was not to be construed as a part of his decision, that tl.: N. A. T. E. should 
agree with the E. T. U. that the rate of pay for cinema operators shall never 
be lower than the local district rate paid electricians, and that the E. T. U. 
should be prepared to support the N. A. T. E. to establish and maintain this 


rate. 
MYSTIC CLAYTON IN LONDON 
The Mystic Clayton is now here seeking an opening to show his act. 


aa 
oS 


printing house or bindery where some of the 
items of the collection had been taken for re- 
binding. 


choicest items in Mr, Wendell’s collection are 

said to have been entirely destroyed. These 

choicest ftems were retained by Harvard and 

the remainder sold at public auction in the The Wendeli collection was enriched by old 

American Art Galleries, New York, some years playbills, antique and modern paintings and 

ago, prints of actors and dramatic events extending 
The fire is thought to have started in a back for many years. 


“Tust 


IRENE BORDINI 
Scores Another Success _ 


New York, March 13.—‘‘The French Doll,’* 
in which Irene Bordoni is playing at the Ly- 
ceum Theater, has just terminated its fourth 
week of what promises to be a long and sut- 
cessful engagement. 

“The French Doll’ follows a series of plays 
at the Lyceum that have made theatrical 
history. In four years the beautiful playhouse 
of Forty-fifth street has had but five plays. hav- 
ing in that period tenanted such productions as 
“Tiger Rose’’ and ‘“‘The Gold Diggers.’’ Each 
ran for a year or more and ‘‘The French Doll” 
gives every promise of being just as success- 
ful as its fortunate predecessors. E. Ray 
Goetz has given the play one of the most beau- 
tiful productions of the season and the com- 
pany consists of such prominent artists as 
Thurston Hall, Will Deming, Edna Hibbard, 
Edouard Durand, Adrienne d’Ambricourt, Eugene 
Borden, William Williams, Laura Lussier and 
others. 


“MOUNTAIN MAN” PRIZE 

‘New York, March 9.—The Shuberts have an- 
nounced the prize winners in the ‘‘Mountain 
Man’’ poster contest, which was inétituted 
several weeks ago by Charles L. Wagner, 
producer of the play, and which was closed 
March 8. 

The object of the contest was to secure 
Posters which would best express the spirit 
and atmosphere of the play. The first prize 
of $50 was awarded to Charies F. Stuart, 
2176 Bathgate avenue, the Bronx. Mr. Stuart's 
design represents Sidney Blackmer as “The 
Mountain Man,” with mountains and forests 
forming a picturesque background. In sweep, 
in harmony of line and color, in suggestion 
of the immensity of the open spaces of the 
Blue Ridge and its grasp of the fundamental 
nature of ‘“‘The Mountain Man” himself, it 
surpassed any of the forty-two designs eub- 
mitted. 

Honorable mention was accorded to Mfrs. 
Oliver M. Saylor, of 6 Jane street, New York; 
Eleanor T. Middleditch, 201 St. James Place, 
Brooklyn, and Paul Gosman, Paterson, N. J. 


VOODOO PLAY 
To Be Produced by Augustin Duncan 


New York, March 10.—Augustin Duncan ane 
mounces that he has accepted for early pro 
duction a new play in three acts by Mary 
Hoyt Wiborg, entitled ‘‘Taboo.” 

The play is described as a deep study of 
voodooistic tendencies in the modern Louisiana 
Negro and its results on their racial and in- 
dividual progress. 

Mr. Duncan says that the play will require 
an unusually large cast and that rehearsals will 
begin immediately. Its first presentation is 
scheduled tentatively for Tuesday, March 28, 
but the theater is as yet unnamed. 

The production of ‘‘Taboo’’ will not interfere 
with the indefinite run of Eugene O'Neill's “‘The 
First Man,"’ in which Mr. Duncan is appearing 
at the Neighborhood Playhouse. 


“JUST MARRIED” 


To Be Given in Paris 


—_ 

New York, March 9.—Jules Hurtig, producer 
in conjunction with the Messrs. Shubert, of 
Married,’”” now playing to capacity 
at the Nora Bayes Theater, ig 
ting for the production of the play 


rs have shown a great in- 
terest in the play, the action of which takes 
place on a steamship of the French line; and 
Mr. Hurtig has received many requests for 
the French rights of the farce. 

When “Just Married’ is produced in Paris, 
it will be the first American farce staged 
there since “Baby Mine."* 


’ “FIRST FIFTY YEARS” MAKES 
DEBUT 


New York, March 13.—‘‘The First Fifty 
Years,’’ by Henry Meyers, which had its tryout 
at Allentown, Pa., Friday evening, March 10, 
opened at the Princess Theater last night. 

Clare Eames and Tom Powers have the lead- 
ing roles, and the play is under the manage 
ment of Lorenz M. Mart and Irving S. Strouse, 
Rivington Platt is staging the production. 


LEAVES THEATER GUILD 


New York, March 10.—Lucy Huffaker, who has 
been the moving spirit behind the Theater 
Guild’s publicity, has heard the call of the 
family. She is resigning her post so that she 
will have more time to “‘manage’’ her husband, 
Edward Goodman. 


BENEFIT FOR LAWLOR 


New York, March 6.—Miss Alice Lawlor an- 
nounces that a benefit will be given for Charles 
B. Lawlor, author of “The Sidewalks of New 
York,’’ at the George M. Cohan Theater, Sun- 
day night, March 26. Mr. Lawlor was former- 
ly of the Chas. B, Lawlor and Daughters Com- — 


‘ 


‘ 


ts 
—s 
|= 
7 | 
= 
es ee ee 


> = 


The Bi 


: MARCH 18, 1922 


Wy Y 


WWM Wd 


IN HOUSES AND UNDER CANVAS 


(COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CINCINNATI OFFICES) 


WHAT MAKES STOCK SUC- 
CESSFUL 


By FRANK HAWKINS 

I can see nothing but the brightest future 
for the stock manager for the coming season 
if that manager will conduct hs business 
along legitimate and commercial lines the 
same as any othe: business. The stock game 
is a little world all to itself, as I term it. 
True, it is theatrica] business, but when you 
open a company of players in any city you 
must take many things into consideration if 
you are going to make your organization a 
financial success. We all know that the loca- 
tion is a big factor, but many towns that 
managers have avoided are the ones which I 
like to prove are stock towns if you go after 
them right. My view of the vis'ting star 
system is that it doesn’t pay. Select an all- 
star company. By that I mean balance your 
company well and give them all a chance. 
Outside of your leading people engage actors 
for general business. I have found in the 
several years of experience that if you cast 
your players to suit the certain play and not 
the actor the public will more readily pat- 
ronize your offerings. The selection of your 
players is a most finportant item. Next comes 
the picking of plays; and while I am mention- 
ing the plays !et me add that you will always 
win out in the end if you are careful to 
pick clean, wholesome bills that mother, father 
and the children can see, for stock is the 
family amusement. 

One of the very most important places in 
the building of a successful season is the front 
of the house. See that it is clean and bright. 
See that your treasurer and assistant are cour- 
teous to the ‘‘customers’’; see that the door- 
man, ushers and all your attaches are like- 
wise, If you go into a dry goods store and 
the clerk gives you some saucy or pert remark 
in answer to a question you're not going there 
very often to trade, are you? It's the same 
thing with the stock manager or the theater, 
You are selling amusement and the more 
courteous you are to your patrons the better 
they like it, and THEY COME BACK. But 
they go away a traveling advertisement for 
you, saying: ‘“‘What a fine fellow Manager 
Soandso is." After you get them in the 
theater see that they are given more than 
their money's worth and they will talk still 
more. But above all KEEP YOUR SHOW 
CLEAN at al) times. Gain your patrons’ con- 
fidence and hold it. Tighten the grip on that 
coniidence by always telling them the truth 
about your plays; never fool them, for then 
you will likely lose them. The manager must 
be an actor himself, not behind the footlights, 
but with his patrons. Be a good fellow, meet 
the people when they come in and ask them 
bow they liked the show when they go out. 
Get suggestions from your patrons for the 
betterment of the engagement, make them 
think you are there to please them. Wear 
a smile at all times, become active in com- 
munity affairs, for every friend you make you 
bring a new customer to your theater. Make 
them think you are one of the homefolks and 
your battle is won. This has been my policy 
ever s'nce I have been in the stock game and 
wen during depressing times I have always 
me out successful. Don’t wear out your 
elcome in any town, for the public in fickle 
that way. If you see that you have been there 
too long announce your farewel] before they 
get out of the habit and give them a rest. 
They will miss you after you're away for 
two or three months and “‘the homefolks’’ will 
be even more eager to give you a bearty wel- 
come on your re‘urn. 

I heartily recommend the above as a certain 
pol'cy for stock that will always bring any 
manager a winner. With the papers so full 
of publicity on “unclean productions,”’ I fore- 
see the greatest year stock has ever known 
for the manager who has built up a standard 
of giving the public clean shows. I stated 
once before the people are fickle. They have 
patronized those plays, but they are becoming 
sick and tired of unclean ones and are awaken- 
ing to the fact that THEY DON’T PAY IN 


. THE END. 
After you once get them keep them. Ad- 
vertise well and keep it up. IT PAYS TO 


ADVERTISE. Mr. Manager, make yourself 
popular with your public and your company, 
live and let live, and you will reap the 


golden harvest. 
TYPE POSTERS Show rrint'co. 


50} SOUTH DEARBORN STREET, CHICAGO, 


NEW YORKERS 


Commend Blaney Players’ Productions 
—Elmer J. Walters Heads York- 
ville Booster Week Committee 
New York, March 9.—The fourth year of the 
Blaney Players at the Yorkville Theater shows 
interest in the organization stil] at fever heat. 
Not less than two dozen letters each week are 
received from patrons complimenting the man- 
agement upon the merits of the stock com- 
pany and the manner in which productions are 
made. In New York City, where many of the 
stock patrons have seen original productions 
during the downtown runs, it is taken by the 
management as a creditable sign to receive 

these signed documents of commendation. 

“Potash and Perlmutter” has an excellent 
advance sale, this being the first production of 
the Montague Glass and Roi Cooper Magrue 
comedy in this section. Henry W. Savace's 
Astor Theater success, ‘‘Cornered,”’ in which 
Madge Kennedy scored upon her return to the 
stage after a long screen career, bids fair to 
play to capacity audiences, wh'le ‘“‘Very Good, 
Eddie," the underlined attraction, undoubtedly 
will do its share to maintain the business 
standard of this etock company. 


Manager Elmer J. Walters, thru his affilla- 
tions with the local Chamber of Commerce, is 
heading a Yorkville Booster Week Committee 
that is promoting a “‘live week in trade’’ dur- 
ing the Lenten season. New York newspaper 


@dvertising men have become interested in the 
movement, which is expected to draw many 
people to Yorkville from otber sections in 
New York City. 


JAMES P. BURTIS 


To Head Own Stock Company in 
Youngstown, O. 


Youngstown, 0., March 9.—James P. Bartis, 
who was with Col. Horne’s company at Idora 
Park last season, will head his own organiza- 
tion at the park theater this season. 

As leading man with the Keith Union Hill 
stock in New York this winter, Burtis had 
many opportunities to sign up versatile players 
ani close contracts for a list of comedies, 
dramas and melodramas. Marjorie Dow, char- 
acter actress, who has a wide circle of friends 
among Youngstown theatergoers, has been en- 
gaged and Bennett Fill will again be stage 
director. Larry Chambers will be assistant to 
Rex Billings, manager of the park. 


SAYLES PLAYERS ILL 


Akron, 0., March 8.—All performances of 
“Her Atonement,” by the Sayles Players, at 
Music Hall have been canceled for the week, 
it was announced Monday, because of the seri- 
ous illness of several members. The company 
is expected to reopen Monday, probably in 
the same bill. 


AND 


stock. 
GEO. J. KYLE, Bus. Rep. 


LISTEN, LIVE MANAGERS, DO YOU KNOW THAT 


MARGUERITE BRYANT 


Associate Players 


In Permanent Stock Are Breaking Records Everywhere? 

Now in Our 14th Week, Strand Theatre, Sharon, Pa. 
Wish to hear from houses having adequate stage for Scenic Productions. 
Prefer to lease, or will entertain any reasonable proposition. Pleased at 
all times to hear from people in all lines who can qualify in first-class 


Strand Theatre, Sharon, Pa. 


CHAS. KRAMER, Manager, 


WANTED ToKeepChildren 


A pleasant Country Home for children of theatrical people who are on the road and can’t take 


care and nourishment by retired nurse. 
mijes from Chicago, 35 miles from Indianapolis. 


Swings, Spring Water, pleasant surroundings, 
Rates: $ 


good school. 


172 
For particulars address 


25 per month. 


FRANCES E. JOHNSON, R. R. No. f, Box 17, Cloverdaie, Ind.... 


STOP 


DESM 


12 PEOPLE—12. 6 male, 6 female. 
parture im the Musical Comedy World. 
Drops and Settings. 


LOOK 
LIBERTY 


A’ 
FOR GOOD STOCK HOUSE, BOAT SHOW, PARK, TENT, OR ANYTHING THAT PAYS. 


NEW YORK ROOF GARDEN REVUE 


Old ideas abandoned. A positive innovation A superb de- 
Girls, Mirth, Melody and Dance. Beautiful Costumes. 
5 Vaudeville Acts, including the 4 Musical] Suttons, 


MANAGER N.Y. ROOF GARDEN REVUE, Carelina Hotel, 2846 Olive St., St. Louis, Me. 


LISTEN 
OND’S 


» Special 


AT LIBERTY MAY 30TH 


ART PAYNE’S NOVELTY PLAYERS 


Now playing Ha-wi-an Gardens, Louisville, Ky. Six men, Piano, Saxophone 
and Clarinet, Drums and Xylophone, Cornet, Trombone, Banjo. Snappy Dance 
Orchestra, with reputation. Prefer Summer Resort. 


Address 


ART PAYNE, Ha-wi-an Gardens. 


AT LIBERTY FOR STOCK OR FIRST-CLASS REP., WALTER DE LUNA AND LOUISE AD-DEL. 


WALTER—Experienced Comedian, but can play an 
and personality. An A-NO. 1 Director if required. 
LOUISE— Experienced Ingenue oer Second 


parts. Ability, wardrobe and personality. Height, 5 


cialties, We have four ‘trunks of first-class wardrobe. 
OSITIVELY 
LUNA, Hotel America, 145 W. 47th St., 


ABSCLUTELY GUARANTEED. 


is We P 
WALTER DE 


Business Woman. 


part cast for. 


Use all dialects. Capab) 
Height, apable. Ability 


5 ft, 6% in.; weizht 130 Ibs.; age, 30. 
Young, capable of playing a line of strong 
2 in.; weight, 120 Ibs. Five rood Double Spe- 
Piety of stock and rep. e lence. Our work 
DO NOT MISREPRESENT. Equity members, 
New York, N.Y. 


ft., 


Tent Shows! 


concert, double front door or reserves. Long 


At Liberty! 


Comedy Vande, Team, man and woman. Black and white face. Change for week. 


_Look! 


Lady, bits, 


lay 
experience; sober; reliable. One single novelty. 


ROBISONS, 241 West New York St., indfanapolis, indiana. 


AT LIBERTY 


WOMAN. for Leads and Second Business. MAN, for Comedy and Juventles. ous Double Spectaios, 


Paint Scmery. Both young, experienced, 


LESTER, 526 Adame Ave, €., Oetrolt, Michigan. 


—— 


HAZEL BURGESS PLAYERS 


Bid Admirers Farewell—Final P . 
ance eee cont of oo 
ght 


Nashville, Tenn., March 9.—The lobby of 
Orpheum Theater, before the doors opened = 
the last performance last Saturday night of 
the Hazel Burgess Players, resembled very 
much the opening night some forty weeks ago 
when the big stock organization made its 
initial bow before a S. R. 0. house. 

As the curtain rose on the first act a bush 
came over the audience only to break, out into 
a storm as the first character in “Jim's Giri" 
made her appearance. It was Mabel Page. 
For two or three minutes she was unable to go 
on with her lines. The applause had scarcely 
ceased when it broke out afresh at the en- 
trance of Walter Woodall and Charles Richie. 
It reached a great volume when Peggy Al- 
lenby, the dainty ingenue, and Russell Sage 
made their bow. John Lyons and Robert 
Armstrong were accorded a great welcome. 
The greatest of all applause came when Hazel 
Burgess and Jack Hayden made their entrance, 
It was indeed a most worthy ovation. 

Upon the termination of the second act 
each of the cast made short talks, in which 
all expressed appreciation of the many friends 
made during their stay. To top the climax 
Jack Hayden ended the ‘‘au revoir’ with “We 
Will Return; We Will Come Back Again,” 
and his singing was loudly encored. As the 
final notes d'ed away three ushers came down 
the long aisles with their arms piled high 
with many handsome flowers and other gifts. 
It all went to show that they were sorry to 
see them go. There were many wet eyes in 
the large audience when the last farewell was 
said. Nashville brought the Burgess company 
here. Had they had the support they should 
have had the players wou'd have had 
no thought of going elsewhere. The theater- 
goers of Nashville do not appreciate a good 
company when they get one. Like Rip Van 
Winkle the public is stil) sleeping. 

When the final curtain was rung down and 
as the large audience began filing out Stanley 
Whiting, manager of the Burgess Players, 
went about shaking hands and acknowledging 
greetings from each and every one, 


LOUISVILLE, KY,, 


To Have Two Stock Companies for 
Summer Seaso mpetition 
Promises To Be Keen 


Louisville, KEy., March 9.—Shuberts and 
Macauleys, the two first-class road houses here, 
ete both to have stock companies for the 
summer. The Stuart Walker Company, which 
bas played the past few summers in Indianapo- 
lis, will be at the Shubert and the Malcolm 
Fassett Company, which has played Albany, 
N. ¥., the past few summers, will open at 
Macauley’s Theater April 16. 

Both producers will contest the territory and 
they seem to be keen about playing the same 
attractions. Mr. Fassett will open with ‘‘Polly 
With a Past’’ and use the following during 
the season: “Civilian Clothes,"’ “‘The Acquit- 
tal,” “Paid in Full,” “The Broken Wing,” 
“The Ruined Lady,”” “The Fortune Hunter,” 
“Buddies,"’ ‘“‘Cal) the Doctor,’ “‘The Gypsy 
Trail,” “A Very Good Young Man,"’ “Three 
Live Ghosts,” ‘“‘The Hottentot,"" ‘“‘My Lady 
Friends,”’ “Wedding Bells” and ‘Main 
Street." Matinees will be on Tuesday, Thurs- 
day and Saturday. 

It is reported that the Dunbar Opera Com- 
pany will provide a repertoire of comic operas 
at Fontaine Ferry Park as it did last season. 
And s summer season of opera is rumored for 
the B. F. Keith Mary Anderson Theater. 


MOVEMENTS OF ACTORS 


Chicago, March 9.—Arthur Holman, etage <i- 
rector; Marjorie Foster, leading woman, and 
Byron Hawkins, stage manager, have closed 
with the National Players. Pearl Hazieton is 
the new leading woman and Fred W. Weat 
the new stage manager. 

Col. F. P. Horne will put a summer stock in 
Akron, 0. He had a stock in Idora Park, 
Youngstown, 0., for several seasons. 

J. M. Hodges will move his musical stock 
from Detroit to Norfolk, Va., opening March 


The stock in the Orpheum Theater, Ottawa, 
Can., closed Saturday night. 

Sherman Kelly reports a good business with 
his new stock in Pontiac, Mich. 


WINNIFRED ST. CLAIRE 
RETURNS TO HARTFORD 


Hartford, Conn., March 9.—Winnifred St. 
Claire, popular leading woman of the Poll 
Players, the stock company which held forth 
at the Palace Theater here last summer, will 
return to this city with a stock company to 
open March 13 at the same theater. Miss St. 
Claire, who was recently granted a divorce from 
her husband, Earl D. Sipe, in Trenton, N. J., 
will play opposite A. H. Van Buren, another 
stock favorite. Mr, Sipe was manager of bis 


wife's stock company in Trenton a few years 
ago. , 


&@ 


a 
ay 
40 Mn itboard a 
¥ LL 
ob Y YY MUYpuvug] Yh YY fj) WY Y y UY YYyywpgw@$yyp)) Yj) Ys Uff iY fl VW yy Yj Vy beeen 
q Y / Uf MY Y UY Y y YY ‘ Uy <A j UY YY, Wy WY, Yy YY Ny Wy Yy Yy q 
ay YY — Y i Y y Yy Y) Uf Y/y W YY GY a7 YY 
TY VAY, %) AU Uy D ~ Y Y Y YY Y fy 
; Yj, ime YY Yy be. } YY VAna AP Vj G YY ; - 
MMMMMM@M@M€é—eéaMtCeehsi Yi fy MUU PIMJtzs.: YY YY YY L@E@T MT MM@@H@— Xx} 
po a a 
fe 
| 
} Pe 
ia 
i es 
. a 
1 
1h 
at 
jh : 
At: 
aa 6 
| 
a 
a. 
ie 
ih es 
in 
i 
4 { 
I 
- } 
1 =: Pa Rita a aaa en me — = ie: 
ee a 
: | ME HER — 
i 
is 
i | 
. 
: i | 
——————E>—=—————>>>>_—_>_—_———_——— 
ee 
} 
i 
ee 
' ee 
am 
a 
. 
re 
SS nee a 
| ee ee ee 
——————— a ee 
: ] 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


BENEFIT NETS $5,000 
At Opening Night’s Performance of 


“Three Faces East” by West- 
chester Players 


Mt. Vernon, N. Y¥., March 9.—The machina- 
tions and ramifications of the German secret 
service are revealed this week at the Westchester 
Theater, where the Westchester Players are 
presenting “Three Faces East." The play lacks 
the timeliness it possessed during the world 
war, but it is still a corking melodrama. The 
Westchester Players do it justic, histrionically 
and scenically. Leslie Adams comes to the 
front with a splendid piece of acting as a man 
servant-spy in the house of Minister George 
Bennett, and Lillian Desmonde is excellent as 
the mysterious girl in the same house. Charles 
Steffers, a newcomer, puts over a character hit 
in the role of Kugler. His enunciation is 
particularly to be commended. Miss Scott fig- 
ures rather prominently as a stenographer and 
private secretary, and Lawrence O’Brien is a 
dignified cabinet minister, Frank Day and Ted 
Le Duc play important roles, and the remainder 
of the company work hard in minor parts. The 
settings are tip-top and the costumes almost 
perfect. A notable feature of the presentation 
is the attention which has been given to the 
small points, both in action and production. 
Monday night’s performance, which was for 
the benefit of the Jewish Relief Fund, netted 
about $5,000, seats being sold at $5 and $10. 
Director Harry Jackson made a neat speech in 
which he expressed the players’ appreciation of 
the honor that had been accorded them in select- 
ing the Westchester for the benefit. 


“THE WOMAN OF BRONZE” 
PLAYING IN THE VICTORIA 


Chicago, March 14.—Frank A. P, Gazzolo’s 
Victoria Players are putting on ‘“‘The Woman 
of Bronze’ this week in the Victoria Theater. 
Only four weeks ago Margaret Anglin was star- 
ring in this play in the Princess Theater, which 
makes Mr. Gazzolo’s presentation about the 
last thing in late releases. ‘‘Scrambled Wives’’ 
was the offering last week. 


STOCK DURING WEEK; 
PI CTURES ON SUNDAY 


Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 2 March 9.—Beginning 
March 12, motion pictures will be presented at 
the Westchester Theater on Sundays. The 
Westchester Players will continue their stock 
productions under the management of B. L. 
Feirblatt as heretofore, but the house has 
been rented for Sundays to M. Cashin. 


IN OLD KENTUCKY 

This play can be secured for production under can- 
vas or on the road. Its Jong record of 27 consecutive 
seasons, its famous pickaninny band, the great horse 
race and other spectacular features make it a sure 
money-getter. It can also be secured as a thirty- 
minute tabloid for variety theatres, and requires only 
6 people besides the band. In Old Kentucky is fully 
copyrighted. Pirates will be rigorously prosecu 
Ack lress 
CHARLES T. DAZEY, Lambs’ Club, New York, N. Y. 


WANTED 


ORGANIST 


With knowledge of Hil Mareen Lane organ, for h 

fo Mardis wooden GO manera Bat eae OF 
e udev 

THEATRES, 719 National cite Bidg., Cleveland, 0. 


WANTED—AN OPERATOR 


‘who has his own Picture Machine and Reels, for three- 
night and week stands, one who can also show by 
GAS. Also a LADY as partner, for Sketches in 
Vaudeville, and other useful people write. JACK 
STARATTO, 95 16th Ave., Paterson, New Jersey. 


Laby BUSICIANS WANTED—PFor coming chautau- 

Season. iniste and Cellist. The Violiniste 
must also play. Piano. Address D, C, L., care Bill- 
oard, Cincinnati, 


WANTED—EXPERT PIANO LEADER 


with library that can play Vaudevil Pictu 
GEM THEATRE, Cairo Th ee ae wrens 


AT LIBERTY 


Beckley’s All American Concert Band 


Any size Band from 12 men up. Will consider any 
food, steady management, Address Glenn Beckley, 
Conductor, Salisbury, Md. Perm. add., Marion, Ohio. 


YOUNG DANISH ACTOR 


Production or Stock Compan 
Billboard, Chicago, Tlihols, 


Spe — x 5 Eng- 
lish, to join 
Address Kk. “on care 


a) LIBERTY—A-1 Violinist, experienced in Vaude- 
Ville and Pictures. Excellent Ubrary. Reference ex- 
changed, Baton Leader or Side Man, Nothing but 
rst-class theatres considered, Address VIOLINIST. 
il Hollywood St.. Worcester Massachn 
AT LIBERTY—A-1 Trombonist: 
pe rieneed_in_ all lines. 

Uper, 
Michigs 


a wane; Pou one = 
ansportation es, no 
a" Weinzaepfel, 157 Pasadena Ave., Detroit, 


eal LIBERTY—A-1 CLARINETIST 
Be ble y4 + experienced Vaudeville, Picture, Concert 
a (Solo Clar.). and Dance Orch. Great rep ‘a- 

om a8 reed instrument teacher and wood instrument 


Tepalr man. Ad 
Cin Cinetnnatt. ons BOX D138, care The Billboard, 


SCENERY 


Mamond ou w Colors. 
SCHELL SCENIC STUDIO. COLUMBUS, OHIo. 


COOPER STOCK COMPANY 


Scores in “Common Clay’—Run in 
Niagara Falls To Probably Continue 
Until July 


Niagara Falls, N, Y., March 9.—The Cooper 
Stock Company, now in its tenth week at the 
International Theater, scored another tre- 
mendous hit last week in “Common Clay.” 
Tho it was the first week in Lent, the entire 
house was sold out a week in advance and 
the management found it necessary to play an 
extra matinee to accommodate the hundreds 
who where turned away at the night per- 
formance. On Monday night a party of 300 
from the Shredded Wheat Company's plant 
attended the theater in a body, and to say they 
Were appreciative wou'd be putting it mildly. 

Maude Duvall, leading lady, was seen in 
the part of Ellen Neal. This little Miss, al- 
tho only 20 years of age, simply walked away 
with the show and the local critics and press 
have been very liberal in their praise of her 
work. Frank L. Root, in the part of Arthur 
Coakley, was pleasing as usual. A clever bit 
of acting was done by Alice Collisson in the 
part of Mrs. Neal, altho only in one act she 
made the part stand out admirably. Percy 
Bolinger, as Edwards, was as English as 
King George h'mself, and his dialect was per- 
fect. Bessie Sheldon, while only in the first 
act, played Mrs. Fullerton very natural. Ed- 
ward MacArthur played Hugh Fullerton and, 
tho handicapped by a bad cold, did very well, 
E. D. MacMillan, in the part of Richard Ful- 
lerton, was very convincing, particularly in the 
eecond act. Nadene Pauley was very pretty as 
Anne Fullerton, Harry Rankin, as Yates, oS 
Hi. Cooper, as Judge Filson, shared even OTs 
in two distinctly different types of lawyers. 
Others in the cast were: Edna Weeden, George 
Lennox, William Calhoun, Johnny Morgan and 
Thomas Connors, all of whom deserve special 
mention in small parts. 

Mr. Cooper recently installed a rea) lobby 
display in the theater foyer in the shape of a 
life-size photo of each member of the com- 
pany, mounted in Oriental frames and drapes, 
with the name of each member in brass plates. 


GORDINIER PLAYERS 


Putting It Over in Ft. Dodge, la. 


Ft. Dodge, Ia., March 9.—‘‘Broadway p'ars."’ 
by an excellent cast, is proving to be a big 
drawing card at the Princess Theater, where 
the Gordinier Players are in their fourteenth 
week. All the latest releases are played, with 
special scenery being built and puinted for 
every change. Capacity business et almost 
every performance and big regular reservation 
list indicate that the company will be here 
for several] more weeks. 

Mento A. Everitts and S. 0. Gordinier are 
being featured, supported by an A-1 cast. 
John Caylor is director and much credit is due 
Mr. Caylor for the success of this company. 
The cast is 100 per cent Equity. 


EVELYN HAMBLY JOINS 
WOODWARD PLAYERS 


Spokane, Wash., March 9.—Evelyn Hambly, 
former leading woman of the Alcazar Stock 
Company, San Francisco, made her debut in 
this city Sunday night as the new leading lady 
of the Woodward Players. The engagement of 
Miss Hambly, who is heralded as coming di- 
rect from a Broadway engagement in ‘Her 
Salary Man” at the Cort Theater, is the first 
step to be taken by 0. D. Woodward in build- 
ing up the somewhat shattered organization he 
left behind when he took some of his stock 
players to open the Seattle house. The Wond- 
ward Players are presenting “Cappy Ricks” 
this week. 


STOCK PLAYERS WORKING 
ON CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 


Salt Lake City, March 9.—The members of 
the former Wilkes Stock Company, which was 
closed a few weeks ago by Thomas Wilkes, 
have leased the theater and are at present 
operating on the co-operative plan. The plan 
was conceived by Iva Sheppard, the popular 
leading woman, and aid'ng her in the suc- 
cessful carrying out of the idea is Lyle Chilson, 
leading man and husband of Miss Sheppard. 


CASEY PLAYERS IN 
“PEG O’ MY HEART” 


New Castle, Pa., March 9.—The Tom Casey 
Players this week are presenting with a very 
capable cast “Peg o’' My Heart."" The role 
of Peg is being done admirably by Mildred 
Jerome. Mr. Casey made extra efforts to 
elaborate on the staging of the piece. Attend- 
ance continues good. 


NEW STOCK COMPANY 
OPENS IN BROOKLYN 


Brooklyn, N. Y., March 9.—“Common Clay” 
served to introduce to local theatergoers the 
Todd Players, a new stock company. Laura 
Walker is leading lady, supported by Henry 
Mowbray, Ann Carpenter, Clyde Franklin and 
others. 


CLARA JOEL 


To Head Cast of New Atlanta (Ga.) 
Stock Company—William Boyd 
To Play Opposite Her 


Atlanta, Ga., March 9.—According to Dan 
Michaelove, director of theaters for Southern 
Entenprises, Clara Joel and William Boyd have 
been engaged as the leading people of the stock 
company which will open at the Forsyth Theater 
here March 20 for a season of permanent 
stock. Rehearsals will begin March 13, The 
Forsyth will be completely renovated and re- 


arranged. ‘‘Adam and Eva” will be the initial 
offering. 
Walter §. Baldwin, managing director of 


the company, is one of the oldest and most suc- 
cessful stock managers in this country, and he 
is brimful of enthusiasm over his Atlanta ven- 
ture. In the old days of repertoire road com- 
prnies of a quarter of a century ago he oper- 
aed the Baldwin-Melville troupe. Later he 
opened a stock company in New Orleans. 

The supporting cast will include Kathryn 
Givney, formerly with the Morosco Stock Com- 
pany; Robert Craig, juvenile; Mary Tarry, in- 
genue; Alice Baker, characters; Arthur Byron, 
comedian; William Melville, Stuart Beebe and 
Frank Munnelle. 


“WITHIN N THE LAW” 


Is Capital Vehicle for for Woodward Play- 
ers—Open To Capacity Audience . 


Detroit, March 8.—‘‘Within the Law’ proved 
& capital vehicle for the Woodward Players’ 
eighth week at Majestic Theater, epening to 

a capacity audience Sunday night, March 5. 

The leading role, Mary Turner, was en- 
trusted to Frances Carson, whose characteriza- 
tion of the shop girl railroaded to prison on a 
fluke was admirably done and bore further evi- 
dence of her versatility. Miss Carson actually 
thrilled her audience in the tense scenes to a 
point where the outbursts of applause were 
deafening. Walter Davis shared honors with 
Miss Carson as the rich man’s son, in love 
with her. Diantha Pattison gave a splendid 
reading of the role of Agnes Lynch, a con- 
fidence woman. Robert Strange, as Joe Carson, 
the forger, and J. Arthur Young as the 
police inspector gave a praiseworthy account 
of themselves. D'rector Cyri] Raymond, cast 
for the part of Edward Gilder, proprietor of 
the Emporium, was well received by the big 
audience. All parts in the play without ex- 
ception were well taken and called into service 
practically every player of the Woodward 
roster, 

“Nightie Night’ will be the bil) for the 
week commencing next Sunday night. 


ORPHEUM PLAYERS, OTTAWA, 


IN “THREE LIVE GHOSTS” 

Ottawa, Can., March 11.—‘Three Live 
Ghosts’’ was the play chosen by the Orpheum 
Players at the Family Theater this week. The 
rendition of this play is far in advance of the 
majority of the pieces given by the players 
this season. 

The plot gave forth many humorous situa- 
tions and the acting was viewed by the different 
audiences with keen enjoyment. The presenta- 
tion was somewhat marred by an imperfect ren- 
dering of the cockney accent, but the otherwise 
splendid acting of the company amply out- 
shone this. Mae Melvin as Mrs. Gubbins, acted 
the part with eminent success. Herbert De- 
Guerre gave one of the best bits of acting 
during his association with the players. His 
work all thru was very worthy. William 
Courneen, leads, maintained his evident pop- 
ularity with the public and contributed nice 
work in his character; William Foster and 
James Swift interpreted their parts in true-to- 
life style, while the other members of the 
company kept up to their usual standard. MHar- 
old Hevia, owner of the Orpheum Players, Mon- 
treal and Ottawa, announces this as his last 
week of stock in Ottawa, after having pre- 
sented nigh onto twenty-five bills of one week 
each. 


MARGARET KNIGHT GIVEN 
BIG WELCOME IN MONTREAL 


Montreal, March 8.—A rousing reception was 
tendered Margaret Knight upon her return as 
leading lady of the Orphenm Players Monday 
nighte Several minutes elapsed before the per- 
formance of “‘The Lion and the Mouse”? could 
continue, so great did the patrons show their 
sincere and keen pleasure in having her re- 
turn after too long an absence. To say the 
least, “The Lion and the Mouse” was artistic- 
ally presented by the Orpheum Players. 


JOSEPH H. SLATER TO 
MANAGE STOCK COMPANY 


Watertown, N. Y., March 11.—Joseph H. 
Slater, of this city, has taken a position with 
a stock company at York, Pa., and has left 
to take up his new work. In addition to 
managing the company he will also play parts. 


The Phil Maher Players, which closed their 
stock engagement at the Strand Theater in 
Pittsburg February 25, are now playing a few 
weeks of repertoire. 


ra ieee 


JACK MILLS, Inc. : 
MUSIC PUBLISHERS ~ 
152 West 45th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 


a 


SUGGESTS 98 


“DEAK 
SOUTHLAND 


= Singers, Quartets, Chautau- 
qua Artists, Orchestras, Etc. 


oe. ew ea 


~~ 
° 
be 
< 
— 
c 
Qa 
© 
s 
o 
o 
3 
Qa 
ce) 
° 
3 
® 
a 


{Hi AUO NANNING Leen vUNTAMANNALaNNENp 


ANY MATERIAL 
YOU MAY DESIRE 
FOR THIS PURPOSE — 
WILL BE SENT 
ON REQUEST. — 


> 


incvavecennusuaninuannacueniane 


PTTL 


NORTH EAST BUNGALOW SHOP 
EXCLUSIVE 


LADIES’ AND GENTLEMEN’S HIGH-CLASS 
mw... GARMENTS. we 

Street and ming Wear. Evening Gowns, Ful 

Dress Suits, Tuxedos, Fine Furs, Hats an d Shoes. 


138 $. Oakley Ave. Kansas City, Mo. 


MRS. ROY C. TRITLE, Phene: Benton 1996, 


SHOW PRINTING 


AT LIBERTY 


Martgare-—G RIF FI TH—Jack 


MARGARET—General Business, Les Ingenues, 
Eccentric Characters, No dialect parts. 5 ft. 6 m.2 
120 lbs.; 26 years. JACK—Leads, Heavies, Charac- 


ters, Comedy. Stage Director with rea] scripts, 5 ft. 
11 in; 160 Ibs. years. 4 Double Specialties, 6 


Singles. Address Jack Griffith, Peiahatchee, Miss. 
Minstrel. GUTS =: I Dodeers 
for Hera'ds. Cards. 

1000 proof shts, 25 Refunded ine 
CENTRAL SHOW PRINTING CO., Mason City, lowa. 
New Price List just ne. Saves you money. Get 

B TODAY. 
CURTISS. - - Continental, Ohio. 


LIBERTY IONA JACOBS “nee 


REP. 


CHARAC S—Grand Re Heavies. Versatile, 
All essentials, wardrobe, appearance. ability, etc. 
Guaranteed ren Heavy orchestra and Specialty Pi- 


@niste. Specialties. Height, 5 ft.. 7 in.: weight, 145. 
Equity. Absolutely reliable amd experianced. Address 
Hotel Emmet, 273 W. 38th, New York City. 


2 81 6 WANTED—1 922 


Co Salary low. hose who wrote before 
ay dione ROLLING. THUNDER, Lamertine 
(Clarion Co.), Pa. 


A Few Better- Class Plays £2" for Stock and Rep. 


CENTRAL PLAY co.” “*%" 
2043 Buchanan, Mich, 


Grand Rapids, 
WANTED—Good Comedian, one with good loud wice 
and quick action, for talking pictures. Good encage- 


ment for the right mam. No war salary. A. HAM- 

MERLY, Igric Theatre, Hamilton, Ohio. Hello, 

Happy _Bi'l. TASS + 
WANTED, MEDICINE PERFORMERS q 

Change for week. State very lowest and all you do 

in first letter. Two tent shows. Open April 20 and 


7. Eat amd sleep in tents. Travel by trucks. Want “ 
™an and wife to do the cooking. 

Pay each week. M. MI 
Perry Co., 


No fancy salaries, 
LLER, Landisburg. 
Pennsylvania. 


. Wented Modis Medicine People At Once , 
tate a Lecturer. DOC BAKER, Cadillac, ‘J 
Michigan. ® { 


+ 


eee eee ao a 
eee 

Ss | 

a | 

| 

& 

Ps : i 

ee E =} 

— | 

Ss ee | 

i] 

pT = e 

| 

pS _ 7 

ee ee ee | 

— Li 

| i2 


P “rus oe 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


BOAT SHOWS - CHAUTAUQUA DRAMATIC COMPANIES 


“TOM SHOWS AND TENT VAU DEVILLE 


(COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CINCINNATI OFFICES) 


What “Rep” Audiences Want 


By HERSCHELL WEISS 


In a recent issue of The Billboard there ap- 
peared an article, under the caption of ‘Does 
the Shoe Fit,"" which dwelt upon the kind of 
plays the average repertoire audiences like, 
And, their likes are not greatly different from 
their more fortunate city cousins. Cleanliness 
and morality are just as essential, perhaps more 
s0, in the ‘‘sticks’’ than on Broadway. Broad- 
Way wanis excitement; the small-town audiences 
want clean entertainment, but they would like 
to have it served in a palatable manner, with 
characters as well as the show dressed some- 
where near in keeping with the plot. No rep- 
ertoire audience expects a repertoire company 
to give a Broadway production of each play it 
offers, but they do expect a play to be 
“@ressed’’ in keeping with the story. How 
many “‘rep.’’ managers give a serious thought 
to the way their actors dress their parts, to 
say nothing of the way the show is dressed? 
An actor in a walking suit, with low-cut run- 
over-at-the-heel shoes, a soft pink collar and a 
green tie would have a better chance of con- 
vincing a Broadway audience that he was a 
“gentleman of means’’ than he could a rural 
audience. That also holds good with the actress 
who comes on with rosy cheeks, blood red lips, 
silk stockings (her dress may be ragged) and 
tries to convince the audience that she is 
“starving’’ and alone in the world. It can’t 
be ‘‘did.” 

The manager that pays a fair salary to his 
actors has a right to demand that they dress 
their parts in keeping with the characters, but 
who has the right to demand the manager to 
dress the show in keeping with the plot? The 
patrons have that right, and if they are not 
demanding their rights as yet, they will. 

It is an undisputed fact that very few rep- 
ertoire shows could carry a carload of flats, 
but the smallest of shows could easily carry a 
trunk or two of tack stuff, and while perhaps 
not as effective as the flats, it would at least 
be something new and away from the old house 
etuff that has been used by every “‘troupe”’ since 
the Opera Hall was built. It is rather hard 
for the wealthy hero to bring his bride into 
the “‘palatial’’ home of his proud and haughty 
parents, when the effect of this beautiful home 
is made up with a bunch of old warped scenery, 
with the canvas slashed and the paint knocked 
off until it is impossible to figure out whether 
the original color scheme represented a sun- 
set in the Rockies or a storm on the Atlantic. 
And, when when the beautiful maiden is driven 
out into the zero weather (how she shivers) 
and there is the same old wood drop, so green 
and beflowered (that is green and beflowered 
where the paint stayed on) as it was in the sec- 
ond act when it backed up a lawn party. Once 
more, it can’t be ‘‘did.”’ 

Personality and ‘mixing’ are big assets in 

the show as well as in all lines of business, but 
giving value is the real asset after all. For 
example, Billy Smith has a restaurant, he is a 
good fellow and good mixer, but he sets a poor 
table. John Doe also has a restaurant, he is 
not a good mixer, but he sets a GOOD table. 
Which one will get the business, and which one 
will go broke? 
An actor or actress thru their personality and 
heir power to read lines can make an and'ence 
forget that they are not personally attractive 
or handsome, but a set of scenery—never. The 
shabbier it looks the shabbier it is and that in 
time would kill any show, 


ED. WILLIAMS TO PLAY 
PRELIMINARY SEASON 


The Ed Williams Stock Company of eleven 
people opens its preliminary tent season in the 
houses at New Athens, Ill., March 22. In the 
cast will be Francis X. Moore, leading man; 
Charley Clifford, of Clifford and Clifford; How- 
ard Vail, of Vail and Vail; Ed Williams, Wini- 
fred Wilde, Margaret Vail and Catherine Clif- 
ford. 

The repertoire embraces a fine list of plays. 
The opening play, ‘“‘Mickey,”’ is from the pen 
of Mr. Moore. The company as a whole is said 
to be well balanced. Vaudeville will be offered 
between the acts. 


HANLON’S TRIP CALLED OFF 


The Western trip contemplated by Tom Han- 
lon, traveling representative of the Actors’ 
Equity Association, bas been postponed for a 
few weeks. 


NUTT SHOW HEADED NORTH 


After a winter season spent in Texas the Ed 
C. Nutt Comedy Company is on its way North 
to play in old territory in Arkansas, Louisiana, 
Mississippi and Alabama. While business has 
been very poor at times the winter season as a 
whole will show a balance on the right side. 


The members make the jumps in their own 
cars and many pleasant Sundays are spent fish- 
ing and hunting along the way. Several changes 
have been made in the campany. Fred Ham- 
ilton has been compelled by poor health to give 
up advance work. Wayne Kirk has taken his 
place and has shown that he can post as well 
as act, the Monday openings proving the result 
of his hustling. Hazel Brown spent the Christ- 
mas holidays at her home in Cleveland, re- 
joining the company in Kingsville, Tex. The 
band, under the able direction of “Bill” 
Schwalb, consists of Hal Burwell, Chas, Munro, 
Stace Fletcher, Jack Rainwater, Al Knipe, Dave 


Jakes, Wm. Shawn, Dan Schwalb and Manager 
Sedgwick. 


The acting personnel includes Roland Sedg- 
wick and wife, Howard and Hazel Brown, Bill 
and Lottie Chagnon, Grace Hamilton, Chas. 
Munro, Miriam Schwalb and Prof. Knipe. 


BRANDOM BROS. SHOW 


This has been the most curious of seasons 
for the Brandom Show, which is reported to 
have toured Missouri the past winter to a very 
ordinary business. It ‘s the lament of the con- 
tributor that there was no euch thing as a 
“road”’ business this year, but ‘n comparing 
the rece'pts taken in with those of several 
other ebows Brandom Brothers not alone suf- 
fered meager attendances. The company will 
soon open its tent season. 


NECK CHAINS, Large Dolls, 


Bracelets, FINE CLUTCH PENCILS, Gold 


BOOKS, PIPES, Silk Handkerchiefs, 
the usual prize package now offe ed. 


cessionaires. 
customers the highest satisfaction. 


100 per cent. 
Try 


at $10.40 a case, of 250 
Regular Stock. 


have our prompt attention. 


On account of these BIG PRESENTS showing up in nearly every other package, 
SURPRISE SWEETS DE LUXE is the most TREMENDOUS SELLER ever offered to Con- 
Also on account of the great number of FINE PRESENTS you give your 


If you wish you can flash every third box, 
1,000 sales instead of 500 to the same sized crowd. 


The price of this Candy is only $12.50 a case of 250 
boxes. This price is F. 0. B. Cleveland, Ohio. Sells for 10c a box and 


one case of this Candy and you will use no other. 


Ask For Surprise Sweets De Luxe 


Please note that we can also supply you with our regular case of SURPRISE SWEETS 
boxes, including 25 Good Ballys and many good presents in 


Order from this ad. or write and let us give you further particulars, 


KOHLER PLAYERS CLOSE 
IN BARBERTON, O. 


The Kohler Associated Players closed in Bar- 
berton, O., March 11 on account of the sudden 
death of Frank Hathaway, one of the members, 
Mr. Hathaway was taken ill with sleeping sick- 
ness March 2 at Mineral City, O., and before 
the company moved from there to its next stand 
the members engaged a nurse and arranged for 
proper medical attention. It is said Mr. Hatha- 
way left Mineral City at 5 o'clock the next 
morning in scant attire for Akron, where he 
was accosted by the station agent, who, realiz- 
ing the poor state of healih he was in placed 
him in a sanitarium, where he died March 9 
at 2:30 p.m. His wife, who was playing in Bar- 
berton, O., with the Kohler Players, was advived 
by the station agent of his presence in Akron 
and she arrived in time to be with him a few 
hours before death came. 


BOBBY LaRUE PLAYERS 
MAKE RECORD, IS REPORT 


-—_—— 

The Bobby LaRue Players entered into their 
twenty-first week of circle stock in and around 
Indianapolis, March 6, which is considered a 
record in that locality for a company of that 
caliber, and in spite of the Lenten season bus- 
fness is holding up wonderfully well. Mr. La- 
Rue has purchased a tent and will play Indiana 
territory, opening the latter part of April. 
A few changes have been made in the personnel. 
Mr. Buhler was summoned suddenly to New 
York on account of the death of his sister, and 
he was replaced by Tommy Coyle. Mittie 
Ezell left Saturday night, March 11, for her 
home in Texas, and Emma May Taylor Las 
been engaged as the new leadjng lady. Miss 
Taylor just closed with the Jack King Co- 
medians. 


SS ae ee wa a 
PMU 


TO CONCESSIONAIRES 


OF MOTION PICTURE HOUSES, THEATRES, TENT SHOWS, 
GRAND STANDS AND ALL OTHERS WHO HANDLE 


Prize Candy Packages 


Gentlemen—Have you ever handled a bally seller and found that the “regular stock” 
contained a great many useless and worthless articles? It is with the intention of at 
least partly overcoming this defect that we are now offering our 


SURPRISE SWEETS DE LUXE 


which has lately been outselling, five to one, any similar package. The reasons for this 
are that the Candy is good, the box showy, and because there are TWO ESPECIALLY 
FINE PRESENTS in every five packages, such as WATCHES, LADIES’ SILK HOSE, Soft 
Cuff Links, SAFETY RAZORS, Gold-plated Cuff Links, VANITY CASES, Snap Cuff Links, 
Men’s Handkerchiefs, NIFTY CIGARETTE CASES, Gold Bead Necklaces, LAVALLIERE 
MEN’S HOSE, 
Small Bottles of Perfume, MEN'S PELTS WITH SILVER FINISH BUCKLES, Gold-plated 
and Silver-plated Stone-Set Rings, 
CHAINS, Ladies’ Powder Puffs, SILTERWARE, Gold-plated Brooches of every descvip- 
tion, GOLD-PLATED KNIVES, Tie Clasps, SILK WATCH FOBS, GOLD-PLATED COLLAR 
BUTTON SETS, PILLOW TOPS, Arm Bands, MEN'S NUCKWEAR, Note Books, BILL 
White Stone Jewelry of dazzling brilliancy, and 

many other articles of real valve ard merit, 
one hundred EXTRA GOOD PRESENTS and 150 boxes of regular stock, such as found in 


LARGE GIFT BOTTLES OF PERFUME, 


WATCH 


In a word, each case of 250 boxes contains 


It means 


thousand 
you about 


boxes, or $50.00 a 
nets 


Wired orders 


SHOW PEOPLES CANDY CO. 


603 West Superior Avenue, 


Cleveland, Ohio 


QULUAUERD DEA DECUSECUERUEEETEUEEEU ES SEOUTEE TEE EEE TEETER ETRE SEPA EE AEE E TERRE E EEE EERE EERE = 


‘ 


LaROY STOCK COMPANY 


To Take Road in May—T 
Convey Outfit, Sena 


Much activity prevails at the winter quar. 
ters in Fostoria, 0., of the LaRoy Stock Com- 
pany, and according to Marie Hayes LaRoy, 
owner and manager, everything wil be brand 
new this season from the poles to marquee, To 
summarize Miss LaRoy'’s letter of March 5, 
the new outfit is a standard Driver dramatic 
end, extended eaves and roped every other 
seam, and will be well equipped, have a good 
stage, excellent lighting effects, a stock of 
Gashy scenery und all that goes to meke a 
first-class tent attraction. 

Miss LaRoy disposed of her two Tailroad 
cars to the Gloth Greater (Carnival) Shows 
last May, and the company this season will 
make its jumps by trucks, playing all week 
stands. Miss LaRoy will not take in 
the plays, unless an emergency presents itself, 
but will look after the front and concessions, 
The itinerary will take in old territory and a 
few new stands will be tried out. The per- 
sonnel has been engaged, and the outfit will 
leave Fostoria about the middle of May. 


CENTRAL PLAY COMPANY 
DOING GOOD BUSINESS 


The Central Play Company of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., under the management of F. BE. Cas- 
well, reports a good business for the past year 
in spite of the general depression in theatrical 
circles. 

The company, handling mostly plays from 
the pen of Ernest J. Sharpsteen, during the 
past season has leased bi'ls to many well- 
known companies in all parts of the United 
Siates, includ ng the Blanche Pickert Stock 
on the East Coast, the Walters Players on the 
West coast, the Hunt Stock Company in Mich- 
igan and the Triangle Players in Southern 
Texas. 

“The Infidel,” a new play by Mr, Sharpsteen, 
with a feature ingenue part, will soon be re 
leased for stock and repertoire by this com- 
pany. 


“REP.” ACTORS FLOCK TO 
} CHICAGO STOCK HOUSES 


Chicago, March 8.—Stock managers in Chi- 
cago are drawing on repertoire people to 
strengthen their casts before the “‘rep.” folks 
get their own companies on the road. George 
Roberson is working in Frank Gazzolo’s Im- 
perial Theater stock. Mrs. Roberson (Claudia 
White) is in the cast of the stock in the 
National Theater. Corinne McDonald (Mrs. 
Eskell Gifford) is in Mr. Gazzolo’s Victoria 
Theater stock. Two stock managers are seek- 
ing Mr. Gifford’s services this week and there 
are a number of the other tent dramatic peo 
ple working here and there in the Chicago 
houses, 


DARR-GRAY CO. ORGANIZED 


Organization of the Dart-Gray Stock Com- 
pany has been completed, and the program of 
new plays and vaudeville specialties promises 
to be well worth seeing. The repertoire of 
plays has been ‘selected with great care, and 
the stage settings and electrical effects will 
compare with those carr'ed by similar organ- 
izations. There wil] be twenty-five people with 
the show, it is stated, including a band and or- 
chestra. 


LEW PALMER SIGNS 
WITH GINNIVAN COMPANY 


Lew Palmer, the mimic, has been engaged 
as a‘ special vaudeville attraction by Norma 
Ginnivan for the coming tent season, Mr. Pal- 
mer, besides his vaudeville offerings, will sing 
at the uptown concerts with the band. He 
has contracted the banner and candy privilege. 
Mr. Palmer is at present playing vaudeville 
dates in Canada. 


ANDERSON-GUNN CO. 


' 

Citronelle, Ala., March 9.—The Anderson- 
Gunn Stock Company, which recently played & 
long engagement under canvas at Mobile, is 
in C'tronelle with its big tent theater and 
presenting a repertoire of the latest popular 
comedies and dramas. 


. “BUSTER” IS DEAD 


“Buster”, the beautiful Dane dog owned by 
William Reap, manager of Palmer's “Uncle 
Tom's Cabin’ Company, died in London, Ont., 
March’ 1, Mr. Reap is reported as doing a good 
business in Western Ontario, 


CLARENCE AUSKINGS 
LEAVES ARLIE MARKS 


Clarence Auskings closed March 15 with 
the Arlie Marks Stock Company at Kitchener, 
Ont., 28 the show is going into stock at the Al- 
len Theater there. Mr, Auskings has signed a9 
special agent with the Gollmar Bros.’ Circus 
and stérts his new work in April at Montgom- 
ery, Ala. During the past three seasons be 
has been general agent of the Campbell Bros. 
Circus. 


& 


«2 een! er ' 
| (=REPERTORE=«) eee 
a 

Seco .;  e 

iq 

| ee 

eee 
| ap 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


PEOPLE WANTED, ALL LINES. _ :- 


Between April 15th and May 15th there will be 100 — Shows framing in this territory: and t 
wil) furnish the people for 95 per cent of these shows, this because Managers cam frame their shows through 
ut putting out one cent of advance commission. 

five per cent of their salary imto this office weekly for a period of ten weeks, and 
the fact that my office is open from 9 a.m. till 6 p.m, and that a jong distance call to the 


my office wi 


will reach me any hour mS the day or nitht, 
reliable Manager in this 
spring season I will aah 30 INGENUE 
MEN, 200 GENERAL BUSINESS PEOPLE. 


you play. If 
possible, send photos for office reference, as the 


This office has only been open since last September, and today I am doing nine-tenths 


of this territory. There is a reason why. 


assures Actors and Managers of prompt service 
rritory has made this office his exclusive he 
AND INGENUE LEADING WOMEN, 50 JUVEN}LE LEADING 
35 PIANC PLAYERS, 25 ORCHDSTRAS. FR@M FOUR TO 

S|X PIECES, EITHER LADIES, GENTLEMEN OR MIXED. 
In answering this ad give complete description of yourself as to height, weight, age an 
the 


his office 


People secured through this Exchange pay I need your money till I earn it, 


this system, coupled with 
ladstone Hotel 
1 Ne — every 
coming 


Leading Man, Heavy Man, both tall. Young 
Woman and large General Business Man. 


representative, based on Chicago. 


hence Send photos and program, 


line of parts | always use Choru 
you do specialties, state what y are, and if you double band, name t ostrument, If 
Managers like to see what they are getti give it prompt attention. 
= pustees 
This because I give the business my prompt attenti am in 


NOTE—Wanted for Keys Stock Company, Under Canvas, in Mi 
Woman for Ingenues and 
People doing specialties given preference. Equity contracts 


ACTORS AND MANAGERS, ATTENTION 


my office all day, not outdodging the rent collector nor doing a curbstone brokerage business. Neither do 


Behemente last week im April: 
Business. Large Character 


Dixon and Louise Sherwood, George and Bess Henderson—Write me at once. 
MUSICAL Comrr PRINCIPALS AND CHORUS GIRLS, WHEN AT LIBERTY write thfs office. Can 
MANAGERS AND AOTORS—Make this office your headquarters, Have your mail sont here. Will 


HOUSE MANAGERS—Wanting Shows or Vaudeville Acts, write this office. 


ED. F. FEIST THEATRICAL EXCHANGE 


GLADSTONE HOTEL BLDG. 


KANSAS CITY, MO. 


MANHATTAN PLAYERS 
In Eighth Month of Fairly Good Season 


Paul Hillis and the Manhattan Players are 
now filling their New Jersey time after play- 
ing thru New York and Pennsylvania since 
August 15. Business has varied from good to 
bad, but on the whole the season bas been a 
fairly successful] one. The repertoire includes 
“The Girl He Wanted", ‘“‘The Man From 
Home”, ‘“‘Branded’’, ‘“‘The Nest Egg”, “A 
Warning to Women” and “The Girl of the 
Secret Service’, The company, besides Mr, 
Hillis, includes: Richard Ward, T, Charles 
Keller, William Howat, William Farr, Harry 
Bubb, Winnie Wilmer, Anita Tully, Helen Pot- 
ter Jackson and Mary Kromer. Mr. H'llis’ at- 
tention has been called to a company operating 
in the South using precisely the same title as 
his attraction, and he says it seems rather a 
breach of profess‘onal etiquet for one manager 
to appropriate the title that has made the 
Hillis show an institution in the East for 
twelve years. The summer plans of the Man- 
batten Players are as yet indefinite. Stock 
may be played in a York State city, or the 
players may continue in repertoire thru the re- 
sorts of New York aud New England. 


MANVILLE BROS.’ COMEDIANS 
STILL EN ROUTE IN TEXAS 


Charles F. Manville, owner, and George F. 
Dunnan, business manager, of the Manville 
Bros.’ Comedians, were in Houston, Tex., a 
few days on business recently, and the former 
purchased the private Pullman, *‘Nona’’, from 
Ed C. Nutt. The car was immediately placed 
in the shops for repairs and repainting. 

The two-car show recently played Navasota, 
Tex., ag usual, notwithstanding the fact that 
the town is said to have been closed to all at- 
tractions. Business at present is a little off 
color, it is reported, owing to so much rain, 
which is unusual at ths time of the year in 
Texas. There has been no change in the cast, 
all members of which are Equity, since the 
opening, accord'ng to Mr. Dunnan. The ‘“‘Lou- 
isiana Red Devils’ Orchestra’’ jis the big feature 
this season. Mrs. George F. Dunnan, who was 
called home to La Crosse, Wis., on account of 
the illness of ber mother, has returned to 
the show. 


STRENGTHEN NORTH PLAYERS 


——— 


The “Ted” North Players are still en tour 
in their regular territory in Western Kansas. 
The company has been considerably strength- 
ened by new talent to place in weak spots that 
developed, Return dates were played recently 
at Sharon Springs, Kan., Burlington and Strat- 
ton, Col., and the St. Francis Branch, in all 
of which places the people were found to be in 
& more receptive mood than when the company 
played them last November. The North Play- 
ers will cont’‘nue the week-stand policy until 
May 30, at which time the cast will be en- 
larged in preparation for a stock run at the 
pavilion theater in Coney Island Park, Salina, 
Kan., where Mr. North anticipates the engage- 
ment will continue until Labor Day. The 
Present roster includes, besides Mr, North, the 
names of Marie Peters, W. Edw. Steinel, Billie 
Weston Smth, Earl P. Gregg, Florence Gale, 
Ollie Lester and Joe (Dusty) Rhoades, agent. 


LOCKERY BROS. 
“UNCLE TOM’S CABIN CO.” 


Can place man for Phineas and Legree to double 
Band; Man for Haley and Skeggs, to double Trom- 
bone; Strong Cornet, Clarinet, Trap Drummer, 3 
Colored Boys, other Tom People and Musicians write. 
Eat and sleep on lot, Travel by _ Low, sure 
salary. Address BOX 196, Newton, I 


BURK’S U. T. C. AND 
10-NIGHT CO. WANTS 


Man for JOE menear,. _Dlay Alto or Bass Drum, 


Also Trombone. double Violin in Orchestra. 4 4 
opens (here) April 15th. "iene salary. We yo 
Address 602 Kansas Ave.. TOPEKA, KANS. 


_ AT omen aan at ox 


Ted and Virginia Maxweli 


Box 524. Altus, Okiahome 


Plays! 


40 Plays = AUTHORESS - ACTRESS 

cr |ETHEL MAY SHOREY 
ritten and Her Dramatic Company 

a. For 7 Seasons (summer) 22 Weeks over New England Circuit 

Shorey Home Address, 474 Broadway EAST LYNN, MASS. 


WANTED ACTORS THAT DOUBLE 
BAND OR SPECIALTIES 


Week stands under canvas, for Jennings’ Tent Theatre, Madera, Calif., week 
March 13. Also for Porter’s Comedians, who open in Texas soon. Santa Cruz, 
Calif, Permanent address Both Shows. 


WANTED FOR MASON STOCK CO. 


| ay General Business Men capable of Dlaying, Juveniles or Heavies. State all and make salary ba 3 —— 
sure. Those doing Specialties preferred. Releersal March 27. Show opens April 3rd in North C 
) ¥4 DICK S. MASON, 421 O St., Louwisvil.e, Ky. 


THE JUSTUS-ROMAIN CO. WANTS 


Leading Man, Heavy Man, Man for Characters and Gen. Bus., Woman for Characters and Gen. Bus., A-1 
Novelty Team that can change gems od _we ek—one to play Piano. All people doing Specialties or with 
singing voices given preference. If yo an instrument say so. MU SICIANS, including —_ for Band 
and Orchestra. Show ofems April ith, » hearse ten days earlier. Tell all, with photo, in firs! 


JOHN J. JUSTUS, 924 Litchfield Ave., Wichita. Kansas. 


FOR SALE—40x80 ft. PUSH POLE TOP 


used 28 weeks, in very good condition, roped every other seam, Goss make, no side wall, $150.00; one 25- 
ft. Round Top, extension eaves, with side wall, waterproof, fine shape, $40.00; one Bass Drum, 30-in. 
like new, cymbal and stick goes with it, for $10.00, Above can be seen Garland, Pa. Act quick. as I 
leave here soon. FRED ELZOR, Garland, Pennsylvania. 


FOR SALE COMPLETE TENT OUTFIT 
Consisting of Big Top, Piano, Drums, Reserves, Blues, Cook House, Sleeping Tents, Dishes, Bedding. All the 
above bought new last ering. Write for price and description. This is a real outfit and if you haven’t the 
money save stamp. WANTED—MED. PEOPLE, ge for summer season, opening in April. State 
lowest. You must deliver the goods. Address LESLIE E . KELL, Heavener, Ok., week March i2th; Spring- 
field, Missouri, March 20th to April 8th. 


WANTED FOR BEVERIDGE PLAYERS No. 


(Under Canvas). People in all lines. Specialty People given _ sence, ¥ ano Fiases —- gy stage. Send 
turn, re-War salaries ‘irst-class Age t. pens } 
or eee ee ae + eG AMSDEN. Owner. Litchfield, U1. 


THE OLD RELIABLE BRANDOM-JOHNSON SHOW 


WANTS, for Repertoire under canvas, Band Actors and Actresses, and others. Song and Dance ate for 


Soubrette and Ingenues: Lady for Characters a d General Business, song and dance preferred; Pianist, pree 
ferred who doubles band. All do specialties. Watt real troupers and don’t — present er you won't Bist 
No  —— contracts. (@pen April 15. Rehearsals April 5th, near St. Lous. ite, don’t wift. Show pays 


Address OTTO JOHNSON, Bosworth, Mo. 


HAMMOND THEATRICAL AGENCY 


WANTED—General Business People with Specia'ties. B. and 0, Musicians for summer engagements. 
215 WEST 12TH ST., Empire Hotel, KANSAS CITY, MO 


AT LIBERTY ; 
BUSINESS MANAGER, AGENT, THEATRE MANAGER OR MUSICIAN 


O P Leade If road attractions prefer feature film or first-class temt repertoire in Kansas, 
{cent oe ee your limit. Answer letter only. W. A. STEVENS, Box 386, Smith Center, Kan. 


WANTED FOR PRICE’S COLUMBIA SHOW BOAT 


General Business Team with specialty, Dancing Act to double Parts, Novelty Act doing two or more, 
Drummer wi est first letter. We pay off after joining. Address 
with good line of traps. State your low 5 ES PRICE, Point Pleasant, West Virginia. 


Terry’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin Company Wants 


ore useful Tom People, also Musicians for B. & O. Can also place a few more Colored People 
Oc aeusicians oF cab play Gruams and double stage, HAVE FOR SALD 70-f, Hound und Top, with 40-ft, 
middle piece, in et = good condition and = roped 
bic 


TERRY, Owners; E. C. JONES, Asst. Mgr., Box 165, Little Sioux, lowa. 


LOREN GRIMES and WIFE 


' r season. Man: Characters, Character Comedy or Gen. Bus, Special- 
yh nag Sh, Oise — height. 8 hn aS oan —— oo Se ee etc.; age, 35; 
; i } . Wardr a amd a exsen als. Equity r 
weight, 135; height, 5 ft., 5 in . y and Ww. GRIMES, core Mutt*Show, Houston, Tex. 


WANTED ECCENTRIC FEATURE COMEDIAN 


Musical Comedy People, all lines. Write LOUIS MORGAN, Waterloo Theatre, Waterloo, ta., week March 
; Majestic Theatre, Des Moi 9 and week. 


ees eS 
WANTED FOR B. M. PROY’S ATTRACTIONS 


A-1 Specia!ty Team, Musical Act to feature; mam General Business, wife Chorus. Join immediately. 
d will do first letter. Other useful peorle write. 
i a, SSeS See San ee SM. PROY, 721 Watson St., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 


rejoin his wife, Georgie, who stopped off en 
route to visit friends and relatives. The 
Olesons are property owners in the theatrical 
colony of the Florida City and at the close 
of the coming tent season, plans for which 
have not as yet been decided upon, they will 
return to the land of sunshine and flowers. 


E. H. OLESON A CALLER 


Arriving from Tampa, Fla., last week, E. 
H. Oleson found the weather in Cincinnati 


colder than a bored audience, and he says all 
kinds of wintry weather was experienced on 
the trip. He left for Lexington, Ky., to 


KELL’S COMEDIANS 


To Open Under Canvas April 10—Sea- 
son in Houses Very Good 


Leslie BE. Kell’s Comedians will close the 
season in houses at Heavener, Ok., Saturday 
night, March 18. Mr. Kell will at once leave 
for Springfield, Mo., his home, where he will 
get things ready for the opening under can- 
vas April 10. The season in houses has been 
very good, according to Mr. Kell, considering 
conditions. It was the show's first trip South, 
and, as the natives are said to have liked it, 
Mr. Kell has announced his intention to play 
that territory again next winter. 

There has not been one change made in the 
cast since the opening, it is said, and most all 
members have been engaged for the summer 
tour. The boss canvasman, Ralph Cossairt, 
who has handled the top for Mr. Kell for four 
years, will again be back, also ‘“‘The Musical 
Grays,"’ eight in number, who constitute an 
eight-piece band and six-piece orchestra. Mr. 
Kell is selling one of his outfits, as he says he 
will only have one show on the road this sea- 
son. ‘‘We opened at De Queen, Ark., Monday, 
March 6, to capacity,’ Mr. Kell writes. 

“Mr. Middleton is a real live wire and gets 
the business. Vivian, La., last week, was a 
real good date and the entire company en- 
joyed the nice weather we had there.” 


ETHEL MAY SHOREY’S 
SEVENTH SUMMER SEASON 


The seventh summer season of the Ethel 
May Shorey Dramatic Company will open April 
3, and a route of seventy-six towns in New 
England will be played twice during the sum- 
mer. Every play presented is written by Miss 
Shorey, the leading lady, who has a repertoire 
of forty-three plays. The mus‘c, both instru- 
mental and vocal, is written by Miss Shorey 
and Fred S. Campbell, leading man. New 
scenery has been painted, and among the plays 
to be presented are: ‘‘Dots and Dashes’’, ‘“‘The 
Grouch’, “One Minute of Twelve’, ‘Betty 
and Me"’, “‘The Turning Point’’, “To the High- 
est Bidder’ and “‘A Man and the Woman”. 


WOOD COMEDY Co. CLOSES 


Fred and Camille Wood closed their comedy 
company, last week, in Dousman, Wis., to 
make arrangements for their summer tour, 
This company opened the winter season early 
in October last, playing thru Nortbern Illinois, 
crossing into Wisconsin and playing the East- 
ern part of Iowa, from thence north into Min- 
nesota, crossing at Red Wing and returning 
via Central Wisconsin to Madison. Over five 
months of one and two-night stands, at fair 
business, is the record of this season’s work. 
One hundred and thirty-one towns were played 
by the organization in the four States. The 
Woods will be identified with a well-known 
repertoire company for the summer under can- 
vas, and have gone to their home in Clinton, 
IiL., to await the call. 


Trap GILBERT AYERS TO 


LAUNCH TENT SHOW 


Gilbert Ayers, who has been in the carnival 
business for the past ten years, will launch 
a vaudeville show under canvas this season, 
making three-night stands thru New York 
State. The tent will be a 40x70 and two 
trucks will convey the show. Fifteen people 
will) be engaged, including a band and or- 
chestra. Oswego, N. Y., is the winter quarters 
and the show will open there May 18. 


At Liberty--Ageut--At Liberty 


dle any kind of amusement, route and book. 

Rp "Show preter Thirty a ag 
te or wor! years’ expe 

Of Paste OF MOT al Motel “North Little Bock, Ark. 

until April 15. 


SY AT 
JACK HAMILTON AND 
VIRGINIA LEE 


Te with Specialties. Open for 
o— stand ep. only.” Can join em wire, Address 


AT LIBERTY WM. C. WILMAT 


Boss Canvasman 22 y<ars; 38 years old: Ley - 
trade. One year with Brunk’s Comedians No. 1. 

join advance. , Prefer Rep. wh sina.” One-Nighte, 
Only responsible managers. go a 

and Reliable. Address WAL. ¢. WILMAT. Get, Deb, 
or Western Union, Temple, T 


ro | - 
| i 
| 
Sn ae a 
= ee ee | 
nC = | 
_ —— , 
ee a 
ggg es 
ee ee 
a 
Or, a ; 
=aeeeverer: ee | 
Winncanstie tances oF Heme of B. F. O. E., PO 
eee ee | if 
| as 


Bi. 
iy 
t 


% 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


AND AMERICAN ENDEAVOR IN GRAND OPERA, SYMPHONY 


AND CHAMBER MUSIC AND CLASSIC DANCING 
By IZETTA MAY McHENRY 


OPEN AIR CONCERTS 


Essential to Crowded Cities— 
Music Now Proved To Be 
Important Factor in 
All Communities 


With the coming of spring one hears plans 
talked of for the amusements to be offered the 
multitudes, and in many cities the appropria- 
tion for the music fund is under discussion. 
Each succeeding year finds greater interest 
manifested in the presentation during the sum- 
mer months of concerts in the open, especially 
in the congested districts of the cities. In this 
field particularly has good work been done by 
the National Bureau for the Advancement of 
Music in that, thru instituting Music Weeks, 
Spring Music Festivals, Music Contests, etc., 
the public has in many ways been brought to 
a realization of the importance of music in 
our every-day life. Many cities have each year 
increased the fund set aside from the purpose 
of providing concerts in the open air and this 
year is to be no exception, judging by reports 
which are reaching us, and in a short time we 
will publish a list of the cities in which the 
music fund has been increased in order to give 
more concerts during the heated term and to 
cover a wider field in the larger cities. 

Right now is the time to plan the summer's 
musical programs. Community sing leaders, 
directors of the local musical organizations 
and managers of parks should begin now to 
prepare programs which will interest their en- 
tire community. Band concerts, community 
sing contests, concerts for special events wiil 
interest thousands and bring huge enjoyment 
if properly presented. Pageants can be used 
alike in city and country and there is a wealth 
of material easily available—pageants for Dec- 
oration Day, for Independence Day, for mid- 
summer events, for Harvest Home occasions, and 
thru these the interest of the entire community 
can be obtained, because selection of a pageant 
can be made wherein it will be possible to 
utilize local musical organizations, the Girl 
Scouts, Boy Scouts, school children, the for- 
eigners in the community. 

Anyone wanting information relative to suit- 
able pageants can obtain it by writing Kenneth 
8. Clark, Secretary Community Service, 1 Madi- 
Son avenue, New York City, who gives many 
excellent suggestions in a special article on the 
subject of summer music published elsewhere 
in this issue. 


From the East to the West Coast and from 
the North to the South the attendance at open- 
air concerts, particularly the free concerts, is 
enormous. In Boston the free concerts were 
so largely attended it was impossible to accom- 
modate the crowds and additional concerts 
were given. In New York City, wherever free 
concerts are to be heard, one must go very 
early to get a seat. At Cincinnati the Sunday 
afternoon concerts at Eden Park draw thou- 
Sands each summer, and the sloping terraces 
hich form the natural amphitheater are 
hronged with people. At Golden Gate Park in 
n Francisco it is impossible to estimate how 
many people attend the concerts, and if one 
visits the stadium of the University at Berkeley 
on a Sunday afternoon it would be to find it 
overcrowded with folks who had come to listen 
to the musical program. A visit to parks and 
the winter resorts of Florida tells the same 
story—wherever concerts are given in the open 
the people throng to enjoy the music. 


Many cities have proven that summer opera 
can be made a success and during this coming 
season several more will present opera at popu- 
lar prices. Much progress has been made in 
bringing music to the general public during the 
summer season, but we would urge our readers 
among the leaders of musical organizations, 
park managers and the directors of fairs to ac- 
cord music a greater place in their plans for 
the summer of 1922. Make the musical pro- 
grams a feature of the attractions to be enjoyed 
from June to September. Special music for 
especial events, tableaux illustrating historical 
events, pageants can easily be obtained and we 
will gladly give names of firms from whom 
these can be had. Make the summer of 1922 
noteworthy from a musical standpoint in your 
community. 


COSTUME RECITAL 


By Noted Artists at Columbia Uni- 
versity 


Tnder the auspices of the Institute of Arts 
and Sciences of Columbia University, a Cos- 
tume Recital has been announced for the eve- 
ning of March 30, in the Horace Mann Audi- 
torium. In the recital will be included Vistas 
of Old Romance; An Evening of Ballads, and 
the soloists will be Miss Sydney Thompson, 
reader; and George Harris, Jr., tenor. 


ALBERT COATES, 


Eminent English Conductor, Re-En- 
gaged by New York Symphony 


Music lovers are again to have the pleasure 
of listening to concerts given under the di- 
rection of Albert Coates. Mr. Coates has been 
re-engaged by the New York Symphony Or- 
echestra directors as guest conductor of the or- 
ganization next season. He will direct the 
concerts given during the months of January 
and February of 1923. 


FRIEDA KLINK, 
the young Americam singer, is rapidly forging ahead im the coucert field. 
as soloist with musical organizations and has been booked for many engagements during the spring. 


She is much in demand 


WALTER DAMROSCH 


To Present First of Three Explanatory 
Recitals March 19 


Wagner's “Tristan and Isolde” is announced 
as the subject of the first of three explanatory 
recitals to be given by Walter Damrosch in 
Aeolian Hall, New York City, and the date is 
March 19. Mr. Damrosch will discuss ‘‘Parsi- 
fal” on April 2, and “The Mastersingers’’ 
April 9. 


RUSSIAN GRAND OPERA CO. 
TO BE HEARD IN CHICAGO 


Chicago, March 9.—The Russian Grand Opera 
Company will appear in the Olympic Theater 
March 19 for a season of three weeks. This 
organization, quite new to this country, re 
vently landed on the Coast from the Orient and 
has made a furore among opera lovers in the 
West. It is said to have been organized séven 
years ago in Petrograd, driven out by the 
burgevisie when the Bolshevik movement gained 
the ascendency, has ninety-six people in its 
cast, orchestra, ballet and a repertoire of fifteen 
Russian operas, among which is “‘The Snow 
Maiden.” 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


——— 


For Three Southern Cities Being 
Planned 


A movement is under way to establish a 
symphony orchestra for New Orleans, Birming- 
ham and Atlanta. This announcement was 
made recently by Miss Corinne Mayer, who is 
president of the Philharmonic Society. A meet- 
ing has been called for March 16 at Birming- 
ham, when plans will be formulated for this 
purpose, and if completed the organizing of 
such an orchestra would make it porsible for 
it to play two months in each of the cities 
mentioned above. 


GABRILOWITSCH 


To Give Last Recital of This Season in 
New York City 


Ossip Gabrilowitsch, noted pianist and con- 
ductor, will give only one more recital this 
season in New York City, the date of which 
is March 18. His program will be made up 
of compositions by Mendelssohn, Schubert, 
Chopin and Brabms. 


RACHMANINOFF 


Given Enthusiastic Reception as Soloist 
With New York Symphony 

New York, March 9.—One of the most de- 
lightful concerts of the current season was 
given by the New York Symphony Orchestra 4 
at Carnegie Hall, on yesterday afternoon, with 
Sergei Rachmaninoff as soloist. Mr. Rachman- 
inoff chose his F-Sharp Minor Pianoforte Con- 
certo, which incidentally bears the composer's 
first opus number and was written before he 
had gained recognition outside his native coun- 
try, playing it in a masterly manner such as 
to evoke whole-hearted enthusiasm from his 
listeners. The remainder of the program in- 
cluded Cesar Franck’s D-Minor Symphony, Res- 
pighi arrangement of Dances of the Sixteenth 
Centary—Ballet, ‘‘Il Conte Orlando,"’ and Gag- 
liarda—and a Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas 
Tallis, for strings, by Vaughn Williams, played 
for the first time in this country. 


COMMUNITY SERVICE 


Issues Interesting Bulletin 


Thru the Community Service, 1 Madison 
avenue, New York City, an interesting and 
valuable bulletin bas been issued which con- 
tains full data for the presentation of three 
operas. This new scheme has been devised 
for the purpose of affording at least a glimpse 
of grand opera, by presenting a narration of 
the story of an opera and the playing of the 
records in their proper order. The Community 
Service is making the suggestion to its local 
groups that the groups lay the plan before the 
publie school heads in their communities. The 
operas which the Community Service has includ- 
ed in their bulletin are ‘‘Martha,’’ ‘‘Carmen” 
and ‘‘Aida,”’ and a summary of the story, lists 
of the available phonograph records for the 
various arias as issued by the leading com- 
panies, directions for the arranging of dances, 
preparing scenery and costuming are given. 


: SYRACUSE 


To Hold Twentieth Annual Music 
Festival 


May 8, 9 and 10 have been announced as the 
dates for the Annual Musical Festival at Syra- 
cuse, N, Y., the 1922 festival being the twen- 
tieth in the history. The Cleveland Symphony 
Orchestra, directed by Nicoali Sokoloff, has 
been engaged for the festival, and six proml- 
nent artists have been engaged for appearances. 
They are Florence Easton, Marguerite,d' Alvarez, 
Tita Schipa, George Smith, John Saleen and 
Hallie Stiles. The Senior Festival Chorus, con- 
ducted by Prof. Howard Lyman, will be heard 
in one performance, as will also the Junior 
chorus, directed by John J. Raleigh. 


N. Y. CHAMBER MUSIC 


Society To Be Sieard in Aeolian Hall 
on March 20 


Gretchen Dick, concert manager, has an- 
nounced March 20 as the date of the third sub- 
scription concert of the New York Chamber 
Music Society, Carolyn Beebe, director. The 
pro.ra includes Henry Hadley’s ‘Andante 
and Scherzo,"’ which will be played from manu- 
script. Other numbers to be presented are 
compositions by Brahms, Coleridge-Taylor and 
Roussel, 


BOSTON SYMPHONY 


Announces Second Pension Fund 


i Concert 
In S$mphony Hall, Boston, the Symphony Or- 
chest under Conductor Monteux, the 
of the annual concerts for its Pension Fund 


will be given Sunday afternoon, March 26. The 
program to be presented by Mr. Monteux will 
be an all-Wagner one. 


LAST NEW YORK CONCERT 


This Season To Be Given March 21 by 
Frieda Hempel 


On Tuesday evening, March 21, Frieda Hem- 
pel will give her fourth and last recital in 
New York City this season. This concert will 
take place in Carnegie Hall. 


' F . 
H 44 ee a 
enn ree Ss 
I oe a A ee EO satiate a ES SS CSN EE NEN RRL PES SR Le es 
4 F 
: Yy Yy Uy” y Vy, U; yyy UY yyy WqYqJywJywW" Wy 
fMYVyyyyyy Hf yy Yj Yy y Yj, G Yj Yi Uf Y Yj CU MMwWwM@Muyysjjyg yf 
YY) ff Yy / Yyfy jy / / Wf) HE@@MJZH]V]}]!', Wi); YY yyw YY 
: y j YY —Y y WY; % Z 4 Y) Uy Yj 
zr, Y Y J , y 4 Yyy Yj 
, Yj Y 4 Yyy Yy Y Yy j Uy YY Y Y j Yj 
) J Ti y, y Y py Miittittis Yi Yj 
=U “ , G / YyyffyMMMwywywyvwj— WY 
f 
. ee 
e 
i 
| 
: 
ie Er Po 
+f? 
of 
‘ | | 
ri | ia } 2 ee 
He | f * ee 
| | a qe 
4 Pe ie ‘ 
Ee | e « -3y - < 7 . 
rl | * “za i a 
? * ee és 
ue | ts ~- Ve 
. . ; | SC 
ib | y | es 
eae | | 
| ea F ee 
i} a - 4 * , = 7 
| - > " . 
/ | ES a | Pe 
es are & se 
: Mees ; ee ie pre : 
Bees? abi ca? 5s alia 
ae See ne or ai 
“ae ae | 
— — 
' fre 
ee te 
if Ne pos Se ae 
{ : * By as aes 
eR Ge 
So ’ aWaF.aR 
J Sa 
es ae Pies: 
fos | Ue ’ 
SO a i Sea x 
; ee Bg ea “4 ae «Soe 4 
fi Ce a y , 
| i Re Sel, gk c 
ne 13 a ie St RE \q 
i Bo 
ae a 
eae 
i Pe 
Po 
Bg 
er — 
| ee 
| d 
t 
‘ 
t 
: { 


MARCH 18, 1922 The Billboard 


DISCRIMINATIN 
TEACHERS AND SINGERS 


WILL MAKE SURE OF EXAMINING THE FOLLOWING, WHICH HAVE THE ENDORSEMENT OF THE 
BEST MUSIOIANS AND MUSICAL CRITICS IN AMERICA: 


civic ORCH ESTRA 


Of Milwaukee To G Give Concerts in 
April and June 


MOTION PICTURE MUSIC 
NOTES 


An interesting musical program is being pre- 
sented at the Capitol Theater, New York City, 
this week, the Capitol Orchestra, Erno Rappe 
conducting, playing Victor Herbert's “Irish 


The new Civic Orchestra of Milwaukee, which 
bas the support of the Civic Music Association 
of that city, is making rapid progress and an- 
nouncement is made that concerts will be given 
during the months of April and June. The or- 


Rhapsody’’ as the opening number, which in- 
a SONGS “ uy ’ 
chestra was first organized by the Wisconsin ‘Yearning for You,” C. Harold Lowden........ 600 ss eMorning: Song Mt the Bs Birds* Sr aici troduces a series of Irish divertissements, with 
Conservatory of Music under the direction of * on OS Bong. sg A. Lapis Se armotin Peeewes - 600 At Sunrise” .....ceceseeceeees eceecceceees-600 Miss Marguerite Schuiling as the soloist. Miss 
Carl Eppert, but recently enlisted the interest opunnin yn 4 1 y A “or a h .~ Pe ag tage arte ‘ = Schuiling is a pupil of Frank LaForge, the noted 
and support of the Civic Music Association, and «My Creed,” Beulah B. Wiley...... 60c “Twilight Fancies’* 60¢ composer-pianist, and her voice has attracted 
at present numbers 70 musicians, and it is {:Pestiny.” | — > cues ‘Anson’ ‘Aiba “Soe OS ET” cosescres apache 60¢ considerable attention. Kerry dances and sev- 
hoped that soon 100 members will be enrolled. «June pays.” Beulah B. Wilev................., 60c The Set. $1.50. eral rounds of the Irish reel are being intro- 
The chief purpose of the organization is the “tie Honey Lamb, Good-Night,”” Domar C. “At Twilight.” C. Hessle Lowden eo duced by the ballet corps. 
same as that of other similar civic bodies, 7. 70MY vrs ast ss Siuctt sec teeceeeneenees BIE vo ateaceraticciddasectecse covccccvocces wegen 
rd rtunity t i sdust os You,” Eugene Platzman. ooo... 0.., ,,0e Full Orchestra. $1.50 the Set. The California Theater, of San Francisco, 
prec = sor Ue eae teeter Gx a Siig, Sweet Lit a Small Set. $1.60, less discount. recently had a sort of musical festival, with 
ctutente of the etty 0 te takes & & And scores of other sacred and secular songs with ORGAN Victor Herbert conducting, and the orchestra 
chestral work and thus fit them for positions real merit. layed sti ' f th ted ‘i 
ith‘ symphony orchestras “Grand Chocur in E Minor.” Wm. T. Timmings. .60e played interesting programs of the noted com 
7“ a pai omen % ts slesned to have PIANO “Meditation,” James seccecceccecceesess600 poser’s most popular works. 
8 ; “The Introduction,” by Russell Snively Gilbert. : > 
the Civic Orchestra give concerts in the schools 24 4 Studies in Duet Form for Beginner and VIOLIN " The Original oe Laney —— = 
of Milwaukee and suburban towns, “Batage,” James B. DUR. cccccceccoccccecceses a@ success on e musical program o 
Also published for Violin, "Harp and Organ... .. $1. ry Je r 
ol er fe Seedy for mee Woens a 4s Rivet Theater, New York, last week, is ec 
CHICAGO OPERA COMPANY by Russell S, Gilbert. Critics are unanimous cupying an important place on this week's 
MADE “ONE-NIGHT” STAND 8 - is of tremendous value to every vocal bill, playing “‘Bimini Bay’’ and ‘‘Chanson Dan- 
ude eereeee 


Chicago, March 13.—The Chicago Grand Opera 
Company dropped into its home town and gave 
a performance of ‘“‘Lohengrin” last night, it 
being in the nature of a “‘sandwich’’ date be- 
tween Pittsburg and Milwaukee. Nevertheless 
it was a gala occasion. 

“Lohengrin’’ was sung in English, with Cyrena 
Van Gordon as Ortrud, Rosa Raisa as Elsa and 
Edward Johnson in the title role. Miss Van 
Gordon has been singing Wagnerian roles with 
the company, and during its engagement in New 
York her success was such that it was reported 
e+e had been engaged by the Metropolitan. From 
Milwaukee the company will go West as far 
as San Francisco. 

The performance last night was brilliant and 
its entire success was augmented by the un- 
qnestioned welcome that the packed house ex- 
tended to its own after their absence on tour. 
Mr. Polacco conducted. 


NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC 
WILL PLAY IN BOSTON 


On March 16 the Philharmonic Orchestra, un- 
der the direction of Willem Mengelberg, will 
give a concert in Symphony Hall, Boston, and 
on this occasion will present “Ein Helden- 
leben,”” a tone poem by Richard Strauss, which 
was dedicated to the guest conductor of the 
Philharmonic and his Amsterdam Orchestra. On 
the following evening, the 17th, the noted or- 
ganization will give a concert at Yale Uni- 
versity. Ernest Schelling will be the soloist 
for the New York concert on the following 
Tuesday evening, at the Metropolitan Opera 
House, which will also be conducted by Mengel- 
berg. 


MUSIC WEEK FOR DES MOINES 


Sponsored by the Fortnightly Musical Associa- 
tion of Des Moines, Ia., a great citywide cele- 
bration is announced for the week of April 16 
to 23. The associate membership of 500 has 
made arrangements to carry thru the Music 
Week programs in the schools, colleges, 
churches, theaters, motion picture h + pub- 


eee neeee 


EVERY FIRST-CLASS MUSIC STORE IN THE COUNTRY WILL SUPPLY ALL OUR PUBLICATIONS 


Rosa Raisa, Giovanni Martinelli, 


Vera Curtis, Elsie Baker, Olive Nevin, Minnie Carey Stine and hundreds 


of other noted Singers are DISCRIMINATORS, We gladly send “on approval.” 


THE HEIDELBERG PRESS 


PUBLISHERS FOR DISCRIMINATORS 


45th AND RACE STREETS, 


PHILADELPHIA 


JAMES MASSELL 


1425 Broadway, New York. 


ARTISTIC SINGING 


Taught by 


Singers breathing. 


The vocal mechanism; open throat, 
attack and sustaining of the attack. 
Correct mute and vocal exercises. 


Mind concentration. Relaxation. 
Hygiene of voice. 


Style, Diction, Interpretation, Stage 
Deportment, Repertoire of English, 
French, Italian, German, Russian 
Operas, Songs and Musical Comedy. 


Studie: 30 Metropolitan Opera House, 
Tel. Bryant 1274, 


If you 
get in me. 
students now prominent before public, 


NEW YORK, 


VOCAL INSTRUCTIONS 

a YF 8 Te apeciai is TEACHING ‘THE THE NIGH Tones ead tones). pa 
Individual instructions. 

MM. KOSINSKA 


The Eminent Vocaj Trainer end Coach, Opera Singer, Prima Donna, Paris, ‘Petregrad, Bertin, eto. 
244 LENOX AVE, 


HARLEM 8147. 


lic welfare organizations, public institutions 
and the industrial and newspaper plants. 


BACHAUS 
To Give Fourth wy Recital at Town 
a 


Withelm Bachaus, distinguished pianist, is 
to give another recital in New York City. This 


concert, which will be his fourth this season, 
will be given in the Town Hall on March 24. 


NOTED ARTISTS FOR ATLANTA 
On the evening of March 24 a joint recital will 
be given by che noted concert artists, Efrem 
Zimbalist, violinist, and Alma Gluck, soprano. 
While both artists have been heard in Atlanta 
on previous occasions, this will mark their first 
appearance on the same program. 


The 


Betty Tillotson 


Concert Bureau 
180 Madison Ave., New York City 


Presents 
Distinctive artists for all sorts of 
engagements. Openings for many 
g00d voices and instrumentalists. 


Communicate by letter only 


ETHEL CLARK 


SOPRANO 


Cite Br Y CORNELL, “Gor Caineste Hall, Ne¥. G. 


| CONCERT AND 


OPERA NOTES 


Car} Craven, tenor, has been engaged to give 
a recital at Fort Dodge, Ia., on March 21. 

Felix Salmond, English cellist, will give his 
first recital in New York City at Aeolian Hall 
March 28. 

Marion Armstrong, soprano, has been booked 
by the Tillotson Bureau for a spring concert 
tour of Nova Scotia. 

Idelle Patterson, well-known soprano, will 
be heard in her annual New York recital in 
Aeolian Hall March 23. 

Fritz Kreisler will give his second and last 
recital in Chicago this season Sunday after- 
noon, March 26, at the Auditorium. 

Leopold Godowsky, famous pianist, gives two 
Piano recitals in San Francisco the evening of 
March 21 and the afternoon of March 26. 


The noted baritone of the Metropolitan Opera, 
Giuseppe Danise, will be soloist at the Music 
Festival at Evanston, Ill., on May 26. 

The tenor role in ‘‘Stabat Mater’’ will be 
taken by Theo. Karle, American singer, when 
presented at the Evanston Music Festival in 
May. 

Rudolph Reuter, American pianist, has an- 
nounced the opening of his summer classes in 
his new studio on June 19, to continue until 
July 26. 

Mary Welch, contralto, will appear for the 
third time this season as soloist with the Apollo 
Club of Chicago at their concert to be given on 
May 1. 

A concert will given in Orchestra Hall, Chi- 
cago, the evening of March 21 by the Bush 
Conservatory Orchestra Symphony Training 
School directed by Richard Czerwonky. 

Manager James T. Moxley, of the Russell 
Theater, Ottawa, Can., bas booked Josef Ro- 


senblatt, the noted lyric-dramatic coloratura 
tenor, for a recital on the evening of March 20. 

Henrietta Conrad, soprano, will give her 
New York recital in Aeolian Hall Tuesday after- 
noon, March 21. Miss Conrad will be assisted 
by Frank LaForge, well-known composer-pianist. 

The twenty-first annual commencement con- 
cert of the Columbia School of Chicago, founded 
and directed by Clare Osborne Reed, is an- 
nounced for May 31 in Orchestra Hall, The con- 
cert will be given with full orchestra, directed 
by Ludwig Becker. 


The Manchester Musical Association, of Man- 
chester, N. H., has engaged the Keene Chorus 
Club for the May Music Festival which is to 
be held May 21-26. For this occasion the club 
will consist of 200 women and 125 men. 


Idelle Patterson, well-known coloratura so- 
prano, will give her annual New York recital 
on March 23, in Aeolian Hall. Mme. Patterson 
will be accompanied by her husband, A. Russ 
Patterson, a well-known vocal teacher of New 
York City. 


Albert Coates, the English conductor, who 
has been here for the past ten weeks appearing 
as, guest conductor of the New York Symphony 
Orchestra, returned to England on March 15, 
taking with him several compositions by Amer- 


icans which he will present for the first time 
in England. 


The Society of Fine Arts, Washington, D. C., 
has made arrangements to present the New 
York Symphony Orchestra in a series of five 
concerts next season, three of which to be 
under the direction of Walter Damrosch, and 
the last two to be conducted by Albert Coates, 
guest conductor. 


sante."* In addition, George Richardson, bari- 
tone, is soloist, singing “Drinking Song” from 
Thomas’ “Hamlet.” 


A feature which proved popular to the pat- 
rons of the Capitol Theater, of Detroit, was 
introduced last week. A symphony orchestra 
of seventy-five musicians, recruited from var- 
ious theater orchestras, directed by Edward 
Werner, gave a symphony concert, and owing 
to the success of the venture, the Kunusky man- 
agement intends making the symphony concert 
a regular feature on Sundays, 

Herbert Waterous, basso, a favorite of the 
patrons of the New York Strand, is singing 
this week, for the first time anywhere, “Bells 
of the Sea’”’ by Solman. The Second Hungarian 
Rhapsody, by Liszt, is the overture for the 
week, directed by Cary Edouarde. 

Hugo Riesenfeld’s Rialto, New York, has 
for this week’s overture Victor Herbert's 


“Trish Rhapsody,’® directed by Mr. Riesenfeld 
and Joseph Littau. 


A PETTIS . 
H CONCERT a ean 
L SOLOIST 

FE For terms and dates apply to ANTONIA 
‘WW SAWYER, Maor., Acolian Hall, New York City. 


A Ls 


JACK MILLS, Inc. 
’ MUSIC PUBLISHERS ~ 
: 152 West 45th Street | 
NEW YORK CITY 


* 


snimannutitrnaeenjuesitaritee 


“SUGGESTS ~ 


“TA 
SWUHLAND® 


Singers, Quartets, Chautau- 
qua Artists, Orchestras, Etc. 


a 


TTT 


- 


< 
v 
c 
a 
oO 
<. 
a 
wv 
a 
a 
9 
3 
8 
a 

mi 


ANY. MATERIAL 
" YOU MAY DESIRE 
FOR THIS PURPOSE 


WILL BE SENT 


Hs sciaaanevuatcntianridiiolit | 


-t 
TUUUATEEEEUUEL 


MMM 


f . 
45 “4h 
e oe 
sca ce 7 
eee ee , : es 
ee | | 
r 
SS . 
: 4 
— — Ie | 
SEE LE AS EN a I TE TE, ETNIES ETT ETE OE IORI IIE TCC ELE . 
wo 2 eae 7 
ne " Cans } 
ons . ae a 
te 2 os SS arene 
o : * “oS j 
~ «ge ~ b 
4 > ‘ i 
EES EE es | 
Po e . . . 3 ’ 7. 2 | . | 
, = _ ’ a ; : 
Ss 7 : . ‘ Po : 
—_— * ip i & 7 * a2 | 
a : a BES. rates 4 
oh sy s | 
ae 4 : 3. ; 3 
. oad : : ve — . 3 
PRS es P| 
ry rn EES SST ; 
Nn of - 5. “s i 
x “ae ee | @ 
et st { 
, . b Beit fs = tt 
- . = * th ee 7 : 
y Ewe. - 
. "y be — a 
; —_ ; = 
: * = 
. 2 fae . “1 = 
| : — 7 4 
a ened 
la A EP Sn = : 
ee =. 
— 
= 
pee Zo 
ee : : 
= = 
= = 
— = 
= = 
= for 
id : ! 
LS TS SS SS = 
| = 
Po = 
— 
— 
— 
| = | 
= | 
- : 
— 
le = Barf sGesdns fed ; ae : 
= ON REQUEST. 
— te ae : ed 
ee 
ee : fi 
1 SS A RS I SN SSE AT ASTER 
Ld : 
4 my 
. Ae 
{ < 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


WHEEL 
ATTRAC- 
TIONS 


j 
bd 


mam 
“KE 


Wh 


BURLESQUE STOCK COMPANY 
For the Park Theater, Columbus Circle 


ae ee ee 


New York, March 6.—The Minsky Brothers, 
at present operating the National Winter Gar- 


7 oe 

A den Theater on the lower East Side, have 
x signed and concluded negotiations for a long- 
bs term lease covering the Park Theater, Colum- 


vy 


; bus Circle. The sark Theater for the past 
if two seasons has been under the lease and per- 
j eona] direction of John Cort, who secured this 

ft property from the Flack Estate. 


A ae It was rumored for a long time that the Min- 
ekyS were in negot with a number of 
Broadway theater owners to secure a prominent 

; spot slong the Rialto for the purpose of offer- 

ing their style of entertainment, burlesque, to 

the followers of this class of amusement. The 


ation 


, oe lease, signed by the Minsky Brothers with 
rf 1} Jobn Cort, will involve a sum exceeding $1,185,- 
: 800, covering the period of this lease. The 
P theater has recently undergone complete reno- 
: vation, and its interior almost entirely rebuilt 

: ] by the present lessee at an expense of $62,000, 


which makes this one 


7 New York's most 
. elaborate show palaces. 


: 
Os 


> The Minskys announce that at their new 

; etand they will present a big musical bur- 
baie” lesque extravaganza w.th a company made up 
ibs of 40 chorus girls, an Eng‘ish pony ballet of 
Be 16, and 15 principals, together with many 
ie foreign novelties to be dovetailed into the 

‘ ehow. Vaudeville headliners will be intro- 

. 4 duced weekly as added attractons. The mana- 


gers are now concluding plans to sign New 
York’s most popular columnists for the purpose 
of writing a new travesty to be used in the 
show each week burlesquing popular events, 
topical subjects and legitimate Broadway bits, 
Ap unusual jazz orchestra of twenty wil) fur- 
| nish the musical program of the show, and a 
' Hawaiian octe‘te will furnish weird strains in 
the spacious foyer back of the orchestra floor 
during interm'ssion. 
It is the intention to change shows weekly, 
carrying the same company thruout the season. 
‘ Showmen along the Rialto predict that this 
: policy at the Park Theater will be a success 
in view of the fact that it is said to be the 
most logical spot for such a show. Thi's idea 
seems to strike a paralle] to the old successful 
Hammerstein's Victoria, which Was so popular 
some years ago before the late impresario left 
that field for grand opera. 
‘William Minsky is now contemplating a trip 
abroad to visit the foreign capitals in search 


DANZELL 


Of Jaffee Stock 


Burlesque 
HAS OPEN TIME 


Address Billboard, 
516 Lyceum Bldg. 
PITTSBURG, PA. 


A PATENT TOUPEE 


The finest in the 
world. It can’t to 
copied. Prewar prices 
on all our goods. 


—_— 
: Catalog Free. Write. 
ait 20% Discount. by 
mentioning ‘‘ The 
— Bill board.” 
Made by the 


LOMBARD BAMBINA CO. 
113 MUNROE ST. LYNN, MASS. 


SUPPORTERS 


AND ALL OTHER SUPPLIES. 
Send for Free Illustrated Catalogue. 


WAAS & SON, 226 N. 8th St., Philadelphia, Pa, 


$T. DENNIS HOTEL, DETROIT, MICH 


Corner po and ee om 1 on 
Minutes From A neatres. refessiona . 
. JAS. J. HOLLINGS. 


ANTOINETTE DENNINGER 


rly with Joly Girls Burlesque. Married Lea- 
i WR-TE BOX B 2, Billboard, New York. 
CROSS & BANTA 


WINDOW CARDS Stow rrint co. 


501 SOUTH DEARBORN STREET, CHICAGO, 


Conducted by ALFRED NELSON 


Of novelties with intention of putting the Park 


Musie Hall on a par with the Moulin Rovge in 
Paris, 

The Minskys will take possession of the 
Park Theater September 1, 1922. The house, 
thereafter, will be known as the Park Musie 
Hall. The Minskys will continue also atetheir 
present stand, the National Winter Garden. 


“BATHING BEAUTIES” 


To Play Over Poli Time in New 
England 


New York, March 8.--The success of Gal- 
lagher & Bernstein's “‘Bathing Beauties’’ at 
the Lafayette Theater, New York, attracted 
the attention of representatives of the Poli 
people, who arranged to book it over their New 
England Vaudeville Circuit, opening at Bridge- 
port, Conn., March 13, for a week's engage- 
ment of a one-hour-and-forty-five-minute show 
twice daily for the entire week, thereby chang- 
ing the policy of the house from split to full- 
week engagements. Additional vaudeville 
will be furnished by the Poli people. 


AMERICAN BURLESQUE ASSN. 
“Sitting Pat and Saying Nothing” 


New York, March 9.—Burlesquers in general 
crowded each other around Colunrbia Corner on 


Tuesday, awaiting what they expected to be more 
Startling revelations as a result of the special 
meeting of the directors of the Amrican Bur- 


lesque Association, but when I. H. Herk was 
intervicwed in his office this morning, he said: 
“We are ‘Sitting pat and saying nothing.’ 


Telative to what took place Tuesday; suffice 
it to say that we are not asleep at the 
switch, but very much awake and we will issue 
another statement when we deem it advisable.”* 


REDELSHEIMER REPORTS 


New York, March 9.—Louis, at his agency in 
the Columbia Theater Building, reports engage- 
ments, viz.: Hal and Babe Rathbun, comic and 
soubret; George B. Hill, comic; Pep Bedford, 
soubret, and Constance Williams, prima donna, 
for the Gayety Stock, Philadelphia, week of 
March 13, and the Folly Stock, Baltimore, week 
of March 20, 

Chuck Wilson and Oce (Fatty) Hamilton, 
comics; Johnny Kane, sraight; May Hamilton, 
ingenue; Miss Baker, soubret, for the Trocadero 
Stock, Philadelphia, week of March 13, and the 
Majestic Stock, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., week of 
March 20. 


Sheriff Jack Levy closed as advance agent of 
“Chick Chick,” and transfered his activities 
ahead of the ‘Social Follies’? on the American 
Circuit. 


BURLESQUE REVIEWS 


“FOLLIES OF THE DAY” 
“FOLLIES OF THE DAY’—A Columbia Cir- 
cuit attraction, featuring ‘Bozo’? Snyder, 
Gertiude Hayes, Jr., and Johnny Webber, 
presented by Barney Gerard at the Casino 
Theater, Brooklyn, N. Y., week of March 6. 


THE CAST—Boro Snyder, Sam Green, Ed- 
ward Critchiey, Morton Beck, Matty White, 
John B. Williams, George Gorman, Johnny Web- 
ber, Harry Watson, Bob Tolliver, Julie De 
Cameron, Gertrude Hayes, Jr.; May Dix. 

PART ONE 

Scene 1—Was an elaborate scenic set of 
“Creation” for an ensemble of prancing ponies 
and show girls of the youthful, pretty, slender 
type in a song recital on their qualifications 
in showland. 

Then came Edward Critchley, representing 
drama; Morton Beck, comedy; Matty White, 
opera; John B. Williams, burlesque, and George 
Gorman as ‘‘Father Time,”’ in which Burlesquer 
Williams scored the opening laugh by asking 
“Father Time’’ what time it js and then telling 
the other authors that it was time for burlesque 
in the form that Barney Gerard produces and 
presents it, with a come-back from ‘‘Father 
Time’’ to sprinkle it with drama, comedy, opera 
and burlesque, and that is just what the en- 
tire company did until the final drop of the 
curtain. 

Scene 2—Was a drop for Messrs. Williams, 
White, Beck and Critchley to vocalize harmoni- 
ous!y on their abilities as ‘‘Impresarios,’’ with 
a few comedy steps in dancing by Burlesquer 
Williams, 

Scene 3—Was a satin drape for Harry Wat- 
son, a natty juvenile accompanied by eight 
prancing ponies. 

Scene 4—Was a sunflowerland set for Juvenile 
Watson*and Gertrude Hayes, Jr., to win sev- 
eral encores, which they merited and didn’t 
take in order to permit that funny I'ttle 
Dutch comic, Johnny Webber, to do his ‘*hot- 
dog-man”’ bit for much laughter and applause. 

Julie De Cameron, the modernized type of 
burlesque prima, with her bobbed brunet hair, 
smiling face and slender form, sang in a cul- 
tured voice, accompanied by Messrs, White, 
Beck and Critchley. 

Scene 5—Was a satin drape for the “‘Irene,”’ 
“‘Mary,”” ‘Sally’? number that went over for 
numerous encores. 


Scene 6—Was an ovation from the andience 
on the appearance of ‘‘Bozo’’ Snyder in his 
own inimitable characterization, accompanied 
by Sam Green in the characterization formerly 
made famous by Edmund Hayes. What Green 
said and what ‘‘Bozo’’ did in a “put and take’’ 
telephone bit was a clever burlesque on the 
telephone companies which take your number and 
fail to put jit thro, and the audience caught 
the humor of the bit and applauded it up- 
roariously. ‘‘Bozo’s’’ whirlwind movements and 
facial registrations in humoring the many and 


varied situations were a study to the critical 
and a laugh a minute to the audience there to 
be amused. 

A baby carriage number, with babies crying 
for their bottle, supplied by a whisky-carrying 
cop, and the babies bilked by “Bozo,” was high- 
iy ludicrous, while the yocalistic numbers of 
the uniformed cops, nurses and babies was a 
novelty in number producing, 

Scene 7—Was a satin drape with a miniature 
stage in backgrownd for the posing of mod- 
elesque girls in a lingerie number interpreted by 
Prima De Cameron, 

Scene S—Was a drape for the authors in a 
song recital on ‘‘What Does the ‘‘Public Want,” 
with a burlesque by Dutch Comic Webber and 
a remarkable pantomime by “Bozo,” and it 
fully deserved the applause given it, 

Scene 9—Was a satin drape for an allegorical 
skit a la experience, and the individual girls 
taking part demonstrated the fact that they 
can read and deliver their lines like able artists. 
Their gowns of splendor caused many obs and 
ahs. Dutch Comic Webber, with a bottle of 
whisky representing prohibition, caused much 
laughter and applause at his burlesquing of 
this unpopular condition. “Bozo,” Gertrude 
Hayes, Jr., and Bob Tolliver, the colored “‘One- 
Man Jazz Band," closed the scene in a fitting 
manner. 


Scene 10—Was a practical auto for laughing 
purposes only, for Comic Chauffeur Webber 
finally found the gasoline leak with a lighted 
match that caused an erplosion that sent 
*‘Bozo’s” bead thru the roof of the car. 


Scene 11—Was a set for Gertrude Hayes, Jr., 
in a filmy costume that set off her shapely form 
to good advantage in a waltz number accom- 
panied by the other principals supplemented by 
a hard shoe dance by Bob Tolliver that went 
over great. 

Scene 12—Was a church set with apparent 
realistic stained glass windows for a wedding 
scene, in which most of the principals took 
part and in which the choristers made an ex- 
ceptionally pretty picture in their wedding 
gowns, 

PART TWO 

Scene 1—Was a lobby set for Harry Watson 
to discourse on Barney Gerard's efforts to 
please the public with something different in 
burlesque. 


Scene 2—Was a miniature theater minus stage 
on the stage, with the regular stage as a stage 
for the performers, and herein we found some- 
thing altogether different from anything here- 
tofore seen in burlesque. The three principal 
performers in the audience were ‘Bozo,"’ Sam 
Green and a comedienne whose name we didn’t 
get, but who will probably be programmed in 
the near future as a principal who can not be 
ignored a8 a comedienne, and what they one 
and all did in this new, novel and unique pres- 
entation of burlesque will make history for 
clean and clever comedy of the altogether-dif- 
erent kind, and jf there were any in the audi- 


fj 


Y iY  f 
Y Wf, 


STOCK 
COM- 
PANIES 


ence who dig not laugh uproariously it was be- 
cause they were deaf, dumb and blind. 
Scene 3—Was a drop for a funny patter by 
Sam Green and a trombone specialty by ‘‘Bozo” 
that could have he'd up the show indefinitely. 
Scene 4—Was another drape with platform 
in background for Prima De Cameron to in- 
troduce several remarkable poses by selected 
girls in portraying famous paintings and art 
in sculpture. 

‘Scene 5—Was a drop for Soubret Dix to 
prove title to the ‘“‘gingery girl” in a dance 

t places her in a class by herself. 

cene 6—Was a corridor in a hotel with 
Datch Comie Webber as the proprietor and 
“ozo” as the comedy-making guest, and he 
fe did make comedy. “Bozo's'' ‘‘Humpty 
Logan” number with the girls following the 
leader was a scream that was only excelled 
by his wrestling bout with Precocious Kiddie 
Sam Green, which caused an uproar of con- 
tinuous laughter and applause at their funny 
antics on the mat and a corking good burlesque 
on wrestlers jn general. 

Scene 7—Was a drop for Matty White and 


Morton Beck in a vocalistic specialty that 
was al] to the good. 
Scene 8—Was the ‘‘Midnight Frolic’ a la 


Ziegfeld and a closing to a most remarkable 
show, in which drama, comedy, opera and bur 
lesque biended harmoniously. 

COMMENT 

Granted that Barney Gerard is an author of 
exceptional ability, likewise @ showman with 
the money to finance a stupendous production 
in scenery, lighting effects, gowning and cos- 
tuming altogether different from anything here- 
tofore seen in burlesque, he has gone a step 
further in selecting a company of exceptional 
talent and ability to present what he has pro- 
duced, and in this he has had the assistance of 
Bert Grant with the music, which is unusual 
for burlesque, and the same is applicable to 
the dances by Seymour Felix. But the big 
outstanding feature of the entire presentation 
is the extraordinary characterization of ‘‘Bozo” 
by Tommy Snyder, the master mind of pan- 
tomime. 

We have seen “Bozo” before and always 
looked upon him as a type inimitable in a 
characterization that called for nothing but 
silent pantomimic work, but in the theater 
audience burlesque, under the penetrating 
rays of the floodlight, he was revealed 
to uS aS an actor of extraordinary intelligence, 
for the merry twinkle in his eyes, his facial 
registration of the humor within and his whirl- 
wind movements, each and every one a laugh 
within itself, convince ug beyond all reason- 
able doubt that the day is not far distant when 
“Bozo”? will take his proper place among the 
electric-lighted stars of Broadway. 

We have also seen Sam Green in other shows 
and if we are right in our recollections he 
has heretofore enacted straight roles, which 
makes jt all the more remarkable that he can 
and does characterize the role formerly played 
by Edmund Hayes in a manner that leaves 
nothing to be desired. 

Verily, Barney Gerard had fulfilled all the 
promises of his advance agent, Harry Berg, 
in claiming that ‘The Follies of the Day” is 
a show that will make burlesque history a8 
something new, novel and unique.—NELSB. 


“PELL MELL” 


“PPLL MELL’—A Burlesque Booking Office 
Circuit attraction, presented by Harry 
Strouse at the Star Theater, Brooklyn, N. 
Y., week of March 6, 


THE CAST—Bil'y Kelly, 
Chick Griffin, Frank Maliahan, Lew Howerd, 
James Kelly, Mae Clarke, Mabel White & 
Buster Sanborn. a" 

PART ONE 

Scene 1—Was a realistic railroad station for 
blackface colored porter Chick Griffin and uni- 
formed train cryer Lew Howard to herald 
trains to the feminine ensemble of twenty-two 
attractive choristers, 

Mabel White, a elender, stately brunet 
prima; Mae Clarke, a sbapely brunet ingenue; 
Buster Sanborn, a pretty, ever smiling, viva- 


Chas. Country, 


WELDON WILLIAMS &LICK 


TWO COLOR 


TICKETS 


- FORT SMITH,AR 


‘a 
f 46 ee 7 a 
~ — Y — 
, Wf fifi fp 
Yi ] Wy - WM!!!’ 
ee : 
ae 
_ 
Sr Oe EE EE ET 
i Pgs Ka 
ze, —_ 
. 
| tient : _ a 
SS 
a —— 
- BP 
il eS ——s 
ike es! ~ 
Sa iM > 
_—— _ 
ee 
(a 
| ————_—_—_————— ST 
| | 
ee K. 
ee 
ly 
La ; 
. — - — { 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


clous, slender soubret, and Jimmie Kelly, @ 
natty, clean-cut juvenile straight, put over 
their respective song numbers in good voice, 
while Chick Griffin made good in song and 
dance. 


Frank Mallahan, a well-built, manly appear- | 


ing chap, bandled the straight role in an able 
manner, 

The comedy started off with Prima White 
seeking a lost dog, with Blackface Griffin tell- 
ing her how to find it. 

Comics Billy Kelly, a likable but over dirty 
tramp, and Charles Country, a grotesque ap- 
pearing Dutch, came on for numerous funny 
falls, all over the stage, which heralded their 
later acrobatics, for they were manhandled by 
everyone in the company for much laughter 
and applause. 

Juvenile Kelly's three-times-three-are-ten 
Chinese Orchids was well worked by the 
comics and Prima White. Ingenue Clarke, go- 
ing mad at the mention of her home town, 
Williamsburg, manhandled the comics for many 
falls, and she in turn fell for wise-cracking 
Juvenile Kelly to applause, 

Comic Kelly and Soubret Sanborn, in a bench 
session cat fight got another round of laughter 
and applause. Ingenue Clarke and the East 
side feminine boys and girls went over great 
in their “Peggy O'Neil’’ number. Comics 
Kelly and Country, trying to get arrested by 
the insult bit to Soubret Sanborn by the 
“couldn't be annoyed’’ uniformed cop, Lew 
Howard, was also a funny bit. 

Juvenile Kelly, in a song number, accome 
panied by Soubret Sanborn on stage, Straight 
Mallahan in box and Charactermaan Howard in 
balcony, went over great. 

Scene 2—Was a drop for Chick Griffin, in 
tight-fitting attire, to do a really worthwhile 
song and dance made funny by the removable 
bat brim that dis¢losed what appeared to be a 
peculiar shaped hat to be a high top wig. 

Straight Mallahan’s gambling bit, with the 
comics on ‘‘No, I haven't’’, was well bur- 
lesqued by Comic Kelly. 

Scene 3—Was an elaborate garden set for 
Ingenue Clarke to display a great flash of form 
in black tights im her song number. Comic 
Kelly's recitation on ‘‘When I was born”, fol- 
lowed by Comic Country's suicide bit, was a 
laugh-getter. 

Soubret Sanborn made a pretty picture in 
crinoline gown in song while the chorister ap- 
peared equally attractive as Quakeress in a 
high-kicking, modern dance. Straight Malla- 
han, in a Dr. Jeckyl and Mr. Hyde burlesque, 
was ably assisted by Comic Kelly, who bur- 
lesqued the able dramatic acting of Straight 
Mallaban. 

Ingenue Clarke, in a cake-walk number, ac- 
companied by the girls, led up to the finale. 

PART TWO 

Scene 1—Was a roof garden set of splendor 
set off by the electric lighted buildings in the 
background. Prima White, Ingenue Clarke and 
Soubret Sanborn put over their respective song 
numbers in good voice. 

Straight Mallahan, conspiring with Ingenue 
Clarke and Soubret Sanborn to impersonate 
the “Levender Girl” in gypirg the comeon 
comics, introduced an auburn-haired girl from 
the chorus who worked the part well. Prima 
White made a great flash in white ftizhts, 
while the chor'sters did a pedestal-posing act 
that was a novelty. 

Straight Mallahan, rehearsing the comics in 
meeting Ingenue Clarke, a dope patiering 
mystifier, was well burlesqued by Comic Coun- 
try. Blackface Griffin and the comics worked 
the bomb bit along the lines of the stolen 
papers for laughter and applause. Straight 
Mallahan and Prima White in a table bit wth 
Menu-singing Waiter Griffin brought on Jimmie 
Kelly as a grotesque messenger boy and the 
comics as staggering acrobatic drunks for a 
big hand. 

Ingenue Clarke in a singing number gave 
ample opportunity to the gris in a pick-out 
number to demonstrate their vocalism, and 
among those selected were: Helen Thompson, 
followed by a black haired = girl whose 
hame we didn’t catch, Babe «© Williams, 
Margaret O'iver, Ella Welle, a cute little 
bobbed-hair brunet; two little Spanish sisters, 
and another cute little bobbed-hair brunet, Miss 
McDermott; and let it be said here that sev- 
eral of them are eligible to principal roles. 

Comie Kelly, Blackface Griffin, Juvenile Kel- 
ly in grotesque makeup, and Characterman 
Howard in real burlesque makeup and manner- 
ism as the Wandering Minstrels with banjo, 
flute, guitar, washboard banjo and washtub 
violin, was a scream, for they really harmon- 
ized in their comedy {nstrumentalism, 

Producer Harry Strouse, accompanied by his 
dignity and walking stick, came to the front 
‘o boost “Jimmie Cooper's Beauty Revue” as 
iext week's attraction and then invite all those 
Present to come again Thursday night for a 
“Garter Contest,” likewise to announce that 
by special request the Wandering Minstrels 
would play the “National Anthem” and as the 
audience arose to their feet the “Wandering 
Minstrels’? broke forth with ‘How Dry I Am” 
to the laughter and applause ef the standees. 


MUSIC MADE EASY 


Best book ever published. Shows how the notes 
can be learned in 5 minutes. How to play beau- 
tiful chords. want to know. 
7 t upon receipt of 50c. MACDONALD, 2828 
V. Marison St.. Chicago, Ilinots. 


| rate cleteaiatalataatalatatiat ey 


SPEC 


$50.00 Spotlights for $25.00 


To advertise our 1922 Model we will sell a lim- 
ited number at the cost of manufacture, exactly as 
illustrated. These Spotlights are used with the G. 
40 1,000-Watt or 500-Watt Nitrogen Lamps and are 
built to stand rough use, with Front and Back of 
Aluminum, body of polished steel, well ventilated, 
grooves to take all standard makes of effects, color 
frames or Iris shutter. 
make, regulation telescopic stand, improved focus- 
ing device, asbestos leading wires and 15-amp. 
stage connector. 


market. 


ee, * 


Footlight Baby Spots (Focusing) and Adjustable 
Legs for tilting, $10.00 each. Store Window Spots 
with Bracket, knuckle joint, tilting and swivel de- 
vice, $12.00 each. Condensers, 4%4-in. at 75c.; 5-in. 
at $1.25; 6-in., 
light Spotlights, 25, 35, 50, 70 and 100-Ampere. Full 
line of Stage Lighting Effects and General Acces- 
sories at bargain prices. To insure yourself against 
bankruptcy, buy from headquarters! 


CHARLES NEWTON 


305 West 15th St., ° e ° 
Telephone, 2171 Chelsea 


SERRE SSR 


Lens 5 in. diam., French 


The best Nitrogen Spot on the 


at $2.00, and 8-in., at $5.00. Arc- 


NEW YORK, 


Cross Eyes Straightened 


by simple method. Over 3,000 cures on record. Write for Book and Pictures 


of this wonderful cure. 


“IT IS FREE.” 


FRANKLIN 0. CARTER, M. D. 


Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 


120 S. State Street, 


References from people in your profession, 


CHICAGO, ILL. 
25 years on State Street. 


210 W. 44th St. NEW YORK. 
ey veers rece 


LOR TRVNKS 


28 E. Randolph @t.,, CHICAGO. 


A PSSA (eS ER SS 
WANTED FOR MEDICINE SHOW 


A-No, 1 Sketch Team, 
ane given preference. 
arch 6; Neilisville, Wis., weck March 12, 


change singles and doubles for week; Novelty Man, change for week. Those pla 
Other useful people write or wire quick to ROY WHORRALL, Galesville, Wis, ie | 


COMMENT 

The scenery up to the standard. Gowns and 
costumes up to the average. The company 
lanch-evoking entertainers with old but clean 
and cleverly-worked comedy. 

The choristers, for the most part young and 
very attractive, did the best they could with 
the numbers given them by Solly Fields, who 
eftered something new, novel and unique in 
dances and ersembles and which will probably 
£0 over creat after the chorus gets away from 
the stereotyped dances and ensembles that they 
have been doing week ofter week in the same 
show. ‘Vith Mr. Fields as a producer of dances 
and ensembles the girls will be given ample 
opportunity to demonstrate their individual 
talent in grasping his intent and purpose, and 
if they fa*} there are others more familiar 
with stock burlesque to replace them and suc- 
ceed. Personally, we are of the opinion that 
the girls are the thing in burlesque, but, 
judging from what we saw of the show Mon- 
day we opine that sixteen can do far better 
work than twenty-two on the stage of the 
Star, for they were so crowded that they could 
no work as well as they probably would had 
there been fewer girls on the stage.—NELSE, 


SEEN AND HEARD 

Pugilist Harry Wills, who recently won a 
decision over Kid Norfolk at the Madison Square 
Garden, New York City, is negotiating with Dr. 
Lothrop, of the Howard, Boston, for an engage- 
ment there, and ‘tis said that the Burlesque 
Booking Office is negotiating with Wills for his 
appearance at its theaters—the Star, Brook- 
lyn; Gayety, Baltimore, and the Capitol, Wash- 
ington. 

Pugilist Jack Johnson has had his boring 
license restored by the Boxing Commissioner of 
the State of New York, which will enable Jack 
to make that vaudeville act that he is preparing 
to produce a stronger attraction, 

Fred Follette has exited from New York City 
for Mobile, Ala., where he will assume his duties 
as treasurer of the World at Home Shows, 

Jovial Charlie Fox, manager of the Gayety 
Theater, Milwaukee, Wis., was a Columbia 
Corner visitor for several days during the past 
week, and exited on Wednesday for ‘*Home, 
Sweet Home” without something that was swiped 
from his grip by the Columbia Corner hounds. 

Dave Hamlin, formerly manager of Joe Wil- 
ton’s “TIurly Burly’”? show, on the American 
Circuit, departed from New York City on Wednes- 
day for Chicago, where there aren’t so many 
co-operative company managers seeking engage- 
ments, 

Harry (Hello, Jake) Fields has been engaged 
by Gallagher & Bernstein as featured comic in 


“Little Bo-Peep” at the Lafayette Theater, New 
York, for the week of March 13, with probably 
more time to follow, or it may be that Fields 
will open with the Howard Stock, Boston, on 
April 3, accompanied by friend wife, Dixie 
Mason, as soubret, for a summer run, Dolph 
Singer will produce the opening show at the 
Howard, 

March 11 saw the closing of Sandusky, Elyria 
and Lorain, 0., as American Circuit cities, and 
the ‘‘French Frolics,’’ an EB, Thos. Beatty show, 
as an American Circuit attraction at Scranton, 
the show having played the entire circuit, 

Juanita Valadge, formerly of the “Garden of 
Frolics,"*” has a communication at the New York 
office of The Billboard awaiting her. 

Charles (K‘d) Koster, formerly ahead of 
Rube Bernstein's shows, communicates that he 
bas recovered from his recent illness and will 
soon arrive at Columbia -Corner in connection 
with business of a circus with which he will 
be associated this season. 

Leon De Voe has signed up with the National 
Musical Comedy Stock at Detroit, to open 
March 20, 

Mark Mason, the critical outspoken editor of The 
Philadelphia Sunday Transcript, evidently didn’t 
think much of “Cuddle Up” at the Casino, but 
in his review he did say ‘Yoo Hoo’”’ gave Shirley 
Mallette the chance of her young life and she 
made the most of it. She scored solidly with 
“Strut, Miss Lizzie,”’ which is proof conclusive 
that Shirley must have put it over. From the 
American to the Columbia Circuit is the aspira- 
tion of all soubrets, and we for one are glad 
to note that Shirley has made good on the 
Columbia, 

Billy (Grogan) Spencer has been signed “1p by 
Ike Weber for Minsky Bros.’ National Winter 
Garden Stock, to open March 13. 

Richard Carle has been engaged by I. H. Herk 
for one of his shows on the new Shubert Vaude- 
ville Unit Circuit for next season. 

I. B. Hamp, who was producing and doing 
principal comic in ‘‘Mile-a-Minute’’ show at the 
Bijou Theater last week, was suddenly called 
home to Waycross, Ga., due to the death of his 
mother. 

‘When Charlie Robinson’s “Parisian Flirts” 
was laying off at Louisville, Ky., the manage- 
ment of the Ben Ali Theater engaged the com- 
pany to put on the entire first act as a fifty- 
minute vandeville show at the Ben Ali at a 
$1.50 top to turnaway business, 

Pauline Harer, who worked opposite Jack 
Conway in burlesque, has been engaged by Harry 
Strouse to replace Mae Clarke as ingenue in 
‘Pell Mell’ on the Burlesque Booking Office 
Circuit. 


SUT . 
ay ; 2 tr % 

JACK MILLS, Inc. 
MUSIC PUBLISHERS | 
152 West 45th Street 

NEW YORK CITY 


= 


i 


_ 
— 
—_ 
— 
- 
— 
— 
—_ 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
_ 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
_ 
— 
a 
— 
— 
_ 
— 
_ 
—_ 
— 
_ 
— 
= 
= 
— 
— 
— 
_ 
_— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
_ 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
— 
—_ 
_— 
— 
—_ 
a 
a 
— 
— 


ASV ESEEEE bad 


SUGGESTS | 


“DEAR WD 
THLAND! 


% 
for Vaudeville and Concert. 
Singers, Quartets, Chautau- 
qua Artists, Orchestras, Etc. 


TITTLE 


ANY MATERIAL 
YOU MAY DESIRE 
FOR THIS PURPOSE 
WILL BE SENT . 
ON REQUEST. 


TITINTTT 


-t 
oa | 


You N eedn’t 
Tell the Secret 


Restore your graying hair with Mary T. 
Goldman’s Hair Color Restorer and no one 
will ever know. 
No_ streaks or 
freakish discolora- 
tion, nothing to 
wash or rub off. 
The restored color 
is even and per- 
fectly natural in 
all lights, 

Mail coupon to- 
day for free trial 
bottle and test on 
@ single lock. Be 
sure to state ex- 
actly the color of 


your hair. 
close a lock if 
possible. When 


: convinced by won- 
derful results, get a full-sized bottle at drug- 
gist or direct. 


ee ee re eee 
1 Mary T. Goldman, 
1433 Goldman Bldg., st. Paul, Ming. 


Please send me your FRED trial bottle 
of Mary T. Goldman's Hair Color Restorer. 
The natural color of my hair is 

black...... jet black...... dark brown 


f= medium brown...... light brown...... 


' 
eereee 


Name SOCCER EERE HEHEHE EEE EEE SEH EEE 


gs Address eeetere eee eee eeeereseres 
at cat wee © a es 2 es 2 ee ee 


| PHOTOGRAPHS 
8x10, 1Oc each ordering 100 


Also $8.50 per 100. 25 for $3.00. Double weicht 
fro . TALS—50, $1.75; 100. $3.00. 
SLIDES, $1.80 per Dozen. Send P. M. © 
Twenty-Four-Hour Service. MOTION PICTURE 
PRODUCTS, 3258 Harrison St.. Chicago. 


Gas comm oom som ne: os 


$1,850.00 IN CASH PRIZES 


Short Stories ana 
One Act Plays Wanted 


See THE BLACK CAT at 
mewsdealers, or send 15a, tor now (eave to G. 6. Geek 


Hill, Highland Falls, New 


| ee 47 fa 
SERRE RSeReReeeee 
a / a = : | 
_ , Fa _ = 
— | / =] 
a : | 
OS ied $e eey i = —— 
E + mi = 
a ‘ a = - 
| a = 
m I : 
ml : Bi 7 
a g 
4 a: = 7 ; | 
- - 
=] mY 
ee : 
LJ ; & ae ' 
Gi Bg . 
= ' = mm | 
tal oi oe 
il i Z 
= | alli | 
| Ge Lh --F an | 
Po FP = : 
ee = ; 
ES =n a 
_ Ar eT STS ERE PS EE oe 
i 
ee 
ee 


sa aes hae 


eee 


es 


eee ES 


ee 


tS a toe 


Ve 


48 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


ODS) 
(Communications to Qur Cincinnati Offices) 


WHO GREASED THE SKIDS? 


By FRED FRAZER 


“a 
Y ULI 


Miss 


Grappling with the tabloid situation during 
the past twelve months or so has been some- 
what of a perilous occupation for whoever dared 
to put his or her idea in writing. Criticism on 
the subject, however well meant, was and 
is bound to bring heated retaliation from either 
one or all three of its cardinal points, viz.: 
Booking Office, Owner and House Manager. 
Therefore to tackle the subject safely re- 
quires the patience of Job, the wisdom of 
Solomon and the foresight of Charles Evans 
Hughes. The writer lays no claim to any one 
of the above gifts, and only asks that all in 
the game accept this article in the spirit in 
which it is written—SINCERITY—with a 
whole-hearted desire to lift tabloid out of the 
rut. 

From the numerous letters which have reached 
me the heart of the subject seems to be “Who 
greased the tabloid skids and how can the down- 
ward rush be checked?" False promises have 
created a multitude of tabloid sins and can 
be held responsible fos helping build the tobog- 
gan. The office says: ‘‘We can offer you such 
and such a rotte.”” The owner says: “I have 
such and such a show, etc.”” A newly formed 
and well-meant organization was intended to 
remedy all that.- Did it? Candidly no! Why 
not? Well, the abnormal business depression 
throout the country delivered it a stunning 
blow. BUT IT PROMISED TOO MUCH. Let 
me illustrate how rapidly deterioration sets 
in thru false promises. One spends hundreds 
of dollars on a real show, new scenery, A-1 
wardrobe and good people. A route is prom- 
ised and all seems well. A week or so later 
the route is changed, jumps get bigger and it 
is often Friday or Saturday before next week's 
address comes along, a few lavoffs and then 
the inevitable sets in—dissatisfaction. Thé 
people leave and the show becomes a wreck. 
The majority of tabloid houses play shows 
week after week, so it ought to be possible 
toute a show well in advance. 

The success of a prominent wheel and its 


. 


SUUUUTP TOE POE ee 


JACK MILLS, Inc. 
MUSIC PUBLISHERS 

152 West 45th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 


rx > 


SUGGESTS 


TEAR OL 
SOUTHLAND’ 


for Vaudeville and Concert 
| Singers, Quartets, Chautau- 
qua Artists, Orchestras, Etc. 


2 


ANY MATERIAL 
YOU MAY DESIRE 
FOR THIS PURPOSE 
WILL BE SENT 
ON REQUEST. 


VT ee 


SMT 


TTL 


re 


RELIABILITY IS THE OUTSTANDING FEATURE OF OUR SERVICE. 


HYATT’S BOOKING EXCHANGE 


36 WEST RANDOLPH 


STREET. CHICAGO. 


mediately. 


New Regent Theatre Building, 


NOTICE —TABLOID OWNERS! 


If you have a show putting on clean script bills, carry special scenery 

for at least three changes, plenty of first-class wardrobe and have Vaude- 

ville Specialties in each bill, we can give you plenty of time, to start im- 

Advise where our representative can see your show. 
WIRE—W RITE—PHONE 


GUS SUN BOOKING EXCHANGE CO. 


SPRINGFIELD, OHIO. 


preference. 
be ladies or gents at all times. 


WANTED | 
MUSICIANS AND VAUDEVILLE ACTS 


(UNDER CANVAS) 

Acts who are able to play in orchestra or band or sing in quartette given 
Would consider a good Illusion or Mind Reading Act. Must 

Will start about May Ist. 
J. C. WADLINGTON, Shelbyville, Ky. 


Write 


H. R. Seeman--Wants For His “Oh You Wildcat” 
Overseas Soldier Show with Clyde “Rube” Hooper. 


bered 300."" 
Man for Juvenilee, not Jess than 5 ft, 10 inches. young, good singing voice for specialties, All script. Strong- “4 


est cast in America for popular prices. Would-be actors, save stamps, 
All summer work. 


booked solid. Week to 4-week stands. 
TEAM CONSIDERED, 
WITH THIS SHOW. 

Palace Theatre, Salina, Kansas, week 20th 


Consider first-class Producer with modern scripts. 
Salary no question to richt people. 
See further route in “Billyboy 


Salary in keeping with ability, Show 
Must be meat ker and dresser on and off. NO 
abbed to one hour. NO CHORUS 
Midiand Theatre, Hutchinson, Kansas, week (3th; 


SHOWMEN’S PHOTO STUDIO 


REPRODUCTIONS FROM ANY PICTURE. 


Lobby 
Pos 
UNSURPASSED FINISH. 


LEO WASSER, 1629 Green Street, - 


« WANTED, CHARACTER WOMAN and SOUBRETTE 


Display, 8X10.............+seeeeeeeeseeeee++- $3.00 for 12; $20.00 per 100 


Cee oerccccccccrsercccecccccscccccccesscesss $100 for 12; 


$6.00 per 100 
Delivery within 5 days. 


- Philadelphia, Pa. 


for MARY BROWN’S TROPICAL MAIDS 


Princess Theatre, Oil City, Pa., 
ED 
WANTED FOR PERMANENT STOCK—TO JOIN ON WIRE 


Two experienced Stock Chorus Girls who lead numbers. 
tone m harmony trio, Straight Man that can sing top tenor in 
MANAGER JOHNSON’S MUSICAL 


March 13th to 25th. 


e 


Other useful people write. 
REVUE, Star Theatre, Louisville, Ky. 


Producing Comedian that can lead or sing 
harmony trio. 


Trio and Quartette Singing. 
State all 


WANTED AT ONCE — Gentleman Medicine Show Performer. 
Must do good Singing Specialties, Second Comedy and Straight in acts. 
Do not answer unless qualified. 
first letter eS 5 ee oe HS oe ee 


Change for two weeks I feature 
— Preference given to one who fakes piano 
ire. 


ARMOND, Quaker Medicine Co.. Eldorade. Wis. 


rapid growth is sufficient proof that open- 
handed methods between owner and agency 
bring their own reward. The owner, in a con- 
versation with the writer a few weeks ago, 
said: “‘My houses guarantee the work, 1 the 
contracts and time. and the owner his show, 
and, therefore, all three of us are satisfield. 
Otherwise what inducement has a manager to 
take out a show with no guarantee of consecu- 
tive work and only week-to-week bookings?’’ 
This brought to my mind an ad about shows 
at prewar prices, and I would respectfully ask: 
“Can you live today on the prewar basis?’’ 

The producer gets his measure of censure 
also, and probably deserves a whole lot of it. 
But (and it’s a big but) prove to him that he'll 
get a fair return for his outlay and you place 
him in a position where it won't be necessary 
to search the highways and byways for the 
cheapest people he can find. 

Several very excellent tab. folks have laid 
the decline to such things as ‘same old bits,’’ 
“third-rate scenery,” ‘dirty wardrobe’ and 
the ‘‘we’re-in-town’’ artists. Quite right! 
But they're all offsprings of CHEAPNESS. 
Smut is also another culprit for which there 
is no excuse. Now, then, let us sum the case 
up to try to justify the heading of this article. 
A person who thinks he sees the faults should 
naturally be able to suggest some remedy. 
So let me submit a triangle conversation as a 
possible solution: ‘‘The producer to the agent: 
‘If I put out a real show what will you pay 
for it?’ Agent to house manager: ‘If I can sup- 
ply you with real shows what will you pay fm 
them?” House manager tc both agent and 
producer: ‘If I am willing to pay for them, 
can I rely on both of you?” The answer lies 
in the answer. 


HARDAWAY-MORAN’S COMEDIANS are 
said to be offering a program well worthy of 
the splendid business they are doing in Ok- 
lahoma cities, 

THE “THAYER & SACK REVUE” played a 
return engagement at the Empire Theater, 
Glens Falls, N. Y¥., week of March 6 “A 
Trip to India’’ was presented the first half, and 
“Izzy in the Graveyard”’ the second half. 

THE 1921-'22 SEASON of Eddie Lester's ‘‘Van- 
ity Girls’ Review’? was brought to a close 
March 9 at Stearns, Ky. The show carried 


company was headed by William Ritchie, ‘‘The 
Original Alabama Sunflower", who is said to 
have signed a contract with the Sbuberts for 
a vaudeville tour next season, 

JULIA AND COTTON STOREY are playing 
vaudeville dates in the “sticks’’ of West Vir- 
ginia. They were, until it recently closed, 
with Thos, Aiton’s “Girl From Broadway" 
Company playing that territory. 

“HAPPY SLIM” STACEY, until recently 
with a stock company in Picher, &., is pro- 
ducing at the Idie Hour Theater, Kansas City. 
The roster also lists the names of Miss Lee, 
prima donna; F'orine Burns, comic; Harry 
Beasley, straight; Frankie Ralston, dancer; 
Keystone and Kennedy, Harmony Boys; 
Joe Rider, pianist, and a beauty chorus. Phil 
Ph'llips, of the London Theatrical Exchange, 
Kansas City, is business manager. 

IT WAS ERRONEOUSLY STATED in last 
week's issue that Johnnie and Gladys Snecd 
had replaced the Schniffers with ‘“Zarrow's 
Yanks,” playing the Empress Theater, Cincin- 
nati, but they will not open with the Zarrow 
show until March 15 at Bowling Green, Ky. 

FRANK KING, of King's “Dainty Girls,” ts 
very il] at the Baptist Hospital, Garrison and 
Franklin avenues, St. Louis, Mo., and invites 
friends to write. 

“THE ROSERUD GIRLS,” Jack Wrtlie, 
manager, are reported successful] under canvas 
in the oil fields of Louisiana and Arkansas. 
Mr. Wylie, who has the leading comedy roles, 
is said to be a natural fun maker. Supporting 
him are: Hy Heath, comedy and characters; 
C. H. Pulian, straight man; Alice Wood, prima 
donna; Helen B'rchwell, soubret; Jean Green- 
wall, characters; Gregore Niiando, pianist, and 
a chorus of six. J. N, Nugent is advance 
agent. 

DAVE BURT, after six months as feature 
comedian with the Milton Schuster Company, 
is leaving to rejoin Mary Brown's “Tropical 
Maids." He takes with him the good will 
of every member of the company. In writing 
of his closing, Burt says: “I've enjoyed every 
day of my six months on this show and I wich 
every member of the company the very best of 
luck, and that goes double for B. (Bob) W. 
Robinson, the genial manager. It’s an honor 
to work with and for a manager who is 
such a regular fellow.” 


doubl . Wi 
twelve people and its own orchestra. The IT WAS RECENTLY brought to the atten- S$. Winchestet P-0g 


tion of the employees of the Atlanta Theater, 
Atlanta, Ga., that Carl Neal was very sick at 
Chilis’ Hote!, Atlanta, having been stranded 
there after his show, “Neal's Persian Dolls,” 
had been disorganized. Neal's trouble is con- 
gestion of the lungs, and having bis wife and 
young aby there without funds to pay his 
hotel bills or get home be appealed for help, 
which was forthcoming from the employees 
of the Atlanta Theater, who raised $50 among 
them. Since then they have moved to a more 
quiet place until Mr. Neal’s health improves, 

WITH THE DEPARTURE of the Empress 
Players after a 20 weeks’ engagement, the 
Bobby Parker Musical Stock Company returned 
to the Empress Theater, Lansing, Mich., Sun- 
day, March 5. The company opened before 
capacity houses, presenting ‘“‘The Three Hus- 
bands.’’ There is a good chorus and the com- 
pany is capable. It includes the Steinway 
Trio with singing above the average. Katherine 
Miller is a comedienne of ability and Margaret 
Sprague is featured as a musician. The com- 
pany is here for an indefinite engagement with 
semi-weekly changes. A daily matinee and 
one evening show are given daily. 

“IT GIVES ME GREAT PLEASURE,” writes 
a Billboard reader (name withbeld by request) 
of Hoosick Falls, N. Y., “to recommend the 
Bob Ott Company, which has p!ayed this town 
for several seasons. A great number of friends 
here wish Bob and his members success. The 
company includes some of the finest people 
on the road today, both in business dealings 
and on the stage. While in town during the 
week of February 27 Bob, as he is known here 
by everyone, organized what is known as the 
‘Shifters’ organization, and when he finished 
his week's engagement the membership num- 


MACK & RAMSRY’S “Vanity Revue,” 
with the ‘Sunkist Peaches,"’ has just been 
organized in Kansas City. The principals in- 
clude Anne Greene, prima donna; Edd'e DeLoy, 
comedian; Richard Ryan, straight man; Irene 
Mae Boyce, ingenue; Babe Bradley, soubret; 
Carl Stevens, juvenile; Oscar Martin, second 
comedian; Meta Wright, musical directress. 
The opening date is set for March 20. Mr. 
Mack has been in Kansas City the past two 
weeks engaging people and superintending the 
rehearsals and says he is fully satisfied with 


JAMES MADISON'S 
WEEKLY SERVIC 


Registers my definite purpose to provide 
successful performers with a high stand- 
ard of new, nifty laughs—and all abso- 
lutely original. Each issue contains & 


really funny monologue, double routines, 
parody, gags. wise 
DISON’S WEEK- 


-minute 


laughs—and 
Terms are: 
ONE YEAR, (52 ISSUES).........$50 
3 MOS., (13 ISSUES).......-0.---$15 
SINGLE COPIES ...cccccseseeeeeeeesd 2 


My suggestion is that you start with a 
3 months’ trial subscription beginning with 
No. 1 so you can keep a complete file. 
Or I wil! send any 2 issues for $3; any 
3 for $4: or the first 6 for $7. 


JAMES MADISON 
1493 Broadway, New York. 


Why, yes, certainly, I write all kinds of 
acts to order. 


——— SS 


POSTER PRINTING 
Prices Reduced Again! 


Effective March 1, we will put into effect 
further reductions in prices of all classes of 
poster printing. This will be the fourth re- 
uction in twelve months. Write for new list. 
We don’t claim to be the cheapest printers on 
earth, but you will not find another house 1» 
the United States which will do all your print 
ing from a dodger to a 24-sheet stand and ~~ 
Dang-up service for any less money 
te Give a a chance to prove this assertion. 


HERALD POSTER CO. 
COLLINSVILLE, ILLINOIS 


IMMEDIATE OPEN TIME for good Tabloid Musi’ 
Comedies 10 le, We offer one, two and turer 
weeks’ work. vrite or wire your lowest salary am 
open time. Shows going East and West break 3 
jumps. Independent booking. No commissions HIP- 
ODROME THEATRE. Charleston, West Virginia. 


CHORUS GIRLS WANTED 


Immectiately ter wewor. pewoy StAis C8. = 
fag Sun Circuit. "se who wrote e in, 
mall was lost. Write or wire GEO. W. STEPHENS, 
Grand Theatre, Huntington, W. Va. 


WANTED, Piano-A cordionist 


For big- act. State your experience. If you 
I ny call. GUY U. LAUREN. 41° 


7 Fs 
eee eee ee, 
emer a nna r e___ 
WMAMLLLLLOMLLLL YLLMLULLLALUtE i a 
| {nn 
. L- ee 
ee 
H 
ee CQ 
on! SS 
, ) 
eh 
un 
= * 
it 
He 
1) 
spf 
) 
if 
; | 
a: 4 
: 
= = LY SERVICE is at once the highest 
= = priced and most economical SERVICE in 
= = the word. For every dollar you pay 
| 4 a — ersten me, you will get a hundred back in extra 
am = 5 a 
| = = = ee 
= =: 
= s = Pe 
| ee 
“*) = = 
> = = 
; by : Py = 
= 
| ," 
Be Po 
fF EEE — 
_: 
| Chicago, 
| & 
\ 
4 


MARCH 18, 1922 . 


The Billboard 


the outlook and his clever little set of people. 
This is a 100 per cent Equity show. Ed F. 
Feist is booking. 

“THE KENTUCKY BELLES,” advises Own- 
er Chas. Morton, ‘‘after an absence of one 
year from the South, are working for Joe 
Spiegelberg and renewing old acquaintances all 
along the route. Business on this circuit is 
exceptionally good and there is a great field 
down here now for shows that carry specialties, 
We are presenting all new bills this season, 
and among the specialties offered are: Harry 
DeGrace, trapeze, wire, table and chair bal- 
ancer; Billy Mack, acrobatic dancer and roller 
skater; the Three Gibson Sisters, piano, singers 
and dancers; Daisy DeGrace, ‘blues’ singer; 
Eddie Trout, buck dancer; Ebba Eckman, 
wooden shoe dancer, and the Cunard Sisters, 
harmony singers. Special scenery is used for 
each bill.’’ 

SCRIPT BILLS that are strictly moral, re- 
fined and up to date are the kind being pre- 
sented by Tom Attaway'’s “Black-Eyed Beau- 
ties’ Company, which is now in its sixth week 
in Picher, Ok., with business increasing night- 
ly, according to Advertising Manager Jack 
Bitts, ‘Last week's receipts exceeded the pre- 
ceding week by $400," says Mr. Bitts. ‘Tom 
Attaway -will be here indefinitely under the 
management of J. D. Wrynian.’” The roster 
includes Tom Attaway, producer and principal 
comic; Jack B, Williams, Adila Berteen, Jack 
Bitts, Rosaline DeFrance, Shonnie Wa'ker, 
Josephus Thompson Weddell, principals; Rose 
Attaway, Marie Williams, Ruth Owens, Nellie 
Yoeman, Dolly DeVere, Babe Neff, Tilly Stock 
and Florence Vest, chorus. The “Forum Four," 
harmony singers, are said to be quite popular. 

AFTER AN ABSENCE of five years, George 
B. Gardner, well-known producer and player 
in the Southern tab. field, took his newest 
vehicle, ““‘The Jonteel Revue,"’ back to At- 
lanta, Ga., week of February 20, to the Bonita 
Theater. The success of the engagement re- 
sulted in holding over the revue for an ad- 
ditional week. Gardner, who is one of the 
most popular blackface comedians in Southern 
territory, is ably assisted this year by Ready 
Duran, in straights and general business; May 
Lawson, ingenue; the Musical Dews, in Ha- 
wailan numbers; the Hanna Triplets, and Ted- 
dy Witzgal, general business. The fire at 
Danville, Va., recently, in which Mr. Gardner, 
his wife and Ready Duran lost trunks and per- 
sonal property valued at nearly $5,000, has 
not affected the show in any department, as 
all wardrobe, scenery and other effects have 
been replaced, 


THE RENDON MUSICAL COMEDY COM- 
PANY, Bi'ly Rendon, manager, at the Hippo- 
drome Theater, Louisville, Ky., is said to have 
left the beaten path of stock tabloid in that 
city and instead of offering time-worn bits is 
pleasing large and appreciative audiences witb 
tea] honest-to-goodness script bills. That this 
class of entertainment is pleasing to the 
average theatergoer is proven by the fact that 
the Rendon organization has increased the 
weekly business of the “‘Hipp.”’ over 100 per 
cent since its opening more than five weeks 
ago, it is said. Manager Jablow, of the 
“Hipp.,”” is very much enthused with the 
show and is planning extensive alterations to 
the stage and auditorium. The members are: 
Billy Rendon, straight man and _ producer; 
Billy Allen, principal comedian; Hugh Whit- 
aker, second comic; Lee Solomon, general busi- 
ness; Lucille Whitaker, musical director; Betty 
Horn (producer), Peggy Stone, Nelly LaBlane, 
Virginia Stone and Lesta Paige, chorus. 

“BILLY WEHLE, owner and manager of 
“The Blue Grass Belles’, who have been play- 
ing at the Manhattan Theater, Bl Dorado, Ark., 
for the past twenty weeks, closed a deal with 
Jack Parsons whereby he became possessor of 
the Manhattan. Jack Parsons was the owner 
and lessee until March 4, on which date 
“Billy” purchased the theater lease and all 
equipment. Upon purchasing the theater Mr. 
Wehle started remodeling and has made many 
improvements dlready. Marshall Walker, who 
has been with the “Blue Grass Belles” for the 
past year, closed March 11 with his wife, 
Blanche, and left for Denison, Tex.,* their 
home, to spend their vacation, and will join 
the company later. Their place will be taken 
by Roy and Ricca Hughes, who have worked 
for “Billy’’ before. Joe Owens, musical di- 
Tector, joined the show recently. The theater 
now boasts of a five-piece orchestra. The 
policy of the Manhattan is two shows nightly, 


You Need It To Complete Your Music 


succeed from the very beginning. 
your knowledge and firmly fixes the important principles in your mind. 


HARMONY TEACHES YOU— 


t. To Analyze M thus enabling to determine the key of bid 

composition, a various hasmonio Progressions. 7” nes ’ 
2 
3. 


To Transpose at Sieht more easily accompaniments which you may be 5. 
called upon to play, 


To Harmonize Melodies correctly and arrange music for bands and 6. 


in which interested. 


Have You Studied Harmony? 


oo of harmony is absolutely essential to round out your musical education. It adds 
wonderfully to your equipment, both as Teacher and Performer. We offer you a complete 


course of weekly Harmony Lessons at small cost in the privacy of your own home. These lessons, prepared 
by Mr. Adolph Rosenbacker, famous Soloist and Conductor and pupil of Richter; and Dr. Daniel Proth- 
eroe, Eminent Composer, Choral Director and Teacher, can be secured only from us. 

Each lesson is an orderly step in advance, clear, thorough and correct; not the mere mechanical application of dry-as-dust 
rules, but an interesting, intelligent, thoroughly practical method that grips your attention and stimulates your ambition‘ to 
A written examination on each lesson, in connection with ample original work, develops 


To Detect Wrong Notes and faulty progressions 
music or during the performance of a composition. 


To Memorize Rapidly, one of the very greatest benefits derived from 
the study of Harmony. 


To Substitute Other Notes when for any reason the ones written 
stras, are inconvenient to play, 
Valuable Art Catalog sent free, contains full details of these Harmony Lessons; alsoour course in Piano (Students’ or 
Teachers’ Course) with Paderewshi's endorsement by the great Sherwood; Violin, Cornet, Mandolin, Guitar, Banjo, Pub- 
lic School Music, Choral Conducting, History, Advanced Composition, etc., by equally eminent teachers. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Write today. It costs you nothing—you have everything to gain and nothing to lose. State age and course 


An OUNCE of proof is wortha POUND of promise. We have a solid wall of proof from graduate students 


Deparemene cos” ~6UNIVERSITY EXTENSION CONSERVATORY 


Your Great O pportunity 


al Edueation —— 


whether in printed 


Chicago 
Illinois 


When Buying a Trunk Remember the 


MACK WIRE PLY 


THE ONLY TRUNK MADE WITH WIRE MESH, LAMINATED BE- 
TWEEN FOUR-PLY VENEER LUMBER, TWO-PLY FIBRE, 
ONE-PLY WIRE MESH, MAKING 


SEVEN-PLY TRUNK PUNCTURE PROOF 


Patented. They are made to stand the test of the baggage smasher. 
Wardrobes in all sizes, also regular Box Trunks from 32 in. to 42 in. 
Props. and Special Musical Trunks. 

We have on hand a few of the leading makes of Wardrobes and reg- 
ular Trunks taken in on exchange for Mack Wire Ply. For sale very 
reasonable. Write for description and prices. 


THE NEFF-WILLIAMS TRUNK CO., 


1376 W. THIRD ST., = - CLEVELAND, OHIO, 
PLUSH DROPS 


SCENERY *° torent 


Amelia Grain, Philadelphia 


Established 1890. Licensed and Bonded under the State Law of Pennsylvania. 


The One Place in the Wide, Wide World 


Where the professional as well as the amateur producer can rent a Drop, a Setting or the com- 
plete Scenic Production of any Play or Opera ever staged. 


First Part Minstrel Show Settings and Cycloramas 


im special designs, for all Fraternal Orders, 


Plush, Silk and Velour Hangingsin All Shades for Fashion 
Shows, Conventions and High-Class Musicales. 


ABSOLUTELY RELIABLE SERVICE! CATALOG FOR THE ASKING 


Mail, Wire and Long Distance Telenhone Address: 


Amelia Grain, Philadelphia 


SHOW PROPERTY FOR SALE—Noah’s Ark, built on Two Warons. steel ax'es, 5-in. tires, working firures on 
Ark, Alr Pump with motor and drum for wid, one 3-horse motor and one 5-horse motor to run Ark. All ready 
to set up and rum, Stored at Kansas City. Price, $4,000.00. Two sets Wagon Gears, wheels and steel axls, 5-in. 
tires. stored at Kansas City. Price, $175.00 for each set. Dramatic Outfit, ready to set up and run. 70-ft. round 
top, two 30-ft. middle pieces, one 40-ft. middle piece. Canvas im ood shape, except the 40-ft. middle piece, 
which is only in fair condition, 10-foot side wall, steel center poles, all ‘side and quarter poles, large stage. 
full set of scenery, electric cable and switchboard, foot and border lights, main guy lines, blocks amd falls, 
maskin, for reserved seats, 20x20 marqvee, red and khaki; 4 strings fine pennants and 4 large American 
flags, 350 folding steel chairs, with canvas seats and backs; 69 folding wooden benches, with canvas seats; 
8 lencths b'ue seats, nine-tier hivh; piano, light box full of globes, property boxes and props, and a world 


of other stuff that goes to make up an outfit of this kind. Complete list wil! be mailed to those inmteres.ed. 
Outfit stored im Afton, Okla. Price, $3.500.00. Universal Portable Light Plant, 4-k.w., mounted on truck. 
weighs 590 pounds. Used 10 weeks: new generator put on and used one week. Just like new. Stored at 


Afton, Okla, Price, $800.00. Address GEO. F. DORMAN, 2104 15th St.. ‘McAllen. Texas. 


MENTION US, PLEASE—THE BILLBOARD. 


No matinees, no Sunday shows and two bills 
a week. 


“THE HAPPY LAND GIRLS,” a newly or 


ganized musical comedy tabloid, gave their 
initial performance on Monday, February 27, 
at the Ideal Theater, Corsicana, Tex., their 


opening being the largest of any company play- 
ing there heretofore. The conpany js clean- 
cut and recommended by a ‘‘Corsicana Sun” 
critic as the classiest and most unique com- 
pany he has had the pleasure of witnessing. 
Everything seemed to blend to perfection, the 
dialog new and catchy, numbers exceptionally 
pretty, wardrobe and scenery all new and 
flashy. The company was organized in Dallas, 
Tex. The attraction concluded its engagement 
in Corsicana March 12 and proceeded to the 
Happy Land Theater, Dallas, for a permanent 
stock engagement. The roster of the com- 
pany includes: Simmons and Littlefield, owners: 
and managers; Frank Johnson, assistant man- 
ager; Jake Harmond, stage manager; Viola Hall, 
designer of wardrobe; Fernecé Winthrope, 
scenic artist; Arthur Jackson, producer; Happy 
Lawson and Billie Wilson, comedians; Billie 
Earle, juvenile; Leano Wahrman, prima donna; 
Erin White, ingenue; Babe Dumort, soubret; 
Midge Carro!l, gen. bus.; Clarence Brown, mu- 
sical director; Rose Stephen, Ruby Hackett, 
June Ca-Vette, Dorothy Sharp, Lois La Ferne, 
Dorothy Gibson, Dolly Ferguson and Charlotte 
Baker, chorus. The above reader has been en- 
dorsed by Manager W. Z. Herman of the 
Ideal Theater, Corsicana. 


WHY BE BALD 


When Plastic Can Give Both Ladies 
and Gentlemen a Natural Lux- 
uriant Head of Hair? 


A totally new imvention has brought untold 
hope and comfort to those who are wholly or 
partially BALD. PLASTIC is not a wig. Far 
fromit. A WI!IGisa JOKE. It never deceives any- 
lody. PLASTIC is a lifelike composition of cells 
of the exact 
pink color off* 
the scalp itself yy 


D 

skilfully 
they annot be 
distinguish e d 
from the nat- 
ural hair—a 
method of im- 
itating nature so closely and perfectly that it is 
utterly impossible for anyone to detect the differ- 
ence between my product and natural hair—the 
gift of Nature herself. Let us PROVE this to you. 


Write for particulars. Write at once. 


RICHARD B. ERNEST, 


101 W. 42nd St, New York City 


eS . | 
= 

ER AT A LEI: 

| 

Jagr = Ree 
Y The Sta +> 3 | os 

STEINS MAKE-UP 

6 Booklet Upon Request : 
CEE — ee | 
ans ee $$ | | 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


REVUE -COMIC OPERA: SPECTACLE :PAGEANTRY 
Conducted by GORDON WHYTE. 


(COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR NEW YORK OFFICES) 


Dazzling Music Show 


Is “The Rose of Stanboul’’— 
. Apparently Warrants Big 
Money Put Into It 


eS 


“THE ROSE OF STAMBOUL’—An operetta 
in three acts, with book and lyrics adapted 


by Harold Atteridge; music by Leo Fall 
and Sigmund Romberg; staged by J. C. 
Huffman; numbers staged by Allan K,. 


Foster; orchestra directed by Albert Good- 
man; stage settings by Watson Barratt. 
Presented by Lee and J. J. Shubert under 
the personal direction of J. J. Shubert at 
the Century Theater, New York, March 
%, 1922 


THE CAST—Tessa Kosta, James Bartin and 


Marion Green, co-starred with Mabel Withee 
and Zita and Naro Lockford, featured, and 
Henry Warwick, Jack MeGowan, Elizabeth 
Reynolds, Lon Hascall, Rapley Holmes, Elmira 
Lane, Otiilia Barton, Sibylla Bowhan, Emma 
Wilcox Maude Satterfield, Belle Mazelle, Lil- 
lian Wagner, Marjorie Wayne, John V. Lowe, 
Mile. Desha, Felicia Sorel, Heien Nelidova and 
Jack Scott 


If J. J. Shubert ever goes in for films Cecil 


DeMilie will have to look to his laurels. That's 
one thoncht that comes to mind after having 
seen “The Rose of Stamboul.” For that 
member of the Shubert firm known as “J. 
J." has out-ceciled DeMille in the presenta- 
tion of femining drapings and hangings and 
settings and such to the extent that the 


Shubert press department will have to in- 
crease its already versatile vocabulary. 

Color, light, girls and more girls and ex- 
Pense are ficst-night impressions of this latest 
effort to force the popularity of the Century 
Theater. As a show “The Rose of Stamboul’’ 
is dazzling and worth an evening. As a fashion 
fair it is worth several evenings. As enter- 
tainment it is being presented at $2.50 top 
with three stars and is no worse than lots 
of others that cost more to see, and better 
than many other very similar musical comedy 
Stories. But it’s pleasing and must have 
cost a lot of moncy. 

The story doesn’t matter much. It’s about 
the love affair of Kondja Gul (Tessa Kosta), 
the daughter of Kemel Pasha (Henry War- 
wick), and is tearful enough and sweet enough 
to suit even Miss Kosta. Kondja’s father 
has arranged for her marriage to Achmed 
Bey (Marion Green), the son of the prime 
minister, who under a pen name is fight'ng 
for the rights of Turkish women and at the same 


time setting their hearts a-flutter with his 
books of verse. Reading one of his love 
songs, Kondja determines upon him as her 


ideal and they arrange a meeting (English for 
“make a date’’) at the harem of Kemel Pasha 
at Stamboul, Turkey, which is the scene of 
the firts act. In this gorgeous setting, done 
as Watson Barratt can with plenty of money 
to spend, Kondja sings the love song, “My 
Heart Is Calling,” with the ladies of the 
harem (synonym for ensemble) helping in 
Dienty of encores, 

Meantime the secondary love story of Midill 
(Mabel With: e—just out of Shubert vaudeville), 
tho is Kondja’s dearest friend, and Howard 
iney Smith (Jack McGowan), son of Rodney 
ith (Rapley Holmes), ammunition maker of 
riigeport, Conn., is under way. Howard 
and Bob (James Barton), his valet, have run 
away from America so that Howard won't have 
to marry the gir! of his father’s choice, and 
have landed in  Stamboul. Howard has 
fallen in love with Midili and in no time at 
all hammers this fact into the andience with 
“Lovey Dove,”’ a Sigmund Romberg number 


that looks ‘ike the only hit, if any, in the 
thow. ‘“‘Lovey Dove’’ sounds very much like 
the old German blackboard song, but that 


foesn’t matter at all, for Romberg has an ar- 
rangement that Mr. Goodman and his very good 
orchestra are pounding out for a likely hum- 
ming number. It’s considered good enough 
by the management to try again in the last act 
and, of course, it’s the exit piece. 

After the first encoring of “Lovey Dove” 
Jim Barton gets in some of his funny business 
and peps the show up from then on, Right 
here let it be said that Mr. Barton is the 


SHOW PRINTING 


New Price List just issued. Saves you money. 
CURTISS. - - —-— Continental, Ohie. 


real star of the piece. The audience let that 
be understood very plainly and Jim responded 
and responded unti] his feet must have ached 
from dancing and his heart must have ached for 
joy. He's a real comedian, this fellow, who 
“does his stuff’ and doesn’t want more than 
his share. Another player might have showed 
a selfish streak. James Barton doesn’t need 
to crowd any of his fellow entertainers. 

The third of the co-stars, Marion Green, 
up to the reputation he already 
imself. In charming voice he cou ted Kondja, 
“The Rose of Stamboul,’’ declining to let her 
know that the man she hates, because he is 
being ferced upon her jn marriage, is the 
man she loves. He wants to win her from 
his rival (himse!f) and starts in rich baritone. 
Why it’s necessary to sing his love song to 
the audience may be answered by the man 
responsible for the lack of acoustic aids in the 
Century Theater, but why he has to be backed 
up by eight Turkish bellhops, or whatever 
they are supposed to be, cannot be answered. 
Marion Green needs no chorus to help him 
sing a love song. 

Except for the startling close when Mr. Green 
and Miss Kosta have the stage alone in his 
jaace and he reveals suddenly to his bride 
her boudoir—fit for the highest-salaried movie 
queen in Hollywood—the second act belongs to 
the Lockfords and the costumers. This start- 
ling pair—sister and brother—discovered by 
Morris Gest in the Folies Bergere, Paris, and 
introduced to America thru Shubert vaudeville, 
gave James Barton a close race for first honors, 
if one may judge by applause. Their dancing 
has been described in The Billboard several 
times, so all that need be said here is that 
they have a setting they deserve and that 
they make the most of it in “The Rose of 
Stamboul.”” They also open the second act, 
programmed “On the Riviera,’ with more 
amazing dances. They are too good for words. 

“Lovey Dove’ and Barton build up this last 
act and, quite naturally, the hero gets the 
girl. 

Mabel Withee deserves praise as the ingenne, 
and in Jack McGowan she has a good partner. 
As for Rapley Holmes, this artist hasn't enough 
to do. He brings on a traveling bag and up- 
braids his son. Not much of a part for such 
an entertainer. 

Summed up the show offers color, light, girls, 
more girls, the co-stars, Mabel Withee and 
the Lockfords, legs and bare legs and expense. 
Too much expense, we would say, but maybe 
it will put the Century on the map, and 
that will be something.—JED FISKE. 


MABEL WITHEE TO STAR 


lived 
had made for 


New York, March 10.—Mabel Withee, who 
is playing in “The rose of Stamboul”’ at the 
Century Theater, signed a contract with the 
Shuberts yesterday which calls for her being 
starred in a musical show next season. Miss 
Withee was the last of many changes made in 
the cast of ‘‘The Rose of Stamboul”’ and is sa'd 
to have made a big hit at the opening of the 
show at Hartford. Before joining this piece 
Miss Withee p'ayed in ‘‘Sally, Irene and 
Mary”, a vaudeville act on the Shubert Time. 


SELLS “SWEETHEART SHOP” 


Chicago, March 9.—The sheriff of Cook 
County today sold the production of the defunct 
“Sweetheart Shop’, Inc., for $1,000, pursuant 
to a judgment rendered by Judge Hebel a few 
days ago. Frank Dare, Ch'cago representative 
of the Actors’ Equity Association, bid the 
property in at the above figure. The Equity 
held a judgment on the property for $7,068.86, 
representing salary claims of actors. 

The “Sweetheart Shop’ closed in the Olym- 
p'e Theater, June 21, 1921, when the Equity 
Association was unable to obtain the payment 
of salar‘es due its members who were per- 
formers in the company. There were a num- 
ber of bidders at theysale today, the second 
highest bid being $750. 


“PINS AND NEEDLES” CLOSING 


New York, March 10.—‘Pins and Needles,’ 
the English musical revue brought to this 
country by Albert de Courville, and which 
has been playing here at the Shubert Theater, 


will close tomorrow night. Tommy Mosto] lett 
the show some time ago, but the rest of 
the company, with the exception of Maisie 
Gay, will play the piece in an iiicaaiened 


version on the Shubert vaudeville circult. 


RADIN GETS GIFT BATON 


New York, March 10.—Oscar Radin, con- 
ductor of the orchestra for ‘Blossom Time,”’ 
was presented with a silver baton by members 
of the company on the occasion of his conduct- 
ing the 300th performance of that piece this 
week, Of the 300 performances, Radin has 
conducted 179 here and the remainder on the 
road before the piece was brought to this 
city. 


“FABLES” CLOSES 


New York, March 10.—‘‘Frank Fay's Fables” 
closed at the Park Theater here last Satur- 
day night. Business had been bad from the 
start and Broadway never figured the show 
bad much chance. Harry L. Cort, producer 
of the piece, left for Palm Beach to recover 
from an illness which ha contracted while 
rehearsing the show. 


ELSIE JANIS FOR “MUSIC BOX” 


New York, March 10.—It is said here that 
Sam H. Harris is negotiating with Elsie Janis 
to star in the next production to be made at 
“The Music Box’. Clark and McCullough have 
already been engaged for the show, which is not 
expected to open unti] next season on account 
of the popularity of the present ‘‘Musie Box 
Revue”’. The present attraction will probably 
take to the road intact next season. 


“LOLA” REHEARSING 


New York, March 10.—‘‘Lola,” a new play 
with music, formerly known as “Let *Er Go, 
Letty,” was scheduled to open at Rochester 
this week. In the cast are Helen Shipman, 
Clarence Derwent, Eddie Garvie, A. J. Herbert, 
Lenore Novassio and Eunice Burnham. 


Smashing Riots, with “Kneok-Out” Punch Lines on 
Home,” “All Ty Myse'f.”* 


the finish. You can stop a show with 


Any single or doub'e act can clean up with this. 
im your act, send $5 fer this NOW. You get 


HARRY C. 


1064 St. Nicholas Avenue, 


10 SURE-FIRE PARODIES, $5. 00 


15 *“Second-F > nd yo = A 

e of them. 

FREE—With each order for Parodies I mill send a Sensational Comic Medley on late song hits. 
greater 


it by snectal delivery. 


New York City, 


“Ten Baby _Fincers, 2 “"Nobody’ Baby,” Tack 
Every one NEW, with a side-splitting “Kick a 


If you want REAL material to put 


PYLE, Jr., 


Near Audubon Theater 


WANTED AT ONCE FoR Musical stock 


Singing and Dancing Soubrette that can act. 


Wire or write lowest salary. Give full description of 


eye ter » Somteien. 


MOROSCO PROPERTIES MERGED 


New York, March 10.—The ‘recently an- 
nounced merger of practically all of Oliver 
Morosco’s theatrical interests into what is known 
as the Morosco Holding Co., Inc., has now been 
completed with the taking over of the produc. 
tion of ‘‘Letty Pepper’’, in wh'‘ch Miss Char- 
lotte Greenwood is starring. The holding 
company is capitalized for $1,500,000, and takes 
in charge the theaters in New York and Los 
Angeles previously controlled by Mr. Morosco 
personally; the Oliver Morosco Productions, 
Inc., which is the motion picture production 
unit of his organization, with its two first 
picture productions, ‘‘The MHalfbreed” and 
“Slippy McGee’, now about to be released; 
Miss Greenwood, in ‘‘Letty Pepper’; Leo Car- 
rillo in a new pay by the Hattons, and severa) 
other new plays and pictures now in prepara- 
tion on the Pacific Coast. 


“MECCA” AND “CHU” CLOSING 


New York, March 10.—Comstock & Gest will 
close ‘‘Mecca"’ and *“‘Chu Chin Chow’ shortly. 
The first named will close at Allentown, Pa., 
March 18, and ‘“‘Chu’’ will close in Ohio around 
the first of April. These are the only two 
shows which Comstock & Gest have left on the 
road this season. 


“SUNKIST” CLOSES 


New York, March 10.—*‘Sunkist,"’ the Fan- 
chon & Marco revue, will close at Loutvsille, 
Ky., tomorrow n ght. This show originated on 
the Coast and, altogether, has played 90 weeks 
on the road. 


INA CLAIRE FOR M. CG. 


New York, March 11.—Ina Claire will return 
to the musical comedy field next season under 
the Dillingham banner. She is to be starred in 
“The Binch and Judy"’, the new musical show 
written by Anne Caldwell] and Jerome Hern. 


TEAM LEAVES “SCANDALS” 


New York, March 10.—Clayton and Lennie, 
well-known vaudevile team, left “George 
White's Scandals’’ after playing one week 
on the road with that show. Clark and Verdi 
have taken their place. 


CANTOR SHOW FOR NEW YORK 


New York, March 12.—The new Eddie Can- 
tor show, ‘‘Make It Snappy’’, is slated to come 
into the 44th Street Theater on March 20. 
“Up in the Clouds,” at present playing that 
house, is due to leave March 18. 


MUSICAL COMEDY NOTES 


“The Music Box Revue” has passed the 200th 
performance mark. 

“Get Together,” at the Hippodrome, bas 
Played its 325th performance. 

Georgia Empey, sister of the Cleo Mayfield, 
is now a member of “The Blushing Bride. 

Mile, Marguerite and Frank Gill have intro 
duced a new dance in ‘“*The Music Box Revue”. 

June Korle has been engaged by The. Bo- 
hem'‘ans, Inc., for a new musical production. 

Marion Green, one of the stars in “The 
Rose of Stamboul’’, will give a song recital et 
the Century Theater, New York, April 23. 

Zoe Barnett has returned to the cast of ‘‘Blos- 
som Time’’. During her absence, on account of 
sickness, her part was played by Miss Dorothy 
Newell. 

Grace La Rue is with “The Blue Kitten. No, 
not THE Grace La Rue, but a chorus girl 
of the same name. 

Marjorie Sipp has joined “Shuffle Along.” 
Irving Jones will also join the same show this 
week. 

Katherine Annis, one of the sixteen dancing 
girls in “The Perfect Fool’’, is out of the 
show on account of sickness. 

Ceci] Lean has sold the Engl'sh singing rights 
to Charles B. Cochran of “Different Days’’, one 
of the song hits of “The Blushing Bride’. 


Five-Year Guarantee. 


1B. B. & B. Trunk Co. 


PITTSBURG, PA. 
3 Stores and Factory. 
Send for Folder. 
emma 


Must sing and dance for second comedy, 


L. Griffith producing here and wants to hear = Deorle that have worked for him. “Bill” Cushman, 


Mrs. Bert Johnson and Fem Ashwell, write or wire, 


ORPHEUM MUSICAL REVUE, Harvey Arlington, Mor., 


Orpheum Theatre, Grand Rapids, Mich, 


WANTED SIX CHORUS GIRLS 


Must be capable, young and good looking. Three Roger Sisters, Pudgie Orlien, 


ris, wire. This is $2.00 top attraction 
stands. Show runs all summer. 
young singing Ingenue. youne, tall Juvenile Man with 
son, March 15; Cnoe an 
Hinton, 


W, Va., 21. Bany “unde wire, 


playing Klaw & Erlanger Time, ane, sd 
Musical Comedy a ws e all 


Brownie Mayet, Dolly Har- 
three-nicght and week 
ANT 


ging company. WA 
ood volce. ASTOR PRODUCING COMPANY, Wil- 


lines write. Enla 


Goldsporo, 17; Raleigh, 18; all North Carolina, Cnarlottesville, Va., 20; 


W.H.De St. Cyr, 0.6.0.0. 


HAIR, SCALP SPECIALIST 
COSMETICIAN 


Scientific Treatment for the Hair. 
Face, Packs, Bleaches, etc. 
Room 1403, Mallers Building, 
5 So. Wabash ‘Ave., Cor, Madison St. 
Phone Central 7020. 
20% off to the Profession. 


v 
c 
b 
= 


, ° _ — ! 
pa 
a LLL LLL SS % % 
LLL LTE EE LT ETO ETE LE LLL ELLA LLL LEELA LEED LED LEE LL LEE 
gu 7 ee ” 
, | ’ YY Y Y, YW ly Yy YY Yy YY / Yi ' G »Y , 4 | 
J VAL AVA O77) 4 UAW D9: Y) Y = im )Y tw 
i Yy Ug YY Yy yy y Vy Yy Y Y d YYyy y the 
| Yyy Yj UH ff Y  Yu;jw|qj@]qMhVew@qqwqn4q\“V’,_ wWJ_ jjfyyyyyyyy) YY - sta 
; . IIB © Sal 
4e ——— Th 
iH Ke 
5 ‘ ip! 
01 
] 
| 4 eC Hs 
¥ we 
ee * 
ik pa 
: ‘ the 
j ser 
ai a Ge 
the Ge 
‘ha rs 
i let 
mF — Al 
a ni 
| ; th 
+ ; | a 
ee ee 
fa coment’ ar 
he SS c 
4 ; w 
ie 
it a 
aL a 
4) i a 
i eC - 
| ontetetien r 
a 
ey pi 
4 b 
; | w 
Ahh T 
i es ‘ 
ee ny t 
a ee _ 
a ; ae 
Be ee 
ee 
‘ ee 
: | 
’ ee 
| 
——— 
a 
ih Be — e 
mi? Ye, ——". 5 — — | 
| i | a Zink Trunks 
7 
| f= 2} $50.00 
/ 
| SSS es | | 
’ Eee iF 5 * . 
RE ES SR LD LATS 
i ‘ 
| PB 
| a 
| 
| 
i 
La . 
| 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboara 


51 


= 
———— 


THE OLD LA SALLE STOCK 
DEVELOPED FAMOUS PEOPLE 


—_——= 


Chicago, March 10.—Two press agents and 
two booking agents, all statisticians, and a 
manager, tried te figure out today some of 


the now famous players who got either their 


start or an early boost here in the old La 


Salle stock. A Billboard reporter listened. 
Yhe arrival in town of Frances Kennedy, big 
Keith headliner, Who loomed early and re- 
plendently in the La Salle stock, started the 
sonversat.on 

It was back in the mellow days when Mort, 
Harry and Will Singer, youthful producers, 
were hold.ng down the job of making stars 
and beading off a steady stream of perfect'y 


that the La Saile stock was an 
institution. Among the novit-:ates and those 
past the beginnet’s stage who rose high in 
Peggy O'Neill, later to enter 
serious drama; Frances Kennedy, Cecil Lean, 
Fred Mace, now dead; Florence Holbrook, 
Georgia Drew Mendum, Dave Lewis, Alexander 
Carr, Al Shean, Junie McCree, Guy Voyer, Al- 
len Brooks, James C. Marlowe, Arthur Deagon, 
Al Leach and Bil'y Robinson, who was a 
member of the stock for eight years. of 
coure, there were many others. 

After the Singews moved the stock over to 
their then new Princess Theater Jack Barry- 
more and Sallie Fisher tarried for some time 
with the company in “A Stubborn Cinderella.” 

Will Hough and George Adams, librettists, 
and Joseyh ©. Toward, wrter of tunes, also 
got a big start toward success in a long tenure 
with this company. 


SPCAKING OF TWINS— 


Chicago, March 19.—The Fairbanks Twins, 
who star in “Two Litt'e Girls in Blue," now 
running here at the Colonial, with the Town- 
son Brothers, also twns, as their dancing 
partners, wilk have their portraits painted and 
be done in clay by Ivan and Marvin Albright, 
well-known twin artists of this city. Rollo 
Timponi, manager of the Colonial, who like- 
wise is one of twins, was the means of in- 
troduction between the Fairbanks and the 
Albright twins, 


“RED PEPPER” TO CHICAGO 


Chicago, March 11.—‘‘Rea vepper,”’ with the 
veterans, McIntyre and Heath, comes to Chi- 
cago April 16. One of the Shubert houses will 
be used. 


good money 


their work was: 


— 
~- 


SUT 


JACK MILLS, Inc. 
MUSIC PUBLISHERS ~ 

152 West 45th Street 

NEW YORK CITY 


TTT 


SUGGESTS _ 
+6 


“DEAR uD. 
AN 


for Vaudeville and Concert 
Singers, Quartets, Chautau- 
qua Artists, Orchestras, Etc. 


POGUOOSUEOEDDODEEOUOEDORGUEROEOORODEODDORDOCODDOUUEDEDOCUCCRED ROD EEOME 


ANY MATERIAL 

YOU MAY DESIRE 
FOR THIS PURPOSE 
~ WILL BE SENT 
ON REQUEST. 


oy, 


oe ae 


CUCU 


Saaeee 


Stn 


i 


THPPUPEOUUEOROCUOGEDODERROUEOOUEODE 


JUILLET 


ad 


“LISTEN TO ME” REPORTS 
’ BIG SOUTHERN BUSINESS 


Chicago, March 7.—Harry Allen, agent for 
LeComt & Flesher’s ‘‘Listen To Me,’ writes 
The «Billboard office here from Charleston, 8S. 
C., that business with the show is good. 
Harry says: 

“Our returns in the South have been phe- 
nomenal despite the general depression that 
seemed prevalent th’s season. We succeeded 
in getting turnaway crowds in Jacksonville, 
Orlando, Tampa, St. Augustine and Miami, re- 
paying us for the long jumps into the country 
where real ‘oprys’ are few and far between.” 

Mr. Allen informs that bathing and sunshine 
in the balmy resorts were much appreciated 
by company members. Walter M. Roles, one 
of the most skilled contractors in the country 


and who has for years been ahead of the Le- 
Comt & Flesher show, is an aeroplane enthusi- 
ast and made a number of ascensions while in 
Frank Flesher nearly had heart failure 
at this procedure and implored his contractor 
to wait until the season was over before taking 


Miami. 


such chances. 
“Listen To Me’’ will close about May 30. 


The Jacksonville Times-Union paid high com- 


pliment on the performance in that city, and 
made special note of the work of Billy Moore, 
Ross Robertson, Maude Baxter, Billy Murphy, 
Barbara’ Bronell, 
Delmore. 


“DANCING BLUES” TO SHOW 


New York, March 11.—The ‘‘Dancing Blues,” 
a@ new musical comedy produced by Jack Blue, 


Leslie Jones and Bessie 


well-known dancing instzuctor, has been put 
into rehearsal here and will open Easter Week 
at the Blue Theater, Long Branch, N, J. The 
cast is made up of talented children and pro- 
fessional dancers-to-be, al] of whom are study- 
ing under Blue. The piece will go on tour, 
playing Atlantie City for a week, then in 
towns in and around New Jersey. 


DON BERLIN JOINS McDANIEL 


Chicago, March 10.—Jimmie Hudson, generay 
manager of the Joseph B. McDaniel Company, 
music pubtishers of New York, writes The Bill- 
board office here from South Bend, Ind., saying 
Don Berlin has been added to the McDaniel staff. 
Mr. Hudson adds that Mr. 


vandeville. 


Berlin is a new 
song writer of promise who is well known in 


He was a Musical Athlete! 


He sang in the marvelous way that he did because of 
the superb development of his Hyo-Glossus Muscle—the 
muscle that determines the singing quality of every voice. 

Develop your Hyo-Glossus Muscle! A good voice will 
be made better, a lost voice restored, stammering or stutter- 


ing cured. 


The Complete 
Vocal Mechanism 


Your Voice Can Be Improved 100% 


, pe have a Hyo-Glossus Muscle in 
your throat. If it is large and vigor- 
ous, you have a beautiful voice, you are a 
“born” singer. If it is small, undeveloped, 
your voice is apt to be weak, or harsh, or 
shrill; maybe you stammer or stutter. 
Weaken and abuse this muscle by im- 
proper use and you lose what singing voice 
you have. 


Good Voices Made Better 
Lost Voices Restored 


Thru Professor Feuchtinger’s methods 
you can develop your Hyo-Glossus Muscle 
by simple, silent muscular exercises, right 
in your own home, in the privacy of your 
own room. 

Strengthen this muscle and your voice 
becomes full, resonant and rich. Your 
tones will have a color and purity surpass- 
ing your dreams. If you speak in public 
your voice will have vigor, expression, car- 


rying power and endurance. All defects of 
speech will be remedied. 
A Real Money Back Guarantee 


The Perfect Voice Institute does not 
ask you to take a chance. We absolutely 
guarantee that Professor Feuchtinger’s 
methods will improve your voice 100% in 
your opinion—or refund your money. 


PERFECT VOICE INSTITUTE 


Studio 1993 


1922 Sunnyside Avenue, 


You are to be the sole judge; on your 
decision depends whether or not we keep 
your money. 

You take no risk. We take no risk. 
Over 10,000 pupils have received the 
happy benefits of Professor Feuchtinger’s 
methods. They always make good. 


Who Professor Feuchtinger Is 

Abroad, the name of Feuchtinger is one 
to conjure with. The grandfather of the 
professor was Court Director for the Duke 
of Waldeck; his father was a great musical 
leader during the reign of Charles, King of 
Wurtemberg. Professor Feuchtinger, A. M., 
is well known in the musical world for the 
work he has done in discovering and per- 
fecting a series of exercises that will 
develop the Hyo-Glossus Muscle in any 
throat—the same training that is being 
offered you thru the Perfect Voice Insti- 
tute. He has lectured before many uni- 
versities and colleges here and abroad. 
His personal pupils run into the hundreds. 


Great Opera Stars Among His 
Students 
Mdme. Puritz-Schuman, Sofie Wiesner, 
Metropolitan Opera; Villy Zuern, Paul Hoc- 
heim, Julius Brischke, Mdme. Marg. Krabb, 
Paul Bauer, Magda Lumnitzer, Adolph Kopp, 
Yiva Hellberg, Anton Hummelstein—these 


Chicago | 
_ | 


are only a few of the operatic song birds who 
have studied under Professor Feuchtinger 
during his years as a maestro in Berlin, 


Practice In Your Home 


There is nothing hard or complicated about 
the professor's methods. They are ideally 
adapted for correspondence instruction. Give 
him a few minutes a day—that’'s all. The 
exercises are silent. The results are sure. 

If ambitious to improve or restore your voice, 
you owe it to yourself to learn more about the 
function and the importance of the singing 
muscle—the Hyo-Glossus. Inform yourself 
about this new and scientific method of voice 
culture. The literature we send will be a 
revelation and an education. 


Send For FREE Illustrated Booklet 
Today 

Every reader of Puystcat Curture is 
cordially invited to send for Professor Feuch- 
tinger’s great book on this subject. It’s free 
if you fill out the coupon below. The number 
of these books is limited. Don’t delay! Don't 
wait! Act today! Filling out the coupon below 
may be the turning point in your life. Send 
it right away. 


PERFECT VOICE INSTITUTE 
Studio 1993, 1922 Sunnyside Ave., 
Chicago, Ill. 


Send me the illustrated, FREE book and facts 


about the Feuchtinger Method. I have put 
X opposite subject that interests me most. I 
assume no vbligations whatever. 


Sing*ng Speaking Stammering Weak 
WHat cccccccccccecoeseesesecccsecesvcocsces 


Address . cc cccccccccccccccccccccccscescsses 


Be ee HH HEHEHE HEHEHE EH HEED 


-— ag SORES “ 


7} = : a 
a ee - , 
SS = 7 
LLL ee 
Po ee 
os 
ee : 
ee Eo ———_ : 
ss 
el So / hi 
NN ee SRS f i ‘ 
_ Greatnes Ss aoe | 
: z 
eC . , , eg ' 
‘ rs . on - % Pe y 8 2d . a> . i ‘ 
P we, = in Be » 8 See ee a 
‘ Pi Pe ge eas ae RE ga SS SE oc aes . 
ae ik ee i a Nhe Bo | Be % | 
BSS “ ee oom a ee oi Se cnet thes 2 3 Sitti See eres cee es oe - =a gaa GLY ZA i 
a ; s soe a ES ae SRI PRR | Sea eee a ie” td pomeary CZ =f 
i a Bex be BY : oe Wines 5S pee oe Pe | s S Kf ; 
ie 4 x es es ae Be gees ; ee Bi Ess Re eee Bs Be 3 ai t \ \' f ¥ : 
Bo ay aes a eh we: bs Be re oe Pe ] - SY if <= 
ae ape tee ee ae Pees é : SED ns MER OR & Soe VES ee | = oe a EAS: hy Ba | = ake 
aaa — a ee eee i VAS Weak te Ee Sy Beet: WY. ie Tine, 
vas aoe Se : ete a ares, bg ak Bg ce et oe ro es Zz th A | % Z 
a ae ss ‘ I P 5 ia sts, eo. Ses ae ae Se eee | j SS Pe me ME Be: F 
— ey: ee 3 ae» eee % sons J Bet. A ee Ser 4 vu ih yp: —" fas) f , St a ae, 
Sie Ei 3 ~ i Yi See aaa 4 ee e NE ED es ca hoe ef hi UP at Ve == if i oA ~ 3 i 
RI WE we «= Re Vas EN ye RA ef 17 I 
z 2. eS eae Oe ee. . Bs. RES. ee ee Sa Pe ool Ge = th | ° , ee: 
a } of; — a fC ee” ee a i<' < Tea | te 
—— aw we FF nde ™, eee 8 Oe AL, ‘Vy \ ve ie aN | ae gir 
: ee OF ee RMN gy ee, ite Be ae 
se ae SS * s- : ; " “3 ees ere pees: \y AR 1 } i“ iis ' en 
+ ee RS oat it P§ x Fete Sees Se er eee | ny ANS } 1 : 
ge on | , oe At ‘ Ra Pie ee Re aT The Hyo-Gl P A | 
° etn, : Ss a ee Pare + Cb Re aa SEPT meee { ossus ok ) . 
waits he ee oe : ROGUES... ae PSE | a) . RL ET ee 
— Anan: is Sip 24 Ey ; RZ ’ : ll eat gts \e--4 ho a ] 
SSS a ILL ‘ ‘ as es 5 sinew ua ~"* J 
<s er eee «( SA Sa 
Pk ar - \ % 4 Ue t A 
- a Do. | . 
= nae MGS =f 
: = i 2 oy te i 
Po | 
’ 
/ ; es 
[ 
\ | | : 
a | 
[ — 
= ne 
Lancs 
Dts | 
a ae ;° 
a. ; 
7 Pe = ; 
ee a 
; : La CN ' ; 


nae pace 4 PR RY a LT 


~ - 


- 


une" M_ 


ee 
5 OF ie 


a ae 


ep ms Fy TAvReLb oe. bie 


ae 
44 


32 


The Billboard 


&:@ 


MARCH 18, 1920 


BRASS TACKS 
By VAUD E. VILLE 


I see where a paper tipped off the salaries of 
some of the booking agents. 

Trying to make some of the actors sore—who 
have paid commissions toward the big wages. 


Shubert says they will not sell out their 
vaudeville circuit, but will have thirty-five 
weeks next season. Good, we hope they will 
play vaudeville acts first, and, in case they have 
to fill in will sec..yg some more vaudeville acts, 


Whet are the heads of vaudeville doing ta 
secure a reduction in passenger rates? 

We mean E. F, Albee, J. J. Murdock, J. and 
L. Shubert, Marcus Loew, Alexander Pantages, 
Mr. Miles, Martin Beck, Mort Singer and their 
advisers. 

Also the V. M. P. A., the N. V. A., the 
Equity, the A. A. F., the I, A. T. S. E., the 
Musicians; in fact, EVERYBODY in VAUDE- 
VILLE. 


If artists have some good publicity stunt that 
can be utilized by the ‘‘house’’ manager, get 
after him to put it across during your appear- 
ance at his house, Get your name known in 
each city you play. Get a following among the 
vaudeville patrons. That’s what makes you 
valuable and increases your salary, 


All the old “‘hits’? from medicine shows have 
been introduced in vaudeville. Next thing you 
know some one will be pulling a complete 
“medicine”? act—as a new act. 

At that many a saccessful vaudeville artist 
today collected a good bit of his showmanship 
around a ‘‘medicine’’ or ‘‘tank’’ troupe, 

Some more vaudeville succes-es are: Carl Ran- 
dall, Rome and Gaut, Wm. Seabury, Pinto and 
Boyle, Joe Towle, Jack Trainor, Leo Zarrell, 
Ruby Norton, Lohse and Sterling, Claudius and 
Scarlet. : 

In regular vaudeville houses they pay the acts 
off after the last matinee so that the artist can 
attend to the paymen/ of his bills without wait- 
ing until ready to step on the train. 

It is the essence of “‘small time’? where you 
have to go out to the “front” and collect after 
you have finished the engagement. 


Why will some orchestras insist upon marking 
their own private cues on an artist’s music— 
when the cues are plainly marked? 


“‘Temperamental” artists are now more notice- 
able among the ‘‘smal!-timers’’ than among the 
big ones. 

The big “temperamental”? stars were made to 
“eut it out,” altho a few of them pull it now 
and then. 

“Temperament” is natural with some and ac- 
quired by many. 

Remember these signs seen sometimes “‘back 
6tage’’?: 

“Do your full act here.’’ 

“We pay after the last show. Don’t cheat 
if you expect to draw full salary.” 

“If you’ve got the act, the audience will get 
you,” 

“The stage manager wili tell you where to 
eat.”” 

“We have played *em all here.” 

*“‘Don’t knock the orchestra; the leader is a 
music teacher with a big trade.”’ 


Harvey Watkins is an oldtime outdoor show- 
man, 

So is Manager Eggleston, of Keith’s, Indian- 
apolis. 


The Keith Circuit among other things needs a 
new theater in Toledo. 

Understand that Shuberts have given up the 
idea of a “small-time”? department in conjunc- 


A) PLAYS 


Large list of new and 

standard plays, royalty 

and non-royalty; com- 

edies, farces, dramas; 
vaudeville acts, stage monologues, 
specialties, minstrel first-parts, skits 
and afterpieces, musical comedies 
and revues, novelty entertainment 
books, short cast bills, new and old, 
for stock and repertoire; Boy Scout, 
Camp Fire Girl and other juvenile 
plays. Complete line of entertain- 
ment books for all occasions. 


T. S. DENISON & COMPANY, 
623 SO. WABASH, Dept. 16, CHICAGO. 


TIGHTS 


AND ALL C1 EER SUPPLIES. 
@end for Free lilustrated Catalogue. 


WAAS & GON, 225 N. Sth St, Philadelphia, Pa, 


STAGE 
DANCIN 


Taught by 


New York’s 
Leading Dancing Master 


Formerly Dancing Master for 
FLO ZIEGFELD, JR. 
NED WAYBURN 
JOHN CORT 
CHAS. DILLINGHAM 
LEE and J. J. SHUBERT 
and the CAPITOL THEATRE 


LARGEST THEATRE IN THE WORLD 

Mr. Baker’s vast knowledge of stage dancing, which he has ae- 
quired by his many years as an artist and producer on the profes- 
sional stage, makes his ability as a creator of new dances unlimited. 

Go to any vaudeville show or Broadway production and you will 
see several acts on the bill doing dances arranged by Walter Baker. 

Mr. Baker’s system is so simple that it enables you to give an 
exhibition after you have taken a few lessons, without previous ex- 
perience. 

It’s the life and snap that Mr. Baker puts into the dancing he 


teaches that has made him so successful, and today holds the title 
of New York’s leading dancing master. 


A few celebrities who have studied under Mr. Baker: 


MARILYNN MILLER FLORENCE WALTON 
FAIRBANKS TWINS ETTA PILLARD 
HYSON & DICKSON PEARL REGAY 
TRADO TWINS MURIEL STRYKER 
GRACE MOORE DONALD KERR 

THE MEYAKOS RITA OWIN 

MAST KIDDIES GUS SHY 


‘ AND OTHERS 
The high rating of the above celebrities is enough to convince 


any one as to Mr. Baker’s ability, and the satisfaction of his 
graduates is the secret of his success. 


Those desiring a good, reliable, legitimate school call, phone or write 


WALTER BAKER 
Dept. B, - - 939 Eighth Ave. 


Near 55th St., Short Block West of Broadway 
Phones, Circle 8290-6130 N. Y. City 


a 
——. 


tion with their bookings. Good. There are too 
many small-time dates now, 


— 
Robert Emmett: Replying to yonr query, 
“Does Vaud. BE, Ville believe in actors’: 
Before anwsering you will have to define for 
me the meaning of “‘actors,”” with the meaning 
as applied to vaudeville—by you, 
Ever hear of an author looking for 
to play the characters in his play? 
Ever hear of an actor looking for an autho 
to write material to suit his “‘type’’y 
Which are the most successful—in vaudeville: 
The actor and author who do this, op the 
author who writes ‘‘material by the foot” and 
“charges by the inch,”’ and the actor who 
“buys” material by mail, over the phone, by 
auto suggestion, guesswork, imagination, ete. 
pay for it, are continually changing the ma 
terial, showing and breaking it in, 


“types” 


Acts that feature “wardrobe” should take 
Pains to keep it CLEAN. 


It would be much better if ‘hookers’ of the 
different vandaville circuits were to take a trip 
over their own circuits and get an idea as to 
what appeals to their own andiences instead— 

Of taking a trip to Europe to see what ap- 
peals to audiences over there. 

They might take a look at some of the acts 
in this country that never get a chance here, and 
who have to go to Europe to get good enough 
to be booked in this country. 

NOW is a good time for those who have charge 
of those things to begin gathering up some regu: 
lar acts to play in all of those beautiful new 
theaters that have been built in which vande 
ville is to be shown in 1922-'23, ° 

The audiences will be tired of looking at the 
costly furnishings by the time the next vande- 
ville season opens. 


McNALLY’S WO) 
BULLETIN 


PRICE, ONE DOLLAR PER COPY 


Gigantic collection of 140 pages of new, bright 
and al Comedy Material for vaudeville 
stage use, embracing everything that can be 
of use to the performer, no matter what sort 
of an act, monologue, parody or fill-in bits he 
may require, Notwithstanding that MoNally's 
Bulletin No. 7 is bigger in quantity and bet- 
ter in quality than ever before th 
mains as always, $1.00 per copy. 
the following gilt-edge, up-to-date Comedy 
Material: 


20 SCREAMING MONOLOGUES 


Each one a tive hit. All kinds, including 
Hebrew, Irish, Nut, Wop, Kid, Temperance, 
a and Whiteface, Female. Tramp end 


12 ROARING ACTS FOR TWO MALES 
Each act an applause winner. 
11 Original Acts for Male and Female 
They"ll make good on any Dill. 
57 SURE-FIRE PARODIES 


on all of Broadway's latest eong hits. Each 
one is full of pep. 


GREAT VENTRILOQUIST ACT 
entitled “A Chip of Wit.” It's @ riot. 
ROOF-LIFTING ACT FOR TWO FEMALES 
This act is a 24-karat eure-fire hit. 

A RATTLING QUARTETTE ACT 


for two males and two females. This act is 
alive with humor of the rib-ticklirg kind. 


4 CHARACTER COMEDY SKETCH 


entitled “Maggie O'Malley.” It's a eceam 
from start to finish. 


9 CHARACTER TABLOID COMEDY 
It’s bright, breezy and bubbles over with wit. 
12 MINSTREL FIRST-PARTS 
with aide-splitting jokes and hot-shot cross 

fire gags. 


GRAND MINSTREL FINALE 


entitled “The Art of Fabrication.” 
keep the audience yelling. 


of cracker-jack Crose-Fire Jokes and Gass. 
which can be used for sidewalk conversation 
for two males and male and female. 


BESIDES 
material which ts useful to the 


It will 


per ; 
or will send you Bulletins Nos. 6 and 7 for 
$1.50, with money back guarantee. 


WM. McNALLY 
81 East 125th Street, New York 


WIG 


MAKE- 
UP 


THE KETTLER 
& W. Washington St, 


y > 
j = ee 1 
i Pa MMM. RR SEE 7 Syl 
ee . ——— ne ne RR Sn nN one nn tem 
1 . So % 
Sa of = “Ss 
<< . 
mei > SSRs: 
jf 
4 : 
i] 
F a = 
t 
HS 
H fe 
yy | ed 
Thee 
|" 
: is | 
| a 
a Sc | 
: = a | 
| 
a | 
i _ es 
| , HUNDREDS 
| 
| a 
‘ 
| ee a 
| vaudeville performer ’% BUL- 
| Po 
| a ee aS 
| $< co. 
ee — can 
i 
I 
‘ a ¥ 


_MAROH 1 WB The ae 33 


Theatre Ones of cia! | } 


=—and Carnival Shows 


ADVERTISE YOUR ATTRACTIONS 


AADIOTELEPHON) 


The Marvel of the Universe 


WIRE OR WRITE US 


For Full information 


Lae 


National Radio Institute 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 


; eos 
ie | 
ESTABLISHED o081 bi | 
A ik 


Hele 
Be Hy 
hy 
iy | 
ni 
Te 
' 
oe BY wee ie 
' : 
Pod 
| 4 
| 
. 
f 
it 
I tS : 
\ 
| | ul iy 
) 
Oe 


rel te am 


* 


= = - mone le 


ae eg 


‘ies 


= 


* 


« 
ral 
% 
‘f 
% 


a 


The Billboard 


THE PO 


Yo 


aed 


4 
$ 
4 
; 
7 
ij 
ved 


PULAR, SONG BOURSE 


"Conducted by E.M. WICKES 


OUTDOOR MUSIC 


The outdoor season is about to make ite 
e@nnual appearance. How does it look to you? 
Maybe you lost money last year and figure that 
the coming season will not treat you any bet- 
ter. Perhaps, owing to the pessimism running 
loose, you are undecided about trying your 


luck again. . 
Forget about what occurred last year, That’s 


Gead and gone. It's true people did not epend 
as in former years, but that was because ccn- 
@itions were too uncertain. They ached to 
fly to outdoor shows, spend their money and 
enjoy themselves, but they feared to let go 
any of the money they had, not knowing when 
they would be able to get more, or just when 
they would find themselves out of employment. 
As a result they suffered from the lack of men- 
tal relaxation, And because people did not 
spend with a free hand, outdoor skowmen got 
the idea that they did not have any money 
or there wasn’t much money in this country. 

There is plenty of money in this country, 
and if you offer the right kind of a show you'll 
get your share—and part of the other fellow’s 
who is trying to get by with bunk. The ma- 
jority of people have money to spend for what 
they want, but at present they are not throw- 
ing it away. A teller in one of the best known 
eavings banks recently said that his institution 
was taking in more money than at any other 
time in its history. As another proof that peo- 
ple will spend if you happen to have what 
they want, take the case of “Shuffle Along.”’ 
Here is a show that is practically buried in 
the woods, so far as the theatrical district of 
New York is concerned. It is playing in an 
out-of-the-way street, almost a mile from the 
heart of the theatrical center, and has been 
running since last May, while other shows head- 
ed by stars and backed by fortunes, can’t get 
by, even tho they have the choice of show 
houses. 

If you think people have no money, or that 
they are unwilling to loosen up, just get in 
touch with some one connected with the manu- 
facture of radio outfits. One company, re 
ported to be in bad shape six months ago 
owing to poor business, is now three years bee 
hind with its orders. Manufacturers of radio 
outfits are swamped with orders. They do 
not have to solicit business either. Dealers 
come to their offices with cash and beg for 
goods. 

And you as an outdoor showmcn can get your 
share of money this season if -ou hustle and 
offer the right kind of attractions. When put- 
ting your show together don’t overlook music. 
The richt kind of music will kelp your show 
and the wrong kind will hurt it. One of the 
Teasons people patronize outdoor shows is to 
hear music. They look forward to hearing a 
certain amount of new music, and they are 
keen to hear some of the stuff that is just be- 
ginning to catch on, 

People get tired of any one thing if fed too 
much of it. Right now the public is tiring of 
a stealy diet of jazz. A slow reaction against 
jazz has set in, and if you permit your musi- 
cians io grind out jazz by the hour you won't 
hold a crowd very long. Jazz moves the feet, 
but not the hearts. To make any real appeal, 
jazz has to be rendered by experts, and eves 
then it does not begin to compare with sweet, 
simple melodies. John McCormack, who never 
indulges in jazz music, can draw a hundred 
Persons to hear him to every one the country’s 
Sreatest jazz expert could attract. Sousa never 
Wrote jazz and plays very little of it, but he 
has been accorded an international recogni- 
tion that jazz will never win for any one of 
its exponents, 

Jazz has its place and you'll do a wise thing 
to use some of it during the coming eeason. 
But regardless of what you use be sure to get 
musicians who know how to play. A good 
melody well played will draw and hold a crowd 
and day. One of the drawbacks of the popular 
music business is the average pianist in the 
department stores. To say the least they are 
atrocious. In fact, they don’t know bow to 
play. Everything they grind out sounds alike. 
Instead of creating sales they actually drive 
business away. You would think that store 
Managers would realize how detrimental these 
music butchers are and fire them. Most man- 


agers, rather than pay a few more dollars 
weekly for a good player, let the businese 
suffer. 

Mr. Showman, yon will fall into the same 
rut and fail to make money, or less money 
than you should, if you don’t pay attention to 
the kind of music you offer your audience, 
The music is an impor:ant part of your show; 
not infrequently it is the salesman who eelis 
the show, especially when the concert is given 
gratis. When people come within sight of 
your show they do so because they are out for 
pleasure and relaxation, and in a mood 
to be entertained, and if they are not stupid 
they know that they have to pay for good en- 
tertainment. Very often ‘they judge what you 
have inside by what you show outside. So it 
is up to you to give them cheerful music, the 
kind they know and understand, or what they 
know partly. Give them some of the semi-old 
with the new. Don't feed them all old jazz 
stuff, or all new stuff they never heard. Mix 
their musical diet. At present all the big pub- 
lishers, as well as some of the smaller ones, 
have good catalogs of attractive outdoor music. 
And it is up to you to make your music worth 
the price of admission to the show itself. You 
can do it, and make money in the bargain, 
provided you are not afraid to work bard. 


JACK DEMPSEY A COMPOSER 


Perhaps Jack Dempsey, heavyweight boxing 
champion of the world has grown envious over 
the way song writers gather in the sheckles 
without having to put in months of hard traine 
ing for them. Anyway, Dempsey is credited 
with having composed a march aN by himself. 
He put it together the other day, following 
his appearance at The New York Hippodrome. 
Jack dedicated the number to the sport writers 
of America. A. J. Goring, director of the Hip- 


podrome orchestra, is making the orchestration. 
Lieut-om. John Philip Sousa wired that if the 
march possesses any of the staying powers 
of the champion he will feature it during the 
coming season. 


RAMBLES IN RADIO 


Several publishers who were sounded con- 
cerning radio's effect on the music business, 
think it is going to benefit music rather than 
injure it. What many fear is that radio will 
cut into the sales of sheet music and phono- 
graph records. They have an idea that because 
@ person is able to hear a song over the radio- 
phone he will be less inclined to buy a copy of 
the song or a record of it. Reports have it that 
some of the phonograph companies fee] the 
same way about the matter. Several of them 
are reported to have instructed artists under 
contract not to sing over the radiophone. The 
companies think that if persons are permitted 
to hear the artists by radio they won't be sat- 
isfied with records and won't buy them. 

And yet, phonograps companies send their 
artists to sing in various parts of the country, 
and do so with the idea and hope of stimulating 
business. It is a paradox to say the least. 
When a person listens in on the radiophone he 
has to take what is offered. Tonight he may 
hear “Babbling Brook,”’ for instance, and like 
it well enough to want to hear it again. He 
may listen in every night for weeks before ho 
hears the number again. If he went to a show 
and heard the same song he would be up 


against the same conditions, The song grips — 


him end he wants it, and the only way to get 
it is to buy the sheet music or the record. 
The fact that ke hears a song by radio does not 
mean that he'll be satisfied, for if a person 
were Gatisfied with the mere hearing, there 


TWIN 
STAR 


SoH INTERNATIONAL $2, 


SONG 


HITS! 


, “REAL ys Ae 7 J = es 
PE MERS! _ 
A uses 


Our varicus Trade-Marks 
shall be “Quality” Signs, dis- 
tinguishing *‘Reajl Mus.c” from 
“Noise” and “Plagiarism.” 

Music can have Originality, 
“Pep.”’ Fox-Trot or “si pees 

ill 


al Music’ 
is the International Bridge. 
WARNING! Musio, Lyrics, 
Titties, Trade-Marks of all tn- 
ternational and American Hits, 
Desinns of *‘Real Music,”’ etc., 
a Duly Cepyrighted and Reg- 
red. Any _Unauthorized 
= oa Same will Be Prosecuted, 


No. 1 
SAL 
MAY 


No. 2 
No 
USE 
CRYING 


TWIN 
STAR 


Ste AMERICAN 32, 


xrrot HITS! 


NOW READY 
Artist Copies and Seng Or- 
chestrations for these 2 Inter- 
Matenal Hits and 2 American 


Hits—Free to ali recognized 
Pertormers. ers, 
each.) 

Finest Fox-Trot Arrange- 


ments of 2 International —2 
American Hits, including Sax- 
Ophones, 250 each (worth $1). 

Other Popular Dance Tunes: 
EDDIE LEONARD BLUES 
jaan ees U HONEY 


T BLUES 
WHO'LL BE THE NEXT ONE 
TEACHING ME 


E 1s 
Y ROSE 
25e EACH 


OD 
SWIMMIN 
HOLE 


No. 2 
THE 
LITTLE RED 


SCHOOL 
HOUSE 


EDW. B. MARKS MUSIC CO. 


NOW LOCATED IN OUR NEW BUILDING 
46TH ST. NEAR BROADWAY NEXT TON. V.A 


STREET 
ADDRESS 
" NECESSARY 


WE 
¥ Ted Leuis Classic 


ied 
. 


r 


Crete >» 


th 
Cone 


AL. OLSON 
The Fi nale Hit 3 


BOMBO 


= 


LOVE DREAMS | 


dhe Waltz of ¥ 
“Charm 


= 


q SPECIAL MATERIAL, § 
=? READY &~ 


S sesc NUMBERS 


FREE 
if you join our 


Club ; 
N 


) 


im Diet = 


is 


a 54 ee MARCH 18, 1922 
i SS —_—__ 
‘} Y JVM MMM | CMMMMMMM@M«wllll YY YY YL ¥ ~~ ' ¥ 
d ___—- — ; x | 
Hi x * ¥ |. 
a a an) at 
i 3 ( v | 
hl —— at 
i — ¥ ¥. 
: 3 L// ¥. | 
Oy 3 ‘ 
h'. Y MADE : 
a : 
iE : 
it | ; oo 
ie ; - 
- B =~ ¥ 
Tk ALD ED ¥ 
ih —__—___________I ok ia] ON aN : 
ep <5 rad sue oS 3 
: Ke PS § e 2 ? ry 7 OUCISS a ‘f 
: g B ar eed : 
RS ES App ; 
| fi rea 4 ae | ct ORID x v 
: : a 3 
i! 2 es 
— : 
eas 2 ee } 
at a e : 
2 al Y ¥ 
a DN 3 
N a 
RORY: ¥ 
Ge WW DANCE ~ 
9% \ NX ORCH. § 
i “ 2 OLR 95 ¢ 
%, ‘\ \ XN ~S 5 
os ‘ a ae) “Hp i 
t re BX SA NOS 
3 4 Rie . \ \ N ON 
@ 380 N iN ‘\ ‘ O 
. ” "2 
‘ 
a iii i iil | 


a ee 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The 


Billboard 55 


JUST THE 


CHORUS. Espressivo. 


{— _—- — Y ——~- 4 . 
i <——=== = fee et 
S = t as 
vu ° 
| Chl ...xccninapammnee GUE REED - Oy ——— Youmake me glad 
Ar iain r _— ~>;- r 4 _— 
he —- 2 a —— 
> T T ———— v T 
youmake me sed... ee eS bring back the hours. 
. 1 ——— 
41- ——— a” _ tT -:- ~~ _ - — — 
p> — 2 —F— + es eee 2 ees ae — =: SS 
[ 1] used to spend in love - land's bow'rs Re -———- —-e 
— 
-_—— woe ty Ese — t 
——— Ss : j =. SI 
tae ; 
_ Yu wang. me back ne ®- gain, _____ Dreams that can 
* 1. ne 
— zz z- —" t ~~ 


—- = t = -=—- eS 
7 .s — t 


; 
tt ~ 
t 


~ = ~ . : —— 
__ t t ; z 


Please dort 


my 
haunt me, 


* ¥ T ' 
Please dort taunt me Oh, my 


rv “ Uz} 
_—_s = @ 


VER SINCE YOU a 
TOLD ME YOU CARED «: 


THE SONG THE BREEZE SINGS 10 HE 


A BEAUTIFUL WALTZ NUMBER 
Dealers Write For Prices — Orchestrations, Professional Copies Free to Performers 


CHORUS=3 SONG HITS=TRY THEM 


SWEET MELODY 


SURE FIRE FOX TROT 


Zz t 
Se. ersteeeyeetene sateen loved we, 


SSS Sa <=; 


_— a: 


All theworld’s a-giow with 


cisa- cose py 


A NOVELTY 


=< 
t x x 
— = 
_—- - = 3 
+ z 7 os 
T 


+ 
= = 
= 
. 


Ls 
all the lit. 


tle joys of life, dear, thrill ge 


+ 
+ 
« 


FOX TROT HIT 


—— 
PR ereicce youtold me that yeu 


ev Srolace youtelé wethat yes cared. 


caredws, 


cHoRTvS 


= SSS == ti 
Some-bod- yo thinh-ing of you 


se 
Some-one cares @orethap you {now — 


a = = SPSS SES Se 


Some-oue wants yoo for hip weet beart Mur-mer the seph-ers thet blow eee 

7 esa ie SS 52525 SS 

Somobod-y> @reamsare of ro Far e-way tho’ he may be Someore © 
ta) "4 re ’ 


cme one loves you Thug’ the asag thas Go teuneingete 


E. FORTUNATO, PUBLISHER 9 SOUTH oth ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


As introduced by 
GIORGIO PASSILIA’S 
Ambassador Orchestra 


AnD 
MOOK 


The new, weird fox-trot ballad hit. 
“i'M SO UNLUCKY” 


Great fox-trot blues. 


“ONE SWEET SMILE” 


Ray Miller's Favorite. 


© ane 1a $1. .0O 


CLUB 
for 6 months’ trial 


DANCE ORCH., 25¢ EACH 
REGULAR COPIES, 30c¢ EACH 


f CAINE, INC. 


145 W. 45th Street 
NEW YORK 


would be no sheet music business. A person 
buys a song or a record because the thing grips 
him, because he can’t get away from it. And 
once a song gets him he wants to take 
it home and play it, sing it, or listen to it 
until he gets tired of the piece, If he were 
satisfied with hearing it once or twice, he 
would do so at a show and forget about it. 

The big feature about radio is that it will en- 
able publishers to introduce new songs tothe pub- 
lic within a week, instead of months as for- 
merly. At present there are many thousands 
listening in at the concerts, and when broad- 
casting stations are erected in other parts of 
the country, the publishers, by having men at 
the various ones, will be able to sing to addi- 
tional numbers every night. <A set of pluggers 
who would cover half a dozen picture houses 
in a night and sing probably to ten thousand 
people, will be able to reach many times that 
amount vio the radie, 

“Do the radio fans ever buy any of the music 
they bear by radio?* a publisher asked the 
other day. 

J. Andrew White, who ts in charge of the 
station at Newark, N. J., answers that ques- 
tion without any dificulty: 

“We receive more than two thousand letters 
every week from people telling how much they 
enjoy the concerts. And, without exaggerating, 
I'll say that at least fifty per cent want to 
know where they can buy the sheet music or the 
records of the new songs they have heard. 
Hearing a new good song over the radio sim- 
ply creates a desire to hear it again in their 
own homes.”* 

One prominent phonograph company kept 
track of all the business it did for a month 
thru the radio. The concern made a separate 
record of the goods it sold thru people coming 
in to say they wanted such and such a record, 
having heard the song for the first time over 
the radiophone. At the end of the month the 
books showed that radio had brought an addi- 
tional $50,000. 


K. B. MANSELL PLEASED 


K. B. Mansell, publisher, Wheeling, W. Va., 
writes that he is pleased by the way his latest 
release, “Don't Build a Wall Around the Girl 
You Love,”’ is being received. It will be 
recorded by two phonograph companies in April, 
Mr. Mansell says, and to date has brought 
offers from two New York publishers. ‘‘In re- 
sponse to our last advertisement in The Bill- 
board,"’ he states, “‘we received more than four 


Zm <Prev OF AHD—1 MD FOZ wM=—VON «mH 


HEY - YOU!I! JUST A MINUTE - PLEASE!! 
You Can “STAND PAT” Anywhere With This “HAND” 


“BUILDING LOVE CASTLES” Fox Trot Song 


By Ray Sherwood 


“LONESOME LIPS” Song Fox Trot Serenade 


By Ray Sherwood and Margie Kelly 


“JAPANESE SAILOR” Oriental Fox Trot Song 


By C. P. McDonald and Thomas Hughes 


“FATEEMA” Oriental Fox Trot Song 


By C. P. McDonald and Thomas Hughes 
“BESHEBARA” Oriental Fox Trot Song 
By C. P. McDonald and Thomas Hughes 


The last three were Sensational Hits at the Annual Ball 
and Show, “A NIGHT: IN THE ORIENT,” of the 
Advertising Club of New York City. 


VANDERSLOOT WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 


2 oa mrad roPm Y YZO—-APDANMIOVO MOZPO 


MUSIC PUB. CO. 645 Glst ST., BROOKLYN, N. ¥ 


THANK YOU) ae 


“OH, JANE!” 


%*& (Have You Seen Her?) 


INTRODUCED BY 
IRENE JEFFERIES 
Cc. JEFF MALINGS 
We Then Seseune cnqusia ted—all eligibles invited. There will be 
NEW ENGLAND MUSIC CO. 
East Hampton, Mass., U.S. A. 


; 
? 
: 
& 


: —— , 
Sr i 
i 
ee 
ie, | 
Hi 
| 
ee wi 
-— ———__ __ thy 
Yo oe er bo | 
is pret - ty haunt. ing mel i a: amt a ‘i id 
_ P-S ) 
a —— ee ee 
Ev - ersiace seeeete we that yoo 
=>.= 
: — a 
SS SS 
I nev~ erseemedto share ‘ 
1 2 
SSS SS SS SSeS SSS Ee 
loved we 
— 
ee : 7 ee ( 
ee 7S SS = SS SS SS STE SS SES SSS SES SS ESSE SSS 
i - ee 
: i 
| 
i i 
| ny | 
' Ih 
| oe 
\ Bett 
4h . 
sig . 
“= a eH Me 
Wanna =- ------------------------- — i ‘ 
he aa 
eth, ite 
rey ae 
- et 4 
bib bi 
Gi 4 
, ih 
s ih ti 


The 


ANN IX 


SWPP ww "5 


WX 


. Wo AX 
MS MSN AY 


TRIANGLE 
SONG HITS 


THRILLS 


A Beautiful Fox Trot Ballad 
By EUGENE WEST 


CAROLINA 
BLUES 


A Sensational “BLUES” Rumber 
By DAVE RINGLE 


ON THE 
SUBWAY 


-AGreatComedySong (4ExtraChoruses 


NOT LATELY 


A Great Coon Character Song 


H The Last Song Bert Williams 
Positively Recorded For Columbia Records 


THE BELLE OF 
TIMES SQUARE 


The Greatest Sob Ballad on the Market 
Featured by SOPHIE TUCKER 


GG 


MQ 
SS 


QA AOA MMA Gg 


WS 
MA 


TH 


YAN 


\\ 
SW 


SEES 


SS WG SN S 
MAA ANNOMNH WNW 


SN 


S 


ee 


S 
S 


MG 


SS 


~ 


~ 


SS 


TRIANGLE 


Music Pub. Co. 
1658 BROADWAY _ NEW YORK 


\ ' 
WY AGG{C AK MG W988 XA J 


Send For Your Copies Now — 
Orchestrations, 25 cents each © 


4, 
Uy, 


4 


SS 


NS 
SSS 


MAA 


SW 
\\ 


WS 
SSS 


\ 


X\ 


Wy 


NK 


AS 


» 


JZ @irectly or indirectly to pay a tax. If the so- 
% ciety can put this plan thra the music busi- 
J, ness will be a gold mine, 
7, have to worry about bits as they do now. You 


V7, United States, at its regular quarterly meet 
¢ ing in the Astor Hotel, 


SS 
\ 


MOQAgg 


\ 
WS SS 


SS WS 


NS 


SQ 
MM AQ 


SS 


WWW VV 
N WN AN 
WH 


WH 


ee oe oh ? ww 


Jz, Orpheum and Loew houses paid the tax. And 
4, §f these firms should fail in line every motion 
i, picture house in the country would follow suit. 
Yj, Word came out the other day that one of the 


Z courts over the tax question, the society feels 


4 increased business one hundred per cent for the 


hundred requests from performers for copies 
of this number. One request came from Shang- 
hai, two from Borneo, and six from Sydney, 
Australia. Some of the prominent singers now 
using the song are Ruth Olidence, of Zurrow’s 
‘Classy Steppers’; Prof. Harry Lewis and the 
Maryland Sisters.” 

L. ©. Smikahl’s nine-piece orchestra of Sioux 
City, Iowa, is featuring the number and fe- 
ports it is going as well as any number there. 


WHERE’S THE MONEY? 


The other day a certain publisher asked an- 
other if be could tell him what becomes of the 
money collected by the Authors’ and Composers’ 
Society. The man who was quizzed id he 
did not know any more about it than the next 
man, The society has been in existence for 
some years, but the publisbers, according to 
one publisber, have received very little, -Re- 
cently the Class A members of the Music Pub- 
lishers’ Protective Association were reported to 
have received $1,100 which, the publisher de- 
clared, was the first they had been given in 
the—well as far back as he can recall, The 
amount turned over to Class B and Class C 
was a great deal less. 

A list submitted to publishers by the society 
showed that the society had close to 4,000 in- 
dividuals and firms paying the tax on music, 
the amounts ranging from ten dollars a year 
up. Some pay $500 and more every year for 
the privilege of playing music controlled by 
the society. What becomes of the money is 
what puzzles some publishers. 

The Authors’ and Composers’ Society is mak- 
ing a fight to compel every theater, movie 
house, dance hall, cabaret, hotel and, in fact, 
every one who uses its music, to obtain revenue 


Goodman & Rose 
HITS 7 


“PVE GOT MY 
HABITS ON” 


(FOX-TROT) 


ANOTHER paaK rown STRUTTERS: 


NOW ea FEATURED BY 
LLES HEADLINERS 


“YOUVE HAD 
YOUR DAY” 


A FOX. TROT THe ‘co Gurney 1s SWEEPING 


VAUDE. 


JUST OFF THE PRESS 


“ATTA BABY” 


THE Ort geenae SONG IN A 


A SONG AND DANCE SENSATION. 


“BAMMY” 


(LAND THAT GAVE ME cower, 
BY HE WRITERS OF o 
Ml (3 A BEAUTIFUL pie, RAG 
BALLAD 


“IN YOUR EMBRACE” 


A enon: CLASS Rone v eg THAT WILL LIVE 


“WHO'LL BE THE 
7 NEXT ONE” 7 


(TO CRY OVER YOU) 
PROFESSIONAL COPIES AN COPIES AND eae OR. 


Publishers will not 
can readily see the big profits that would ac- 
crue if all the Keith, Shubert, Fox, Pantages, STILL A TERRIFIC WIT 
TIONS OF ALL 
ABOVE HITS READY. 
ORCHESTRA CLUB $200 1A CLUB $200 PER YEAR 


GOODMAN & ROSE, Inc. 


222 W 46TH ST. new YORK 


big vaudeville circuits is getting ready to fall 
in line and pay the regular yearly tax. 

The society is also considering the radio mat- 
ter. Judging by the success it has had in the 


confident of finally compelling every ope te 
come across. 


THEATERS ADOPT MAN’S SONG 


Recently the theater 
Beach, Cal., 


managers of Long 
held a go-to-the-theater week and 


week. As a feature song, the theater mana- 
gers adopted “After Sundown," published by 
the West Coast Music Company, of Long Beach, 
The boost created quite a demand for the num. 
ber, which was written by EB, L. Frick. 


PUBLISHERS MEET 


The Music Publishers’ Association of the 


Theatrical Piano 


New York, discussed Bate p yin piano that will add to the thrill and 


Small, interest ting. udiences 
(Continued on page 68) see ant hear etn. fascinating. | Aud 
@t its full, rich. powerful tone. 


Just 3 feet, «i inches high. 4 Sest, én inches wits: 


Weighs only Two carry 
Player looks nid co the on Takes up little 
ae on stage or in orchestra pit. 


A well-made, high-grade instrument, which be 
cause of its excellence is used for music jnstruc 
tion in schools throughout America, 


PA bt catalog and special prices to the the 


The Miessner Piano Co. 


Dept. C, 228 3d Street, MILWAUKEE, WIS, 


Tee 


PLEARN PIANO4 


IN ‘on minK 


By the qiches and easiest system 
in the World. Teaches you all 
tricks and pointers for playing cor- 
tect BASS, which is just what = 
need. Anyone can leara ia aw 
Write F. W. LITTLE, Box 38, 
Arsecal Sta, Pittsburgh, Pa. 


A SUCCESS 


It is the song you have 
been looking for. | 
Professional material a 

Orchestrations (full), 2¢. 
. Write or wire for your copy. , 


ANSON C. JACOBS, 


MUSIC PUBLISHER, . 
- Orpheum Theatre Building, 
FRANKLIN, PA 


—, 


THREE PUBLISHERS WANT 


“| Want You Dear Heart To Want Me" 


American Music Pub. Co. ey York, Davo added 
MARY &. HOPKING,” slew Market, Marviand. 


| 7 | @:@ 
a 56 fm Biltiboaeard MARCH 18, 1922 
a 
——_—_—__e—e— 
j , YY 
é 
| j Yy 
| 4 @w 
a} YY 
af Se ————————————————————— 
/ Yi Y 
Hf 4 
un y Yj 
“Fed y) Wy 
bes 4 2 
at * 4 ee Gy 
a 4 RE IE ER REY ATEN TAINS TS A RSS TEREST emer: 
iT 7 Oe 
' j ® 4 Y 
1s Yy , 
f Yj ; Yy 
Hig 7 ZY 
{ee Y : 
| 
a WY 
ee y 
4 : > Y y 
Ve UY Yy 
Z 
] YY Y 
Y Ys 
G STR Re oF 9A eS By 
2 aT ee weeeEse ss cme ee 
i a ie 
; Yy : —__ =-n 
| i" ee Z The fm an; 
. ) YY Yy . 7 | 
if E Small ——ee 
i. a m 
Wi : es 
| Y | 
«a re 
Y “4 re . 
a Yj I  — ; A 
_ TE (LL AD FOX-TROT 
Hit: : Z Z “ eT. ae oa i i on 
— y «di eee | ~oe : 
. Z YY : 
Ly YY, Yip ' ; 
Y | 
i H | | 
jj Z | 
WY, 7) 
YY Y 
y \ A, 
; Yj, ‘ 
FE Yj hada - ee 
| r @ ye | . 
/ |. G | 
> ey 
\ i is a 
"AS 


my 
8 
Sing A 
Feist Song 
Be aA 
Stage Hit . 


-~ 


—_—=, 


ht 


a the trees, 
re, 


Ve «sug 


j 


you're creep - ing. 


hear them in 
your shrine fm kneel-in 
CHICAGO 


Grand Opera House Building 


MINNEAPOLIS 
12 Lyric Theatre Building 


Now dear I 
#8, New York 
r 
PHILADELPHIA 
1228 Market St. 
: KANSAS CITY 
- Gayety Theatre Building 
LOS ANGELES 
417 West Fifth St. 


Near me 


1 
with-out a warn-ing from 


Some-bod-y$ smil - ing aow, 


ing at 
Rese 


140 Charing Cross Rosd 
193 Yonge St. 


le from your Des 


wy 


Pp oa nee 
> Inc., Feist Buildin 
right Secured and 
and for Band. Orchestra,e 


Se 
& Hunter 138- 


Canada, Leo, Feist Limited, 


Song-birdsare sing + tng of you, 


Inc. 


Some-one ts star’- 


Long have! sought you, 


y RAidd F | 
by LEO. FEIST. 
Day 


> 


International Co 
+ Bngland, Francis, D: 
e Machine or Player Piano 


t MCMXX1 
Toronto 


on the breeze, While Eo am slee 
=> 


Copyrigh 


“ing 
t you steal-ing m 


one 1s glar + 
y who 


-bod- 


Love they are Dring - 17 
CHORUS Zeuderty 


Their sony up- 
=. 
ten-der feel 
tha 


Some- 
Some 


agement 
PBANK E. BARRY 7 


Revised Arran 


v 
bs 
a 
-) 
= 
0 
9 
£ 
in 


71 1 Seventh Ave., New York 


LEO FEIST 


; 


AN ALL ROUND HIT 


ling 


BOSTON 
161 Tremont Strect 
DETROIT | 
144 West Larned St. 
TORONTO 
193 Yonge Street 


SAN FRANCISCO 
Pantages Theatre Building 


Appea 
DOUBLES 

MALE AND FEMALE 
IT NOW 


SINC IT NOW 
*s Your Copy 


An 
GREAT 
KEEPS THEM 
STEPPING | 
CET 


Here 
You Can | 
Co Wrong 
» With A 

. Feist Song 


MARCH 48, 1922 Ss? Bae 
I 
Pa “ yet} 
0 : ans bh] 
; : Hi \ 
. 2 ; ' ; 
\ is 
| } = i 
: . : . if 
; 
. ay Ne 
7 STEALING Ce a 
. Fox Trot T DAN SULLIV. 
a ' ox Trot empo_ vo T. a os - we 
) Sue re a ee ice ssa St 22 FP SSiseSseers sei a= =: 
/dee fT EE ever 4 
4 ya > > ‘ 
| Gus iS Se a Ss SSS SS = SS SSS 
‘py b y Ee 4 b id BP : . 4 — 4 be P PEFFF e _ . “ ie 
a 2 4 . : 
ee Mey dear, 
éear, 
a ee <n a —— er ee ee 
Gus ST fe Sr Sr Sri SHS ETE paid gig 4-33 
° - 4 4 b y es? © > se 6 | 
7 ing 2, me. 
g from you. ; 
; ; ae = aa ae , i 
: = Piste te tee : 
~ “ = 
| 
a E ey 
: ay A 
“ | | 
SS = : ich 
‘ - —_-_- a Ld 
ae | 
’ it 
——_—— - —— _ = J i 
eee es 7 i 
: i 
morn *- e aby is iff 
4 > ; { 
: 
== — | 
ves SS a 
, Ive caugh if 
London ) 
al | 
= i 
Lae 
ins 
Het 
| f \ 
r- - = 


ct) RS Sed Eo 


~~ A ‘ye 


se 
5 


The Billboard MARCH 18, 1922 


QNNUUUEUOUNUOOENONCHOONDOUDENEOOUDDONO OOD OUEUOOCCOUCOUCEEUCTOOOTOEESOOS 


“GIRLS! WHY DO 


“nuff 
“Venetian Blues” 


Dreamy ‘Vaitz Song 


Just Released—Speaks for Itself 


1) YOU HESITATE? 


by 
EDWIN TILLMAN 


«éLove’s isle’’ 


PUCUUCCEEU EEC UECOECOCCUUCU TEE EEOUERECEEEEECERCEEUUERTEREOOUEOTEECEEUEEODSEU DEUTER EEO EEUOEEO EEE EEO EEE 
NEW 1922 FOX-TROT BALLAD 


’'LL LOVE YOU 
DAY AFTER DAY 


When My Shoes Wear 
Out From Walking I'll 
Be On My Feet Again 


oo ONE-STEP SONG 
TROPICAL BLUES CARING FOR YOU 


FOX-TROT SONG WALTZ SONG 


TO MAKE ME HAPPY MONDAY LAUGHING 


JUST GIVE ME MY SUNDAY str 
Full Orch. and Piano, including Saxophones, 25c Each 


(2 Orch. Leaders, be sure to get these ¢ >> Vaudeville Singers, send for Prof. Copy. 
CHAS. E. ROAT MUSIC CO., Battle Creek, Mich. 


PUGLOEUUEEUUEEGUDEAUSESCCERDERASEEEUEEEEEOUEEOO CREO EEEUT EEO TERO TEE REEO CERO TERETE EES 


Published By 
Professionz! Material FREE | TILLMAN MUSIC co.| To Recognized Performers 


Milwaukee, Visconsin 


soveenceveecouueneqneseceecaguanonunsnnnnsesenncnnyqouo4snsnenntifg 


wl 


7 ~TRE-MEN-DOUS HIT 
“ODEON THEATRE, MARCH 4 


2,000 PEOPLE | 


‘MY ROSE I ONLY YOU 


Sok ah -WALTZ-BALLAD Eenen 
akes its place with the most. beautiful Waltzes of all time. 


PRICE, 26c AT DEALERS; 27c ra Mab ira 
_ORCHESTRATIONS, 30c = 
Piano Profecaicnal and Orvhestra- 


| JOBBERS ‘AND DEALERS, 
Hone: sian a “WRITE FOR PRICES. - 


-MID-WEST PUBLISHING co. 


1907 WESTERN AVENUE, CINCINNATI, OHIO. 


Cc. G. CONN, Ltd. 


WORLD’S LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF _ 
GRADE BAND AND ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTS. 
We have recently opened two more branches: 
CLEVELAND CONN CO., 1220 Huron Road. CHICAGO CONN CO., 62 E. Van Buren St. 


c. G. Conn, Ltd., is represented in every large city, and our agencies are prepared to give immediate 
service to all traveling vaudeville and tyceum artists. 


NEW YORK CONN CO., 233-7 W. on ot. NORTHWEST CONN CO., vas Ave., , 
DETROIT CONN CO., 243 E. Grand River SOUTHERN CONN &; st? 


ne, New Orleans, 
McDOUGAL CONN CO., 29 Tenth St., Portlan 
Drop 2 line for details, ~dag B. ELKHART, IND. 


WORTH WHILE SONGS 
ALABAMA BALL (Fox Trot) 
BACK TOG THE SWEET LONG AGO (Waltz Ballad) 
HE PICKED A WILD FLOWER (Comedy One Step) 
Orchestrations and copi2zs FREE to Leaders and Singers. 
GET YOURS NOW 


YOUNG MUSIC PUB. CO. Columbus, Ohio 


PUBLISHERS MEET 
(Continued from page 56) 
the National Bureau of Advancement of Music, 
general conditions in the music industry and 
some phases of the copyright law. In June 
the association will hold the annual meeting, 
at which dealers from all parts of the coun- 


M0-NA- LI) 
try will get together for thélr regular yearly 


conclave. SU NG BY 


_Secoursenes . |CLIFE EDWARDS 


no one will accept, much less buy. Then they (UKULELE IKE) 
devote other years to informing their fellow- 

men that editors, or at least a majority of 

them, are a bunch of’ dumb-bells. Even Edgar PLAYED BY 


Allan Poe had his troubles finding markets for 


a 
his peoms, and when be did find a buyer he 
did not receive much, Fifteen dollars is what 
be is supposed to have been paid for “The 
Raven.” 


Halpin O’Reilly Gilbert, however, has found 


magazine editors a little more responsive. Miss 
Gilbert, by the way, is a popular song writer, 
having composed ‘‘The Short Dress Ball,"”” pub- 
lished by Will Rositter; ‘Sweet Alice Gray,”” 


put out by the Meyer Cohen Music Company, 
and several other pieces. 


Miss Gilbert comes from Louisville, Ky., 
where she used to contribute verse occasionally 
to the newspapers. Last Christmas she wrote 
a poem to her dad, J. Halpin O'Reilly, who 
still lives in Louisville, and after mdfing it WINTER GARDEN 


showed a copy to a friend who suggested that 
she submit it to one of the well-known maga- 


zines. The frst editor who saw it accepted 


the poem. | 
Not to be outdone, J. Halpin O'Reilly, after 
receiving the poem from his daughter, sat , 
—— 


down and, altho ke had never written a poem 
before, penned one to his daughter. Miss Gil- 


bert thought it too good to put aside and sub- " 
mitted it to a prominent magazine. The editor SEND FOR YOUR COPY 
wrote her he thought it was wonderful and, 

after making a few inquiries concerning its 


originality, sent her a check for almost twice (Quartette Arr. Now Ready) 


as much as Poe received for his ‘‘Raven.** 
Can you beat it? Imagine the feelings of any 


unappreciative genius who happens to read this, 
especially if he lives in Greenwich Village. 9 ne. 


Perhaps it may pay you to tackle the maga- 


ine edi h f 
Publishers to come acrost,  ™™* 1701 Tth Ave. New York City 


MUSIC EN™ ENGRAVERS AND PRI PRINTERS | 


ca ~ Es > Estimates > 
Music F pargest 


\ Gladly Furnished 
West of New York . = 


ANY PUBLISHER ~22=a—= on Any thing in Music 
OUR REFERENCE ~ 4 geek Gas WORK DONE BY 


ALL PROCESSES 
. DALHEIM & Co 054-2060 W.Lake St..Chicago.!}] 


GREAT DEMAND ™ SONGS 


make @ success of marketing your own composition al points is published. a 
tain ons Se oases <a 1 including lists of yh -cent Be ~ fecord os vem ya 
. ealers, musica] magazines, times boo 

$1.00, postpaid, and if not as claimed will refund Lt AF = tail. kal 


JACK GORDON PUB. C0., 201 No. Hoyne Wve., Chicago 


SOMEBODY STOLE MY GAL 


B 
DENTON & HASKINS MUSIC Go,” P! copy and orchestration PREB 14) oo sssay ew vork, 


—— -—- 


eee] ___ 

‘if 
— 

- ‘ 
is 

a 
ae : 
i , 
| 

in 6 

ib Pare 

ll wZJhiiit 

i ey * - 

ee 

a 

| a Se (AND HIS BAND 
| ode 
A ee 
| payne 7 

: ee 
q ee eee 
i 

jp SC; 

| ‘ a 

| 

Wai ia | | 


MARCH 18, 1922 


aa 


The Billboard 


In 


by Albert E. Short— Musical Dredor DivereThastre. 


Novelty Foxtrot Ballad 


(SSG) 


by W. R.Williams and Clarence M. Jones. 


Note! Greatest 
Orch. 25 cts. 


Will Rossiter, The Chicado Publisher, 30 W. 0 W. Lake St CHICAGO. 


Beautifully Heduetat ie abban/ Kerr Wonder a 


reatest Dance Orch. in America to-day 
Bets. NEW CATALOG_FREE. 


Just Invented!! 
A Most Wonderful Aid to 


“Little Wonder”’ 


RHYMING 
DISC 


(Fully Copyrighted) 


Place word to be rhymed on 
the “LITTLE WONDER’— 
turn the disc and the rhyming 
words are right before you. 
Positively a miracle worker 
for song writers, 


SAXONETTE 


A Good Saxophone Imitation 


Pat. Apr. 22, 1919. 


Made of Polished Brass 


Cornet, 7 = 
$3.50. Trombone, $4.50. — or, oe 


MAGIN-MAYER CO., Belleville, Il. 


Have You a Copy of the song 
“THE MIDNIGHT HOUR” 


It is kindred to the “Glory Song,” 
which everybody knows. Sample by 
mail, postpaid, for 20c. Address 


JAS. T. UTTLEY, Kitchener, Ont. 


SAY “I SAW IT IN THE BILLBOARD,” 


BASS NOTES 


“Lonesome City Blues,’ by Chas. H. Lewis, 
of Kansas City, is being featured by Moran 
and Mack,, Leona Fox and Henry Sentry'’s 
Symphonie Orchestra on the Orpheum Time. 

Jor2:n S. Murphy and Harry Wallon have 
written a new song, “If There’s a Radio Sta- 
tion in Heaven (Mother Send a Message to 
Me),"" which will shortly be released by the 
Browne Music Company. 

Leo Fenway, of Boston, has written a new 
number called ‘Rainbow of Love.” 

Word has been sent to the management of 
the Madison Square Garden that unless it quits 
playing to a few publishers, in the matter of 
letting them plug songs during the six-day 
bicycle races and other events, it will have 
to pay a regular tax of $1,000 a year. 

William ©. Noll, publisher, New York City, 
has landed his latest release, ‘Good Stuff,"* 
with a raft of well-known orchestras thru 
the country. 

Song pluggers who get an opportunity to 
boost numbers via radio will do well to pay 
more attention to their enunciation. 


Louis Breau, composer of ‘‘Humming” and “TI 


* Want My Mammy,” thinks there is nothing 


like radio for boosting songs. And Breau keeps 
after radio stunts at every opportunity. Last 
week he arranged to have the Empire State 
Novelty Six play his two new numbers at the 
broadcasting station at Newark, N. J. What's 
more, Breau fixed matters so that couples in 
Terrace Garden could dance to “Kiss Me by 
Wireless” and ‘‘Mo-Na-Lu,"”’ also coming from 
Newark via the radiophone, 


J. Louis MacEvoy, manager of the Broadway 
Music Publishing Company, Spokane, Wash., 
sends word that he has taken over the distrib- 
uting agency for the Pacific Coast for “‘Sway- 
ing,”’ ‘Minnie from Minneapolis,"* ‘In Santa 
Fe,”’ and ‘‘Love’s Day,”” which are published by 
the Chenette Publishing Company. MavEvoy 
says that Chenette’s ad. in the Billboard in- 
duced him to give the songs a trial. Finding 
that they sold readily, he ordered in fifty lots 
and is now getting them by the thousand. 

Sophie Tucker has gathered a constellation 
of Broadway stars to help her at Reisenweber’s 
to swell the Jewish Relief Fund. Ever since 
the war Miss Tucker has been starring in drives 
and funds to help poor folk, and she is eome 
helper. 


It is not necessary to copyright a song be- 
fore submitting it to a publisher; not if you 
offer your work to a regular publisher. If a 
publisher thinks it is worth stealing he will 
think it is worth buying. And if some one did 
want to steal your idea a copyright would not 
stop him, 


Robert W. Luders and Will J. Ellsworth, 
salesmen for the McKinley Music Company, are 
touring New York and Pennsylvania on a plug- 
ging and selling trip. They will cover the 
trade, moving picture houses, orchestras an@ 
theaters, and feature ‘In California With You” 
and “‘Broken-Hearted Blues."* 


Nat Sanders, formerly professional man for 
several big publishers, is now devoting most of 
his time to writing songs, and is collaborating 
with Louis Rreau, composer of ‘‘Humming.”’ 

Arthur Brothers’, writers and publishers, of 
Detroit, are formulating plang to hook up 
local advertising with their sheet music sales. 


Now Being Played and Sung from 


COAST to COAST 


and from 


CANADA TO THE CANAL ZONE 


After meaeien : 


zeo0zcn wm-AnD> 
zsouzcn wman>d 


L 
= + =: t — 
t ==. | 
za — i t ; 
—— 7 
Spell - ing. a world of fun 
a | 4 
-—F— — SS ST 
s + £5344 torr te 
t'? 2 SIS ! 
4 ee j—d-yd- 
roa = —<: - 
— ro ————-—-: 
== 2S = + 
+ t —-- 


Ale Geto. 3 


MENCERY by £4 1 Pri Long Baa 0 
‘Sdukaeous 


CARRIES A POTENT MESSAGE 
DELIVERS IT WITH A PUNCH 


(AND—OH BOY!! SOME CLIMAXII)) 


The outstanding song hit of a number of Shows and Acts. Fea- 
tured by leading Theatre, Hotel and Dance Orchestras Every- 
where. Endorsed by Theater Managers’ Associations. Slides? 
yes. Professional material FREE to Recognized Performers. 


DANCE ORCHESTRATIONS, 25c 


WEST COAST MUSIC CO. 


PUBLISHERS 


LONG BEACH, -= = © e e CALIFORNIA 


EMBOUCHURE 

(Pronounced ahn-boo-shure) is “That property of 
the jip that®permits the playing of a wind instru- 
ment with ease. control ‘and power accommoda- 
tion.” LASH’'S LIP RELIEF 
helps in acquiring am embouchure and*maintaining 
it. An oimtment of highly remedial virtue for 
Sore Lips. Tender Lips, Weak Lips, Cracks and 
Chafing. Toughens and hardens the lips, improves 
the embouchure, strenvthens the muscles, Pre- 
vents chappine and swelling. keeps the lips in 
splendid condition. Nice to use. does not spread 
all over the face. Of great assistance to - a 
layets, amateur or professional. By mail, 
ASH'S PHARMAC? tock Athens. ‘Oo. 


Phoenix 


THEY’RE PLAYING IT EVERYWHERE 


BEAUTIFUL HONDOHULA 


¢ Walts Ballad. a wonderful @ance number. March release of Wurlitzer Automatic Rolls, 
ohio no Ralls for Player Pian 
Piano Copies, 25c. Professional copy free. Orchestrations now ready. Dealers and Jobbers write. 


RUCH MUSIC PUBLISHING COMPANY 


1541 RACE STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO 


SONG WRITERS 


Muste arranged at reasonable prices, 
YOUNG MUSIC PUB. CO., 


Columbus, Ohio, So ict me send you a 


prgincens “YOU'VE SMILED ALL THE WHILE” 


Is the song you want, the song you need, the will sing, the very song 2. ee 
a professional copy.’ Write © “°° “'" ‘HAMPTON. P. O- Box SI 


— RIES Fe 
SE ee 


‘ ee | 59 abi 

is ray Ti? Will Rossin #25000% Song HE (( 4” ) ty 

eevier ati) tat ie JAR | 

_ dal 

LOVE DAYS | 

l | 

a 7 ae | 

| Song | | 

° 

Writers | 
ae ' 

mie — — = - ) | 
DUNBAR MUSIC CO. — ee | 
— | 
a ee 
iene gi ee 
a 
a i 

Seamer” A 

iH 


MARCH 18, 1922 


~ «SWEET 
NORAH DALY” 


Peer of Irish love ballads. This 
harmonious number brings you the 
direct favor of your audience and 
gets you the encore. 


“TF WT MAKES ANY 
DIFFERENCE TO YOU" 


Sensational Waltz Ballad. 


Sung by Big Headliners. 
Played by Leading Orchestras, 


“IN CANDYLAND 
WITH YOU” | 


rj , The Btitiboard 


Taken Over From MARY M. HOPKINS’ 


Wl eweqsrgecramra “1 WANT YOU DEAR HEART TO WANT ME” 
SHAE Sf “MY HEART IS MORE THAN YOUR GOLD CAN BUY” 


By Everett J. Evans, Wm. Witol and Emma Rennie 


in| a ete 


i eal \" WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN" 


Ballad Supreme—By Louis W. Kiemme 
“TWILIGHT SHADOWS” | ‘““MARY-ANNA”’ 
“GYPSY LADY I LOVE YOU” 


‘‘ PLEASE DON’T ASK ME WHY” 
Professional Copies and Vocal Orchestrations (in all keys) FREE to the Trade. 
NOW IN ITS THIRD BIG EDITION, Wire—Send for yours Today—WVrite 


\ 


J 


a ae ee a eS | 


AD | SIX ORCHESTRATIONS FREE AND TWO EACH MONTH—ONE EVERY 15 DAYS—IF YOU JOIN OUR 


BSCRIPTION FREE AND THE $2.0 RETURNED, NAMES OF THE LUCKY LEADERS WILL BE 
PUBLISHED IN A LATER ISSUE, WATCH FOR IT! SEND YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW!! 


1658 


Broadway, NEW YORK CITY 


CLUB NOW. DUES ONLY $2.00, EVERY (0TH MUSICIAN JOINING WILL RECEIVE ONE YEAR'S 
AMERICAN MUSIC PUBLISHING CO., 


oar ik eee a ae 


« AS VAN Wi KLE 


_ $ Save Embarrassment and Expense | 


Carry a Barry Outfit and You Can Get By Anywhere. 
Our Bass and Snare Drum in a Case Size of Suit Case. 
‘Used By Up-to-the Minute Orchestras Everywhere. 


Send for Catalog “‘D” 


BARRY DRUM MFG. CO. 


3426 Market Street, Philadelphia Pa. 


‘ TELL 


We've Got It! Nothing Can Stop It!! 
SOME SONG!!! 


“SHE’S JUST A PLAIN 


OLD FASHIONED GIRL” 


The Song That’s Making a HIT From Coast to Coast 


Band arrangement by Alford. Ready this month. 
Get your Copies and Orchestrations NOW! 


STRAND MUSIC PUBLISHING CO., Lansing, Mich. 


UGUCHUUSUUAUSOLEERUSUOUOESECUUUUESUELEOUEEEEESOUOEEEOOOODSEGOOOEEEUUTOSEOOOGUSESEEEUETEPEETEOTOEEEED: 
rr eee er a 


ATTENTION, PROFESSIONALS! 


| __“FIRELIGHT DREAMS” 


erful tl t An E Gett 
ee eee Dept. B, 221 Wash. Ave. “Grecavilin Obie” 


PUTT Lb 
=a couaeueuuggnecgcsagnnecaaseace cee enann 


radio concert in Cincinnati, 
Moore a8 accompanying pianist, 


“LITTLE RED SCHOOLHOUSE” 
Proving New Song Success 


New York, March 10.—When Wilson & Bren- 
nan put over their famous “Swimming Hole” 
number they apparently worked up an appetite 
among performers for human nature songs. It 
took a Blakelock to paint Blakelocks and @ 
Corot to paint the indescribable charm of the 
feathery trees portrayed by Corot. And it re- 
ma‘ned for Wilson and Brennan to write another 
human nature song big enough to be called 
a successor to “Swimming Hole.”* 

The title, “Little Red School House,” speake 
for itself. Many acts have already rehearsed 
the new song in the new professional headquar- 
ters here of the Edward B. Marks Music Com 
pany, Forty-sixth street, next to the N. V. A. 

The Bennett Twins, the Crane Sisters and 
Elizabeth Ayres were the three who got off 
to a fiying start and introduced the number 
Grst at the Palace, the Royal and other Keith 
theaters, 


. HOW MASTERS WOULD PLAY 


POPULAR SONGS OF TODAY 


Los Angeles, March 11.—Henry B. Murtagh, ° 


solo organist of Grauman’s Million-Dollar The- 
ater, has proven that our popular dance tunes 
are the real thing in music and, but for a 
matter of time, might have been written by 
Wagner, Rimsky-Korsokoff, Schubert or other 
great masters. 

Mr. Murtagh took the popular “Wabash 
Blues” and by a change of harmonization and 
tempo showed how it might have been handled 
by Richard Wagner, Moszkowski, Rachmaninoff, 
Sousa or McDowell, 

Some of the descriptive slides read “How 
Moszkowski would have made a Spanish dance 
of this melody’ and “How Wagner would have 
made a Pilgrim chorus from the melodic theme 
of ‘Wabasch Blues’.” 

This musical innovation not only attracted 
the regular motion picture patrons, but many 
of the great musicians who are wintering here. 

They pronounced it a decided novelty in the 
musical world. Next week Mr. Murtagh will 
show how many of the famous masters would 
have written “Ain't Nature Grand,” the nove 
elty fox-trot published by Leo Feist, Inc. 


HEARD VAN AND SCHENCK ON 
RADIO AND OFFERS THEM JOB 


If Van and Schenck tire of the big time 
soon they stand @ good chance to land a 
job with the owner of a chain of motion pie- 
ture theaters in the Southwest. Said owner 
was listening in at the big wireless station at 
San Antonio, Tex., recently and heard “Wabash 
Blues’? sung by the famous vaudeville, “Follies” 
and phonograph record team at the broadcasting 
station of the Precision Equipment Company, 
Cincinnati, The distant movie magnate didn’t 
know just who Van and Schenck were, but 
he showed an ear for talent by writing the 
Cincinnaty firm: “When you are thru with 
the two fellows who sang ‘Wabash Blues® for 
you March 1, IT will be glad to heer from 
them. I feel sure that they could make good 


as singers in my theater down here.” 


Last week Billy White and James Ward, of 
the Feist staff, rendered “Stealing,” “Swanee 
River Moon,” “Ten Tittle Fingers and Ten. 
Little Toes’® and ‘“‘Thanks to You” at the 


with “Froggie”’ 


Big Stage Song for Single, Double 
and Soft Shoe Dancing. SOME fox. 
trot. You will need this in your act, 


“Dance Me On Your Knee” 


A Fox-Trot that is not backward 
about coming forward. GREAT 
Soubrette Number. 


“STOP LOOKING AT ME” 


Great Novelty One-Step and Com- 
edy Numbér. English chappie song, 
Gets you the glad hand. 


REGULAR COPIES, 25c. 


Professional Copies Now Ready. 
Order direct or thru dealers. 


5 JOIN OUR ORCHESTRA CLUB. 
Eight New Dance Orchestrations, $1, 
Single Numbers, 25c. 


ELIZA DOYLE SMITH 


59 E. Van Buren Street, 
| CHICAGO, . ILLINOIS, 


By Note or Bar. With or without music. Short 


PIANO JAZZ 
cane 


armon 

Hie ‘gitar 8 Sublet. ‘neludine Ba 
Jazz, wor 

FREE Special Offer, WATERMAN ite Saad 

258 Superba Theatre Bidg., Los Angeles, © 


20 SONG PARODIES, $1.00 


“TEN Lyne “FINGERS ” 


“oAbpER SME 

“WHEN SHALL We MEE tN 

“t AIN'T eMac DARLIN one 
“ALL BY MYSELF.” 


iat * pd S BABY.” 


TRA How v TBeuieve iN YOU." 
and ten other funny ones, all \for One Dollas 


OTTIE COLBURN 
13 Clinton Ave., Brockton, Mass. 


NOW BEING FEATURED BY THE LEADING 
ORCHESTRAS 


“CALLING YOU BACK TO ME” 
The beautiful Waltz Song b Chertes Durham 
READY INA Fe W DA 
The Wonderful Oriental Fox. Arrot 


“INDIA AND _—. 
Lyrics C. Durham. Music b 
These Songs oF Orchestrations for “Jo at all 
Dealers, or sent direct by the Publishers on receipt 
250 cock, Tne STAR MUSIC CO., 16 Lambert 
Boston, Massachusetts. 


STANDARD PRINTING CO. 


MUSIC PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS AND 
LITHOGRAPHERS 


214-216 MORGAN STREET 
OLIVE 8188 ST. LOUIS, MO. 


MUSIC 
ARRANGED BY 
Staff b pee of Big Publisher. 
Prices reasonable 
ARNOLD T. LAX, 417 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 


MUSIC ARRANGED FOR SONGS 


Let me arrange music for your eon TI arrange mus 
gio for hit writers. Write for Darticul HOWARD 
SIMON, 22 West Adams Detroit, 


ig Neen 
| | 7 a 
a ; 
nf ~~ -# i 
i eZ} | 
i ¥; : y ° 7 i ¥ LBA : 
/ SS — —_——— ee 
jt \ | . ———n _ 
ie 
fF 
i 
on} 
| fF sss _,,_ 
a Ls - 
|; i, = 3 : = = = : - Po 
Ht 
Bite : Po 
ub —— TT Bh wane, | 3 
} eT ek El pe PART MEW 
tii —_ 2 ¥ Oy Of STORE. 
Toe “, ~ f>o> 
i ; : J 
.| rm \ lax ox a ! Z y Ney SY NDP 
i ve ese (Een wes || |) || PXO7 Om DRUMMER 
| vt me onan oor vou}) Nil) [6 | 
2) DRONS TRvE iy s é a iy 
: m é| \\ ~y ‘ ‘NE . a 
Rl re Ie _____—_ 
: | * o. 
; yr | i ‘ee Sa : 
: : 5 — pe) 
’ rr 
p 
i : 4 , 
. ( : 
Ȣ Ad 
C —- Celf-Instruction Course for Advanced Pianists. Leap 
| A 7 styles of Bass, 180 Syncopated Effects, Blue Hare 
( ony, Oriental, Chime, Movie and Cafe Jazs, TricB 
< Endings Olever_ Breaks Sp» Hers, Sar G} 
, 
ee —{T> 
. ; POPPE SOOEEEEFSOFOOP OOOO OSOS>OOEOOFOS 
’ ST ES SE URE ETI 
; * } 
2 o Gi 
le a 
: Me es ne 
| — 
| : 
: A A SRT 
i 
| ee 
fet 
a ee a ee 
eee eee ee 
| 
t . 
| ‘ 
Ve 
; ‘\ 


MARCH 18, 1922 The Billboard 61 
LEN FLEMING “THE_SONG MAN” 


COMPOSING $15.00 


The name FLEMING on a manuscript is a cuaranteo of 


“Tho Song Man,”’ Wellsboro, Pa. Don’t forget the name and address, and watch for announcement ofremoval to FLEMING BUILDING about August 
FLEMING’S DIRECTORY OF MUSIC PUBLISHERS, 44 pages, 800 names and addresses. Price, 50c, postpaid. 


ARRANGING $10.00 LYRIC REVISING $3.00 
PROMPTNESS AND EFFICIENCY 
If you are a song writer and your songs need professional attention, it is to your advantage to send your work gromptly to LEN SLEMING, 


KONDAS NUMBERS GOING GOOD 


Ashtabula, ©., March 11.—“Your number, 
‘Aw ©’ Mon,’ has been most enthusiastically 
received by our dancers,’® reads part of a 
letter from Manager E. A, Mitchell of the 
Century Roof, Ottawa, Can., to the Kondas 
Musie Publishing Co., here, which is typical 
of numerous endorsements from parties thru- 
out this country and Canada. John W. 
Ramsbottom, orchestra leader of New Bedford, 
Mass., informs: ‘The Kondas number, ‘Aw 
©’ Mon’ and ‘Painting Pictures,’ kept us 
jazzing a full half-hour at a recent engagement 
and the crowd kept yelling for more.” 


“SOUTHLAND” RECORDED 


New York, March 10.—‘‘Dear Old Southland,” 
the big hit of the Jack Mills catalog, has been 
recorded by thirty-eight mechanical companies. 
Mills believes this is a record, considering the 
length of time the number has been out. The 
gong, first published about two months ago, 
already is a reigning favorite with vaudeville 
artists and orchestras, 

“Dear Old Southland’? is based on an old 
Negro spiritual, set in fox-trot tempo and with 
a coda of new material. It is commented on 
by local musicians as being a most musicianly 
song. Creamer and Layton are the writers. 


NEW WALTZ SCORES 


“My Rose Is Only You,’ the latest number 
written by George W. Beiderwelle, popular 
musie composer, was introduced to the public 
by the Metropolitan Four at a performance 
in the Odeon, Cincinnati, March 4, for the 
benefit of the Army and Navy Union, and was 
received with tumultuous applause. Judging by 
the requests already received by its pub ishers, 
the Mid-West Publishing Company, Cincinnati, 
the success of this waltz seems assured, Or- 
chestrations are completed and several prom- 
inent phonograph companies are arranging for 
the recording of this piece. 


PROMISE FOR NEW FIRM 


Easthampton, Mass., March 10.—The New 
England Music Company, a recent addition to 
the ranks of music publishers, with head- 
quarters here, is destined for a high mark, 
according to parties in the know who have 
heard the firm’s initial releases. The num- 
bers are “Oh, Jane,”’ “Fireflies” and ‘Panama 
Rose,” and were composed by Irene Jefferies 
and 0. Jef? Malings, 


A great many of the best Dance Orchestras of the country 
are now featuring 


“JUST TELL ME WHY 
WE CAN’T AGREE” 


as a most successful Novelty Fox-trot, and , ~ 


“HAVANA 


as one of the biggest and best 
Are 


Yo 


Dance Orch. ry SROY COATS—1F prof. 


(with Sax.) 


laa on the market. 
u 


‘ 
i - 


NEW BOOK Revised and Enlarged Edition of the NEW BOOK 


mca, tmen  | "RAGTIME SAXOPHONIST. | Trax Gorse ts 
By K. E. THOMPSON. By K. E. THOMPSON. By K.E, THOMPSON. 


Price, $1.00. Price, $1.00. A complete and thorough 
A book of studies in A book of original models and ideas for | method for Saxophone, pub- 
Bass Clef to train the | “Filling-in” popular music. A book toteach | jished particularly for the 


player to read with ease “‘Ragging” and Syncopation in all forms, teacher. A graded system of 
all parts written in bass Practical for the teacher or student of Rag- | study, progressing gradually 
clef. time. Order From Your Dealer or Direct From thru every key, explaining all 


A necessity for all the technical points of Saxo- 
players desiring to do FRANK » HART phone playing and presenting 


eny branch of orchestra | | OUTHERN CALIFORNIA @ definite system of fingering 
work. so contains ex- , to simplify technical difficul- 
ercises suitable for duet ¥y Music COMPANY” ties. A book of unlimited value 
practice. 332-334 SOUTH BROADWAY. LOS ANGELES. | to both teacher and student. 


BARTLETT CO. INCORPORATED 
Detroit, March 9.—The Bartlett Music Com- 


GOING BIG EVERYWHERE!!!! 
Sess pany has been incorporated under the Michi- 


gan laws with an authorized paid-in capital 
SING IT NOW of $10,000. Bartlett Holmes is president and 
treasurer, Michael Abram, vice-president, and 


55 Theodore H. Pischke, secretary. The offices 
are at 234 State street, this city. New re- 

leases of this company indlude: ‘Day by 

‘ Day,” “Finky, the Cave Man,’ “Baby Blue 

Eyes” and “California Rose.”* Other Bart- 


lett numbers which have enjoyed a big sale 


The Sensational Waltz Ballad are “Charms,” “Orchards.” “Day by Day,’ 


“Carolina Nights’ and ‘“‘Down in Picardy.” 
PHIL PONCE PUBLICATIONS 


+—ALSO—— 
6639 OX- 
TROT Chicago, March 10.—Word has been ree 
ceived here of the organization of a new mu- 


sic publishing house, the Phil Ponce Pub- 
Send for Prof. and Orchs. Dance Orchs., 25c. | iications, with ofices at 145 West Forty-fifth 


street, New York. Mr. Ponce is well known 


THE REFOUSSE MUSIC PUB. co. here and in music channels generally and his 


continued success in selecting and eae —— 
est 45¢ reet speaks well for the new firm. The t 
145 W h St 177 orth State Street tished numbers, to be ready shortly, are 


i “Southern Moonlight,’’ a catch dance tune, and 
New York City vhicago, it. “Marry "Em Young, Treat ‘Em Rough, Tell 


’Em Nothing,” @ comedy song. 


Singers and Orchestra Leaders, Attention ! 


Three Real “Hits”? known all over the Country 
as the most up-to-date ‘“‘Numbers.” 


“DREAM MAN” 


Fox Trot Ballad 


“LOVE ROSE” 


Fox Trot Song 


“TEARS OF OUR LAST GOOD-BYE” 
Waltz Ballad 


Professional material FREE to all recognized performers. 


TOWN” 


25c. 


| ~ BERARDI-COCCIA MUSIC PUBLISHING COMPANY 
! 92 Grape Street ROCHESTER, N. Y. 


“SWEETIE PLEASE TELL ME” 


THE JOLLY, JOY SONG SUCCESS 
Prof. Material Free to Prof. Artists 
Orchestrations including saxophone parts 25c each. 


McDowell Publishing Company, Providence, R.1. 


“SHE ROLLS’EM DOWN” 


FOX-TROT SONG. Professional Copies and Orchestrations. 
WARNER C. WILLIAMS & CO., care C.E. Slider, New Albany, Ind. 


~ ORCHESTRA LEADERS! HAVE YOU 


“THAT JOLLY DANCING CROWD?” 


— as 

it LEARN HOW TO PLAY CHIMES ON THE PIANO [jo om Py covey eee see Teena enake, them dance and beg for more 

Tell-nown ‘sons’; ee ee eee LE rn ae enh en oe an he Cae Boos’ contains 
ARTHUR D. LARKIN, 3 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, N. ¥. 


Song, 10c. Orchestration, 15c. 


JOHN P. KIDDON, 3865 Gilbert Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 


\ ye 


e 7 
| 
_———_sa | a 
_ h \ 
a -_ ; 3 : Lear 
E hod 7 iif 
: _ a 
| - 
es | om ‘i 
po re 
— mz 
“MOTHER AND-DAD 
= ; 
ee : 
ae | 
a ae 
ah 
= | 
eS SS 
t 
at 
| 
4 
if, 
Hy 
ACY —in cis Theatre Bld re Bida__} rr | 
ANS, MACOPE . | 
ee | 
| 
nd us 
3 : Ho 
ey t 
; i \ 
ft ta 


Deccan Nore. 


a 


DS Maes OF oe 8 2 


REEL Pre, 


yee 


ALE or 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


" Conducted by O.APETERSON 


Billy Rabbie, bandmaster, is new located in 
Birmingham, Ala. 


Geer’s New Harmony Orchestra ie an addi- 
tion to the musical field of Fort Dodge, Ia. 


B. ©. Stokes, continuing with the Keplan 
Shows, expects to have a ten-piece uniformed 
band this season. 


Arthur Mainelli, drummer, and George 
Starch, cornetist, will again be with Cole 
Bros.’ shows this season. 


Bill Swihart says trapping was a failure 
with him this season on account of running 
into so many moonshiners. 


©. B. Duble writes that this department has 
been misinformed about his playing trombone 
at Keith Theater in Lovisville, Ky. 


Arthur Pryor and his Band, offering twice- 
daily concerts in Miami, Fla., find “Angel 
Child’”’ a most pleasing fox-trot number. 


Jack BE. Slick is playing trombone in a fast 
Gance orchestra out of Wichita, Kan., and says 
he will not be with the white tops this trip. 


Johnny Harvey, of the Dixie Mel-O-Dee Boys, 
opines: “Just about the time delirium tremens 
are declared unconstitutional, along comes 
jazz.” 


Vv. T. Medcalf, of Etowah, Tenn., has or- 
@anized an orchestra of eight seasoned musi- 
cians for hotel and summer resort engage- 
ments. 


Pauline Beil’s Lady Band is now at the 
Steacy-Trent, Trenton, N. J., following a ten- 
Week engagement at the Ten Eyck Hotel, Al- 
bany, N. Y. 


Five troupers, ©. E. Pruett, plano; Burrell 
Hobert, clarinet and sax.; Dick Coleman, ban- 
Jo, saxophone and singer; Tom Stafford, trom- 
bone, and Arnold Weitzel, drums, xylophone 
and manager, are dealing out syncopation at 


So eee een Neneh natant 


JACK MILLS, Inc. 


MUSIC PUBLISHERS 
— 152 West 45th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 


* . 


_ SUGGESTS 


“DEAR OLD 
-SWVTHLAND 


Ca a 
dlianitantanyaatanunsgnamengmdtertuansimenienioneninionenind 


ANY MATERIAL 
"YOU. MAY DESIRE 
TWILL BE SENT 

ON REQUEST. 


ra eS 2 


iucsoccessnagvesneqsorsnegonannonnunonz 


THAPUREUUUUAODUORURUEDUERERTTUOGEE 


Attention! Baritone and Tenor 
Ballad Singers only. Send for FREE copy 


of this beautiful patriotic song. 


“THAT'S THE KIND OF A GIRL | LOVE” 


Goes big on National Days and all occasions. 
Lyric clean, melody appealing. 


Arranged by Harry L. Alford, the beloved and popular arranger. 
RALPH J. FRANKLIN, SongPublisher 


MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA 


HERE YOU ARE! JUST OUT 


‘**~DREAMING’? 


The latest Waltz Song of the Season 
“It Reaches the Tender Strings of Every Heart” 
Hear It Played At Your Dealers 


Published by CHRISTOPHER MUSIC CO. 
4 West Main St., DU QUOIN ILLINOIS 
Piano and Pad 30c. Orchestra with Saxophone 35c. Full Band 35c. 


nine 


BAND AND ORCHESTRA MEN 
WANTED 
To Deal With The Professional House 


We want every Leader, Teacher and Musician, either professional or amateur, that sees this ad, to 
cut it out right now and paste it in his date book for reference, 


We sell Buescher Saxophones and other Brass Instruments, Penzel Clarinets and Flutes, Ludwig 
Drums and Supplies, Liberty Xylophones and Marimbas, Kruspe Herns, fine importeds Oboes, Bas- 
goons, Alto and 4 Clarinets, Vega Banjos, ell -—- # String Instruments, including the best 
io Violins. Full line of sundries, and we do repairing for the professisn, 


WE ARE MUSICIANS. TELL US YOUR TROUBLES. CATALUUGS FREE. 


CRAWFORD-RUTAN 219 EAST TENTH ST. 


KANSAS CITY, MO. 


ALL MUSICIANS 


BEGINNERS AND ADVANCED 
who play Cornet, Trumpet, Trombone, French Horn, Alto, Clarinet 
or Saxophone and troubled with High Tones, Low Tones, Weak 
Lips, Pressure, Sluggish Tongue, Clean Staccato in fast 
passages, Poor Tone, Jazzing, Transposition and any 
other troubles, should get our 


FREE POINTERS 
Name Instrument. Beginner or Advanced. 


| VIRTUOSO SCHOOL, Buffalo, Wi. Y. 


ILLUSTRATED SLIDES ~ #359 525 
_ On Most Of The Popular Son Hits aaa 


(For . shor 
Send for list FREE : 
SLIDE CORP. | 2.09 West 48°Sr., NY.C. 


Everything in Slides and Stereopticon “Uachisnes 


time onl 


- 


XYLOPHONISTS, ATTENTION 


My new Xylophone and Marimba Catalogue is in the works, but not ready for delivery. If you will send 
im your permanent address one will be mailed you as soon as ready. 

OLD XYLCPHONES and MARIMBAS overhauled and mado like new at a emall price—ANY MAKB. 
Bats not too badly worn will be resurfaced and retuned and refinished to sound like new. Bars too 
badly worn replaced with — ones, You can just send in the bars parcel post or express and I will 
make you a price on the j 


“THE XYLOPHONE SHOP, 5s E. R. Street (Est. 1886), 28 Brook St.. Hartford, Conn, 


JUST RELEASED 


“CALIFORNIA ROSE” “BABY BLUE EYES” 


“FINKY, THE CAVE MAN” ‘‘DAY BY DAY”’ 
Professional Copies on request to Professionals. 


BARTLETT MUSIC COMPANY, INC., Publishers, 234 State Street, DETROIT, MICH. . 


the Mother Goose Hall, El Dorado, Ter., onde: 
the name of the Manhattan Dance Players, 


A late issue of The Bandman, monthly pup. 
lication of the Kansas Band Association, roe 
fects increased interest among town bands thry 
out the State, 


Hank Young, veteran bass @rummer, wil) 
again be on the Sells-Floto Oircus with Don 


Montgomery’s Band. Tommy Fallon also wil) 
return to this connection, 


Robert Dalziel, who played onder Car! Cigir 
on the Barnum & Bailey Circus and with other 
circuses, is located in Columbia, Mo., playing 
trombone in a theater orchestra, 


Giorgio Passilia and his famous orchestra 
are under contract to the Ambassador hotels 
of New York and Atlantic City. This ag: 
gregation is of the symphonic type. 


H. H, Graham communicates: “My sixty-piece 
band will open the season in Tulsa, Ok., the 
latter part of March, James A. Thompson, 
‘golden-voiced soprano,’ will again be featured." 


Clark’s Ragadowns report a good dance sea- 
eon in and around Ea Crosse, Wis. Ear! Clark 
is banjoist; Carl Chitwood, clarinet; Rus 
Wartinbee, trombone, and Wallie Kundson, 
druias. 


Theater orchestras thruout the country last 
week observed the twenty-fifth anniversary of 
“Stars and Stripes Forever” by underlining this 
famous. march composition of John Philip Sousa 
in thelr programs. 


__ 

Harold Stern, a leading violin player of New 
York, will instal] his orchestra at Blossom Heath 
Inn, that city, this week for the remainder of 
the dance season, and will appear again this 
summer at Brighton Beach, 


Carle LaFell and His Orchestra are on the 
road again playing vaudeville dates at first- 
class motion picture theaters and dances. In 
@ recent engagement at the Palace Theater, 
Dallas, Tex., these players proved real show 
stoppers, 

R. G. Willaman, assistant director of Kari 
L. King’s Band, has been engaged as instructor 
in the School of Fine Arts, Highland Park 
College, Des Moines, Ia., for the spring se 
mester. He will again be with King during 
the summer as clarinet soloist, 

The Jazz Bimbos hare been organized in 
Kansas City, Mo., by Danny Cairns and, he 
informs, are booked to September 1. The 
lineup: “Shep” Schoenheit, sax. and piccolo; 
Cicero Conway, sax. and banjo; H. P. John- 
eon, piano; ‘Kiddo’? Rendino, violin; *Jazbo” 
Martling, cornet, with Cairns at the drums. 


Chapin’s Original Illinois Five has first call 
on choice dance dates and special engage- 
ments in and around Monmouth, Il. W. 
Schimpf is trombonist; Hap Hillinger, cornet; 
H. Numbers, drums; Geo, Chapin, piano, end 
F. Meyers, saxophone. 

Harry Askin, while in Cincinnati recently 
paving the way for the coming of Sousa’s Band, 
announced that from $4,100 to $5,000 is too 
much to pay for railroad transportation each 
week, and that the famous march king's organi- 
zation will tour the country by auto trucks. 


Wallace Blacker shoots in that he is pianist 
with the Original Melody Boys, engaged at 
Hall’s Academy, Pittsburg, Kan., until May 15, 
when play will be started at a summer resort 
in the Ozarks. Edwin Cumisky is violinist; 
Archie Moore, saxophonist, and Bobby Chalot, 
drums, 


Nearly every owner of a musical instrument 
knows what it is to be annoyed by some nervy 
borrower, but about the best story in this con- 
nection 4s of the woman who won a player 
roll a8 & card party prize and then tried to 
borrow her neighbor's automatic piano on which 
to play it 


Robert I, Johnson, clarinet and saxophone, 
and Ingersol ‘Jingle’? Carsey, trombone, re 
cently closed with Lasses White’s Minstrels and 
are now with Moore's All Star Entertainers, 22 
organization making quite a hit thru Northera 
Arkansas. Tommy Warner is pianist; Hovey 1. 
Houghton, saxophone, and ©. L, Moore, drums. 


Tn @ combination of experienced troupes 
can help an attraction to good business thru 

@ supposedly bad season is being demonstrated 
on the Holmes Lyceum show, now in its four 
teenth week thru the Northwest. An eleven- 
piece band fs directed by Gene Mitchell and 
Estella Lemoind heads the nine-piece orches- 
tra, Mr, Mitchell plays coract; Marcus 100s, 
BANJOS sists 
MANDOLIN BANK 


TENOR BANJOS, CELLO BANJOS, ETE. 


wate VEGA $0. 


— | —_ = © wm 


oe 
, 62 ee —— 
' A ee ee 
i LLL LLL 
| MINI AIL VIR a 
; y 
|B IMUSICAEMUSINGS) = 
i a 
a ee 
Te 
| 
Ww 
| | - eS eS ae 
| 7 ee 
‘i a 
‘i — —_ 
mie m; 
, 9 LS see nm 
Ry , 
- ae 
: 
| a ee 
é SETEREEEOGRS SRRRENASTE EE 
be 
: = 
“ ba 
RY tor 
bod Lo 
j — int 
he dr 
ia . - Hi 
| & anne eerrer rere eee eS be 
; Ot . fr 
- Te 
: a 
fo 
F G 
a er 
t 
fee Ww 
| * re 
: —— tl 
ti M 
, j v 
G 
x 
£ 
, . — is 
SS 8 
= E 
t 
; b 
ag S rT 
———————— 
| 
. 
i 7 
; ! 
| | PO 
, ‘ 
| : ee pe 
| ‘ 
Ve 
= SS SG — — 2 i 


The Billboard 


NOTICE MUSICIANS! 


HERE IT IS! 


NOTICE MUSICIANS! 


Ed Chenette’s Latest and Greatest Creation: 


“THE BILLBOARD'S BAZAR” 


Triumphal March. 


The greatest grand entry, triumphal march ever written. 


NOTICE MUSICIANS! 


HERE IT IS! 


Starting with a trumpeting fanfare it sounds 


the very spirit of the show world thruout its dramatic motives, ending with a grandioso, imposing, 


powerful and majestic. 
in Tell, 


bass; Bessie Cleveland, alto; Mat Loos, bari- 
tone sax.; Mrs. Loos, alto sax.; Marguerite 
Loos, tenor sax.; Edward Loos, alto sax.; Paul- 
fine Loos, soprano sax.; Robert Gifford, bass 
drum; Jack Holmes, bells and snare drum; 
Herschej A. Seall, trombone. 


The Croatian Tamburitza Orchestra, num- 
bering six members, came jn for a lot of praise 
from the press of Galveston, Tex., during a 
recent engagement there. The tamburitza is 
a long-necked instrument with six strings, 
four of which are tuned D and the last two 
G, and produces a sweet sound somewhat differ- 
ent from that of a guitar or mandolin. 


Champ Emerson, drummer and manager of 
the Dixie Melody Boys, states that a fifteen 
weeks’ engagement at the Hote] Warner, War- 
ren, 0., 
the aggregation will go on a dance tour. Ray 
Moore is pianist and director; Jack Hoffman, 
Violinist; Johnnie Ackerman, 6ax.; Hershel 
Graven, trumpet, and Herbie Smith, banjoist. 


Hartigan Bros.’ Famous Orchestra, meeting 
with success thru Pennsylvania and West Vir- 
finia, is moving westward. Emery Howard 
is planist; Charles Dy-en, banjo; Charles John- 
son, traps; ‘‘Dink’® Wilson, entertainer; John 
Hawkins, violin and cornet; Thornton Brown, 
trumpet, and Donald Redman, saxophone, trom- 
bone and clarinet. A composition by Brown is 
reported to be going over with a bang. 


Al Davis’ Orchestra is attracting enormous 
crowds at the new Palace Grand, Tulsa, Ok., 
One of the finest dansants in the Southwest, 
The roster: Raymond Maher, piano; Jack Davis, 
cornet; Frank Sherwood, trombone; ‘‘Boozie’’ 
Weathers, drums, and Dewey Al Davis, clarinet, 
saxophone and piano, After April 23 the com- 


bination is expected to appear at @ resort in 
California, 


—aeeel 

Giers’ Musical Ten, now playing the Poli 
Cireuit, are delivering a real line of modern 
Syneopation and meeting with great success. 
' esley Glers, banjo soloist, assisted by 
‘Smiling’ Jack Roop, eccentric drummer, is 
featured. The other players are Misses Myrtle 
and Rae Giers, violins; Miss Lotus Champione, 
Piano; Miss Elvira Roop, trombone; Miss Nan 
Keller and Miss Letty Giers, melophones; 
‘Speed’ Keller, cornet; Harry Warren, clar- 
inet, and Paul Giers, bass drum. 


Who remembers when— 

Sam Rickey missed the boat while touring 
with the Reynolds Cirens in 1869? Gabe Boone, 
Second fiddler from Kentucky," was in the 


With a full band it sounds like a million dollars. 
OTHER MARCH LIKE IT! 


BAND when you go down the street playing THE BILLBOARD'S BAZAR! 
with 5 saxophone parts. 


RECORDING COMPANIES! 


ended March 1 and for several weeks . 


It is not hard! 


The natives will sit up and take notice. They will 


Price 40 


MECHANICAL PRODUCERS! You will want this, 


GES THE GREAT SONG HIT 


MUSCLE SHOALS BLUES 


THE SEASON’S BEST FOX TROT—SONG. 


Already out onw@e Q. R. S., U. S., Kimball and other leading player word 
rolis, and the Wurlitzer and Clark rolls for electric pianos. Are now re- 
leased by several large phonograph record companies. 


Sheet Music, 35c. Orchestrations, 35c. 
Order from your jobber or direct from the publishers. 


GEORGE W. THOMAS MUSIC COMPANY 


482 Bowen Avenue, CHICAGO 


??HAVE YOU A DANCE ORCHESTRA?? 


Send Your Name and Address on a Postal Card. You'll Be Placed PERMA- 
NENTLY on Our Mailing List and Receive Orchestrations for Dancing 


FREE—— 


You'll Be Surprised. You'll Be Pleased. 
TOM LYNN STUDIOS, 425 S. Clinton St., Syracuse, N. Y. 


HIT THE BALL 


Base Ball Fans send for this one. Piano 10c, Orchestra 15c 
JOHN STORM, R. D. 2, WHEELING, W. VA. 


“4 of anything in Music by any process. 
§) Estimates gladly furnished. 43 years experience 


inmusic printing. Largest plant west of New York. 


MONEY WRITING SONGS 


A successful music composer and publisher writes a book explaining how te make money publishing songs. 
Contents: Correcting Your Faults, Writing a Melody, Directing the Ambitious Young Composer, Placing Your 
Songs Before the Public. Lists over 500 Music Dealere—200 Band and Orchestra Dealers. You need this 
book, Only one of its kind on the market. Only $1.00, postpaid. Money back if you say so. Send for circular. 


UNION MUSIC CO., Cincinnati, Ohio. | 


With eight mouthpieces it has the volume of the Storm Scene 
IT 1S NEW IN STYLE! 


THERE IS NO 
know you've got SOME 
cents net for full band 


Order today direct from THE CHENETTE PUBLISHING CO., EVELETH, MINN. 


Send for a copy. 


booby hatch jn Missouri? Chas, Wetterman, 
still trouping, got the name of “Chas. Last’® 
in 18906? Daniel Davis lost his false teeth on 
Spellman’s Indoor Circus of Pittsburg? The 
big wind storm encountered by the Hagenbeck- 
Wallace show at Pocatello, Idaho? Chas. Wet- 
terman got stuck in the mud in New Orleans 
and swore it was his last season? Jimmy 
Ward got the name of “String Beans?” Dick 
Masters, on the John Robinson Circus in 1917, 
had Wilfred Simpson, Chas. Duble, Roy Bas 
sett, ‘‘Rusty’’ Campbell, Arthur Cox and the 
“famous sud throwers’’ in the band? 


The non-pressure system of playing a cornet 
has been im vogue for many years. In these 
days nearly all beginners are taught the right 
Way, but some of us older ones were not so 
fortunate. We started with the old pressure 
system and find it very difficult to change. 

There js no such thing as ‘‘loose lip’’ sys- 
tem. The lips must become rigid in order to 
get the higher tones. We of the old school 
used to press the mouthpiece to our lips in 
order to make them rigid. The proper way 
is to make them rigid by muscular contrac- 
tion. 

Many years ago we were told to stretch our 
lips in the form of a smile before placing the 
mouthpiece. This also was a fallacious bit of 
flapdoodle. One cannot make a sphincter mus- 
cle rigid by stretching it. Only by contrac- 
tion can asy muscle be made rigid. Another 
common error exploded. 

Place your lips naturally on the mouthpiece 
without contortion or attempt at stretching. 
As you go up for higher tones make them rigid 
by contraction, in the form of a kiss. The 
old idea of lip stretching is erroneous and ob- 
solete. Let them vibrate freely for the lower 
and middle register. Make them more rigid 
by contraction as you go up for the higher 
tones. Do not try to stretch them by smi- 
ling. Hold them natural while placing the 
mouthpiece, 


The modern Boehm flute is the most perfect 
of all keyed instruments, and in the hands of 
an artist can be played in perfect tune. The 
fact that they are not always played in tune 
does not weaken this assertion. Neither is a 
violin always played in tune. 

The Boehm flute is so facile and its intonation 
&0 easily controlled that there is no good rea- 
son why it should not be played in perfect 
tune—if the player has a good ear. By merely 
turning his blow-hole out or in he can easily 
raise or lower the pitch of any tone, if nee 
essary. It is a much neglected instrument. 
There should be more in use. 


manos 18, 1802 | Pi Lisi 
i | 
ee iat 
i HF 
t 
es | | 
__ 
; 
” ‘ 
ees | oe 
A, eee | | 
ee Ha 
CC (ttsC(‘(‘(‘(CSW 
ee ee 
: ee 
ee 
ae ——— ‘a 
ee Ht 7 
MUSIC PRINTERS “ENGRAVERS | 
es | 
rt) 
Estero + Ske OTTO ZIMMERMAN SON onset i 
==— eee Lan 


—__ 


~ = 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1929 


TARY THE PROFES 
y y 


SION MAY 


A 


OP IZIN 


w 


TEOR OFTTIMES VI 


Editor The Billboard—May I add a word in 
Tegard to your Patterson James, whose ‘Off 
the Record’ and criticisms I read with keen 
interest. I admi-e his criticisms because they 
seem to be fair to all and he does not, as 
some critics, sugar-coat his criticisms of the 
stars, even as we mediocre artists, would be- 
Significant member of the cast. 1 believe if it 
were not for some honest criticism that these 
stars, even as we mediocre artists, would be 
come careless. But honest criticism keeps them 
Pegging on. All broad-minded people like to 
know their faults so they can correct them 
as quickly as possible. Let us have more like 
Patterson James. 

(Signed) CLAIRDB ILLINGTON (ZALESKI). 

Caldwell, O. 
Editor The Billboard: 

I have been reading The Billboard for years, 
and, being interested in songwriting, always 
admired the Melody Mart section. A few years 
ago a fellow could observe news notes from 
writers all over the country, which was a splen- 
did idea, and kept one informed on the doings 
of writers as a whole, but now I am wondering 
what is wrong with E. M. Wickes. 

For some months past I find only dope from 
Tin Pan Alley publishers and writers. Is that 
giving the rest of the writers a chance? 

If a writer out of the Metropolis sends in any 
items, they will be found under the caption of 
“Bass Notes.’ I have never sent any notes to 
Mr. Wickes, but know a few chaps who have 
and their mention always lands in ‘“‘Bass Notes.” 

I hope Mr. Wickes will act more impartial io 
his write-ups. 

(Signed) JOHN W. DELROE. 
Coco Solo, Canal Zoae, Panama, 
Feb. 26, 1922. 
Editor The Billboard: 

I notice that your valued paper has seen 
fit to give considerable space to articles con- 
cerning the cabarets of Panama. 

The article jn the February 4 issue, re- 
ferring to girls sitting at tables with uni- 
formed men, is true, I will admit, to a certain 
extent, but why any acknowledged cabaret 
performer or entertainer should balk at the 
prospect, I cannot see, and the remark made 
by a young lady: “After singing we were 
told to sit at tables with soldiers and sail- 
ors, then we balked,”’ can be taken in many 
a different way. 1 take it as an insult to our 
Gag. 

A brief time ago a man in the uniform ot 
Uncle Sam was welcome in every American 
home, from the humblest to the richest. Wher- 
ever he appeared in public, respect and honor 
was shown him. Any girl was proud to be 
seen in his company. It is the uniform that 
represents the defense of our flag, and should 
be held in high honor, and a person showing 
disrespect to the uniform should be treated 
in the same manner as one who insults the 
fag. Today the war is over and those who 
still wear the uniform are not only shunned, 
but discriminated against. 

If there is not enough patriotism among our 
citizens to respect the uniform, where wil 
we find it? It is my belief that a law should 
be enacted to couple a difference and courtesy 
to our men in uniform—but probably this 
young woman who disrespects the uniform does 
not know that she also insults our flag, and 
that they who do are un-American and un- 
patriotic and should be dealt with accordingly. 
The men who wear the uniform of Uncle Sam 
are picked from the cream of our nation, and 
owe it to their country and their oath of 
allegiance to shun those who disrespect it. 

Let us unite now as we did in time of war 
and give respect to our flag, and to the man 
who wears the uniform of our grand United 
States. Let us not permit anybody to in- 
sult or defame it. 

I am also thoroly acquainted with the con- 
ditions as they exist in the cabarets down 
here, and while I must admit that they may 
not appear to a stranger to be as modern as 
those in the States, there can be no question 
as to their respectability, and allowing for the 
customs of this country as they are at pres- 
ent, their morals are beyond question. I gsin- 
cerely hope that the readers of The Billboard 
will judge the entertainers here impartially 
and with candor as to the rating given them 
in the past few months. 

After a careful and impartial investigation 
I have decided that it is a rank injustice to 
allow such an article to be passed over with- 
out comment. 

Trusting this article will find space in 
your valuable paper, I am. 

(Signed) BD. L. THOMAS. 


119 Central Avenue, care Ryley, 

Newark, N. J. 
E4itor The Billboard—I have been a reader 

of your intezesting paper weekly for the past 


three years, and knowing the valuable assist 


a, 


WS ARE Livest NEWS” 


TH ) 


ance you bave given the Actors’ Equity Asso- 
ciation and the fair manner in which you 
have always dealt with our difficult problems, 
I may say that The Billboard has had no 
more persistent champion than myself. I have 
sometimes taken friendly exception to articles 
in The Billboard, but, in view of the over- 
wheiming proof of your goodwill to the actor, 


my exceptions have invariably been subor- 
dinated and the benefit of the doubt allowed 
to remain with The Billboard. 


But the subject of this letter is one which 
neither I nor those of my race can subordinate 
to anything in the slightest degree, 

My personal feelings towards The Billboard 
are of the friendliest, because I am loath to 
believe that an up-to-date journal such as The 
Billboard, or its Editor, wou'd knowingly en- 
dorse the anti-Semitic utterances of ‘‘Patter- 
son James’? (everyone knows this to be the 
nom-de-coward of James Wm. FitzPatrick, 
who led the White Rats to ruin) which have 
appeared in not only The Billboard, but also 
in that despicable paper, ‘‘The Dearborn (In)- 


dependent,’’ which seeks to place ALL He- 
brews in the category of undesirables. That 
abortion of the press deserves no mention, but 
that The Billboard should apparently act in 


co-operation with it is of serious moment to 
all Hebrews in the show business. 

It is also a serious matter for The Billboard, 
as already there is talk of boycotting the 
paper unless Patterson James is properly dealt 


with, That this is no faise alarm you can 
ascertain by referring to the Jewish daily 
paper, ‘‘Forward,"’ dated Friday, January 27, 
in which The Billboard is referred to as “an 
anti-Semitic publication,’ and particular at- 
tention is paid to Patterson James and his 
connection with the ‘Dearborn § sheet.”’ 

I am now eng.ced on the American stage, 


but was formerly a favorite in the Yiddish 
theater, therefore I am in a position to know 


how the Hebrews in both American and Jew- 
ish theaters feel on this subject. No matter 
what efforts you may make to remove the bad 
impression and no matter what denials or ex- 
planations are made by FitzPatrick (1 don’t 
know the man) or anyone Hlebrews in 
show business. or out of it will not be con- 
vinced that The Billboard does not endorse his 
attack on the “Jews” if ‘‘Patterson James” 
continues these writings. In view of your 
good work for our organization we (there are 
several of us interested in this communication) 
feel that you are entitled to this suggestion, 


else, 


that you deny sympathy with the destructive 
and un-Christien doctrines of ‘‘Patterson 
James.”’ 


If The Billboard DOES endorse this anti- 
Semite (which we do not for a moment believe, 
or we would not thas address you) there is 
nothing more to be said, but in the belief 
tuat such is not the case. I beg to remain, 

Yours s‘ncerely, 
(Signed) MAURICE RUBIN, 
Member Lambs’ Club and A. B. A. 

(The Billboard is always glad to print the 
honest expression of its readers and to publish 
their fair and unbiased criticisms of its con- 
tributors, But we insist that our voluntary 
critics should confine themselves to facts and 
that the critics and the criticisms in them- 
selves should be bona fide and above board. 


In the above letter the reference to James 
William FitzPatrick is untrue. The reference 
to The Dearborn Independent and Patterson 
James and The Billboard is equally untrue, 
The matter which appeared in The Dearborn 
Independent was “‘lifted’’ from the columns 
of The Billboard and was published without 
either the knowledge or consent or permission 
of Mr. James or The Billboard.—Editors The 
Billboard.) 


Athens, Ga., March 6, 2922. 

Editor The Rillboard—I have been a _ con- 
stant reader of The Billboard for many years 
and wish to say you are doing a great work in 
the interests of the profession. Keep it up. 

I have always admired the stand of The 
Billboard in fighting for cleanliness in the 
show world. It sadly needs cleaning. 

Thanks for Patterson James. We need mme 


HERE THEY ARE 


A FEAST FOR YOU 


THE SUN ALWAYS SHINES 


Featured by Harry D. Orr’s “Million Dollar Dolls’’ 


AROUND YOU (Waltz) 


DOWN THE NILE (To Old Cairo) A Fascinating Oriental Fox Trot 


| WONDER WHY YOU HANG AROUND (Novelty) 


Featured by Walter Marion, the Boy With Four Voices 


Prof. Copies Free to 
Recognized Performers 


THE MILLER MUSIC PUB. CO. 


124 South Loomis St. 


CHICAGO, ILL. 


. JUST RELEASED. Beautiful Waltz Ballad 


““‘T WANT YOU 


BACK AGAIN”’ 


Featured by several headliners, including the FRENCH ARMSTRONG 
TRIO, and THE WARWIGK MALE QUARTETTE, of Lyceum and 


Chautauqua fame. 
‘all recognized singers. 


Professional copies and orch., now ready. Free*to 
Dance orchestrations, 25c. 
COMINGORE & BEAMER, 125 North Main Street, - 


- Laura, I. 


MAMMY’S LOVING LULLABY 
Big Waltz Hit. 
BROWN EYES 
Fox-Tret Hit. 
Double Orchestration, both numbers for or- 


chestra, 25c, or sent FREE if our 
ORCHESTRA CLUB. — 


JOIN OUR ORCHESTRA CLUB 


Just a little different than others, ‘You will not 
cmly receive our popular song hits. but all instru- 
mental numbers we publish during the year. The 
dance orchestrations will be arranged for 11 parts, 
Piano, horms and saxophones. Enclose $2.00 for a 
year’s subscription today. 


FISHER THOMPSON MUSIC PUB. CO., 


- Gaiety Theatre Building, NEW YORK 


Ingersoll Was the Most Talked of Man in the World 
“REMEMBER THE GIRL IN YOUR OLD HOME TOWN” 


IS THE MOST TALKED OF SONG 


DANCE 


Inside on Dan and Music.* 0; le at 
ae aA, + . cing D ae all 


DANCE REVIEW PUBL. CO., 1400 
MOST POPULAR MAGAZINE OF ITS KIND, - 


REVIEW 


prominent news stands and subways. $2.50 


roadway, New Sear 


SAXOPHONIST, WOOD-WINDS, ATTENTION! 


End all your pad troubles by waterproofing them with “PAD-POWDER.” 


Pads treated thus will stay absolutely dry, soft and clean like new. 


to apply. Price, 25c. 


Simple 


NORME D. FROST, Box 156, Topeka, Kansas. 


[MUSIC ARRANGED “™ 


lead sheet, for voice and piano. Moderate 
Up-to-date orchestrations 


prices. 
BY AN EXPERT theo.c. seach, rooms0s, 1433 Broadway,W.Y.C. 


BUREKA! Our author wrote songs thirty years and published NONE. Think what 
our first issue, 


you escaped and try 


“A Body Can’t Help But Loving You’”’ 


MELODY MARKET, NILES, MICHIGAN, 


RAG.-JAZZ 


PIANO or SAXOPHONE 


TAUGHT IN 20 LES 
Christensen Schools in most citi “¢nay- 


—or write for book! mai] 
wanted in unoccupied = course, Teachers 


CHRISTENSEN SCHOOL OF POPULAR MUSIC 


Suite 5, 20 E. jackson CHICAGO 


ARICI A 8 ss 
MUSIC ARRANGED BY SPECIALIST 


for Piano, Orchestra and Band. § 
for prices and Samples of ee 


HERMAN A. HUMMEL, 
250 Colonial Arcade, Cleveland, Ohio, 
DON’T FAIL TO GET YouR c 
tiful of folke’ song, “AS THE DEW ret be Ps 
C.J. SNEBOLD. 9 “Geese accent samp "a 
Pennsylvania, ouen, Natrona, 


— 


SONGW 
We do all kinds of WRITERS 


ing. Wonderfu) 
Satisfaction 
Seite Ting enteed. MACKS? SONG SHOP, "Pak 


SONG WRITERS _ 


let me arrange your M 
RAY HIBBELER, — B-4040 Dickens Ave,, Chicage, 


like him. J have greatly enjo: 
ai sad to say they are hing ro oa 

nm your issue of February 25 
varying emotions of wrath and — +g 
Bernstein's letter which appeared ig * 
Letters." He takes the stand that “you are 
killing the goose that laid the Bolden egg b 
fighting for cleanliness,’’ and tells you, ““Hande 
of.’ This man goes on to Say that we Ameri- 
cans are uncultured and that our only diver. 
sion is sex and sex display. 

Where are we drifting to? Yes, there is 
agony in the show world, but who brouzht it? 
My answer is the class thievs 

composed of thieves, 
harlots, short change artists, would-be yer. 
formers and grafters—the leeches and parasites 
of the show world. 

And still this man has the nerve to tell 
that, as real Am coh. 

ericans, we have no refinement 
or culture, 

Indoor or outdoor show business has the same 
problem to face. We must either clean up or 
face the music. The people (public) more and 
more are demanding clean moral shows. They 
are sick and tired of taking their wives and 
children, their mothers anq sisters and sweet- 
hearts to a show and listening to a ‘‘would-be” 
or several *‘would-bees’’ pull a lot of filthy jokes 
on sex relations. It is disgusting and nauseat- 
ing and fills one with a violent desire to mur 
der the poor saps who call themselves artists 
and actors. “Clean up" should be the motto. 
Send the undesirables back to where they came 
from. They do not belong in the profession 
with honest, hard-working and God-fearing men 
and women who struggle under a heavy load 
of their own, without having to bear the sneers 
and slurs that the bad type °f people bring 
on them. 

People go to theaters to see real actors and 
actresses put on real plays. They pay their 
money to see the real thing and they expect 
the actors to be genuine. Why not? Men 
in civil life have to be expert in their line 
to be a success. They work hard for theit 
money and object to paying to witness a show 
put on by people who are not actors and a> 
tists enough to get over without the smut 
and sex display. 

We have real actors and artists on the 
American stage, plenty of them, and I’ve o¢ 
ticed that they never have to disguise thelr 
work to make it go over. Why? They're 
genuine and the audience knows it. 

I've been in the profession since 1880 ané 
certainly know what I’m talking about. 

Bernstein further advises to leave all the 
“hypocrisy” to the ministers and reformers. 
Yes, tho truth does hurt, murder will out. 
Long live the reformers. Real show people 
will aid them in their work. It is pretty bad 
when people outside of the show world have 
to step in and clean it up. 

I have two boys. Both are troupers and 
have been for a number of years. Recently 
my oldest boy joined the church and is now {o 
a Bible college preparing for the ministry. 
I suppose Mr. Bernstein would say he is § 
traitor to the show business. Maybe 80. Is 
a bartender or bootlegger a traitor when be 
gives up the game on account of being cod 
vinced that the work is not all right? Is & 
prostitute a traitoress when she accepts Christ 
and tries to lead a decent life? Liquor cac’t 
be abused too much. Lewd women are not 
supposed to mix with decent people. But 
show business can be abused, has been abused 
and is being abused by the element I have 
mentioned before. 

I’m proud to announce that a son of mine 
is going to be a “hypocrite minister, and 1 
hope that I will lve to see him take bis 
place in the ranks of the reformers of this 
country and do his part toward cleaning OD 
the moral filth of this country. 

(Signed) J. FRANOIS JOHNSON. 


atmosphere are 


Hotels with the professional ‘te thle 


what yu want. The Hotel Directory 
issue may serve you. 


t a | 
| ————————_ 
i 
|! —— 
‘| ! 
| 
A cc ic 
i n 
. Le 
Hat 
i SS 
| eet 
SR 
; a 
¥ — [Te 
po Po TC s~—SCSY 
| 
| a 
a ee 
’ 1 —_—_— es 

: 4 EEE 

oe - ee 
tg numa aaa 

4 i ee 

— 

* eee 
| ge 
| a _ eee —— 

| 1 FY] 

A 
| } | 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


65 


(COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR NEW YORK OFFICES) 


Manner meek, red rosy cheek— 

Subway train. 

locks and summer sox— 

Golden grain. 

Glance or two, smile she threw— 
Heart beats fast. 

Eyes of brown, a coaxing frown— 
Dream of past. 

Smiles again and then again— 
A tiny hand, 

Youth in bloom and sweet perfume— 
Nature's grand. 

Some candy give and as I live— 
I'm getting bold. 
Winning Miss, a kiss and this— 

She’s four .years old. 


Curly 


It requires a bunch of fighting to get hold 
of one of those peace dollars. 


Lew Watts, of the Watts Bros., says one- 
ha'f of the crazy folks are in the asylums, and 
his brother, Joe, says the other half are in 
show business, 


Al Cotton says it is so cold in Canada that 
actors insist on getting blanket contracts. He 
also says landlords of apartment houses will 
not be admitted to heaven because the chil- 
dren might annoy them. 


Fable. Once there was a vaudeville actor 
who claimed he was the worst in the business, 


Act that has been waiting nine years for 
a “‘tryout’’ is going to give up vaudeville, 

Sam Bernard says he will tackle ‘‘Hamlet”’ 
if they will permit him to use a Dutch dialect. 


Harry Walton, formerly of the team of Mc- 
Bride and Walton (boxers), is thinking of 
taking a crack at vaudeville. 

Those babes often made the police jump up 
on the stage when they were doing their stuff 
thinking they were on the level with their 
scrap. 


Elsie Ryan has purchased a beautiful parlor 
canoe. She must have a lake in her flat. 


Don’t take long for the “double cross” to 
get in action once it starts, 


Next 
taxes. 


move will be to place a tax on 


It is considered bed taste these days to be 
a celebrity. 


Strange man met Earl Carroll on Broadway 
one cold night and said: ‘‘You look like a 
boy who should own a_ theater.”’ 

Carroll said: ‘I would like to own one. I 
have two shows, one in each of my upper 
vest pockets, and I have no place to put them.” 

The stranger went away and returned in 
twenty minutes with a waste-basket full of 
thousand dollar bil’s and handed it to Earl 


and said: “Go and build yourself a playhouse."* 
Moral. Always warm up to men with waste- 
baskets, 


Sam Howe manages to worry along on the 


Columbia Circuit every season with a show 
that grabs a bunch of kale. He does it 
some ‘‘Howe."" 


The first lesson in theatrical] management is 
to learn how to keep away from actors, 


Some artists suffer vaudeville, others endure 
it, 


De Wolf Hopper asked a conductor out West 
if the train was on a down grade. The con- 
ductor said: ‘“‘No. We are going up a slight 
incline. Why do you ask?" 

“T can't understand how that cow out there 
can beat us if we are going up hill.” 


When a fellow starts down hill it seems 
that everything is greased for the occasion. 


Mirth is natural. It is pure. It is strictly 
honest. ‘There can be no true ripple of 
laughter at another's expense. The practical 
joker is vulgar and mean souled. THis jest is 
hollow and only echoes the pain of sorrow of 
his vietim. Vast, indeed, is the difference 
between low, coarse ribaldry and the spark- 
‘ng, genuine cadences of human glee. 


What is the largest room in the world? 
The room for improvement. 


One day it occurred to the good God to give 
& party in his palace of azure. All the virtues 
were invited, but the virtues only, and, in 


consequence, there were no gentlemen among 
the guests. 


He took one of them by the hand and led 
her toward the other. ‘‘Benevolence,” said 
he, indicating the first, ‘‘Gratitude,’’ turning 
to the other. The two virtues were unutter- 
ably astonished. For since the world began 
they had never met before. Fable. 


What would the world be if we had no 
successful] men? 

Some successes are tarnished a little, but 
they are successes just the same. 


Very many virtues, both great and small. 


accepted the invitation. 
The little virtues proved to be more agree- 


“Fill Up the Grate’’ was a great historical 


able and more courteous than the great ones. Character. 
However, they all seemed thoroly happy and 
conversed pleasantly with one another as peo- Reader: The battle of Bosworth Field, 


ple who are well acquainted. 
But suddenly the good God noticed two fair 
ladies who appeared not to know each other, 


which furnishes the climax to Shakespeare's 
“Richard III,’ is in Leicestershire, England, 
about fourteen miles south of Leicester and 


| HAVE YOU OUR TWO BIG HITS? 
| 
| 
| 


“You'll Wish You Had Me Back Again’ 


Sensational Waltz Hit of 1922, just released to the National Automatic Player 
Roll Co., of Grand Rapids, Mich. 


! “IT’S IGAROLL” 


Our smashing Jazz Hit Prof. 0 and orchestrations in 12 parts, including 


saxophones, now ready. 


A JOS. F KINEALY MUSIC PUB. CO., 3146 Chouteau Ave., St. Louis, MO. 


SINGERS ATTENTION PLUGGERS 


We have a big new proposition singing our Songs in theaters in your city. BIG MONEY, 


WRITE TODAY for particulars. 
CURTIS & DECK 197 Goulding Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 


Chenette Publishing Co., Eveleth, Minn. 


Invite all song writers, amateur or professional, to gf a song by title “LUCK.” There is no entrance 
fee, and there are no prizes, but the best number will be pub'ished under regular royalty contract, providing a 
good enovgh number be found. Writers must send complete songs; that is, both words and music; and if manu- 
srTipts are to be returned sufficient postage to guarantee this must accompany the song. Winner will be 


announced later, Anyone may submit as many songs as he or she may desire, all songs to be in not later 
than April 8th, 


YOU’LL BE SUPREME AGAIN ERIN ASTHORE 


This fs IRELAND'S new song. It will make all your hearts beat joyous and gay. It will be ENCORED by 
everyone because it is for full liberty and freedom, like our own grand US, You must hear it to 
understand WHY. Released on Goode Music Rolls. One good H-I-T. 


HUSTLE RUSTLE TUSSLE MUSCLE 


That means every husky Yankee boy. And it’s the game tliat gives him great joy. It’s the best Yankee 
boy song of the day. EWery country likes the hustling Yankee boy. SONGS, 25 cents each. FREE to Pro- 
fessicnal Singers and Orch. Leaders. When you get these songs, ag 3 t. oe the song you like. Amd you n 
like the song you get. $250 cash amd a grand $150 Pho << or some spare time worker wil] get. 
Songs are in Shanghai, China, now. J. W. SP ENCER. “Box 7, Olneyvifle, Rhode Island. 


MY FAT GIRL 
BACHELOR BLUES 
| WANT A GOOD BIG HEARTED MAN 


Everyday life songs. Snappy Music. Protessienal, try our numbers, 20 cents a copy. Orchestration, 25 
cents 2 copy. Good n to agent 
ENGLEWOOD MUSIC HOUSE, 516 Englewood Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 


“THAT’S WHY THEY SAY I’M GREA 


000 Landslide 
AGENTS FOR SMALL 


PUBLISHERS AND OUTSIDE SONG WRITERS. 
HARRY HASKELL, INC., - - 2130 Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. 
Founded 1900. 


DALBY ape WERNIG 
Sulte 706 


cuic 

SERVICE 
ME 145 West 45th St., NEW YORK ory, 

oniGiy AL PIANO COPY FROM YOUR ROUGH SKETCH OF MELCDY - 

ORIGINAL TEN-PIECE VOCAL AND DANCE ORCHESTRATION, COMBINED................+0++ 


*0.00 

Positively guarantee to return within forty-eight hours of receipt of melody. Money order (mo checks) 
payable to ALFRED DALBY. 
oe 


PHOTOPLAY PIANISTS 
ATTENTION! 


WE OFFER. ~ a limited time, the following num- 
bers at 10¢ eac 


MEXICAN DANCE—CANTAR LLORANDO.” 
onan pan SERENA 


ANIS NTASIA, Wy “‘PALOMA.”* 
PORTO RICAN ago “ROSITA,” 
CHILEAN D 


ANCE MANANA.’ 
MARCH, “MOONLIGHT IN DIXIE.” 
MARCH, “ALWAY FORWARD 
HE SALEM WITCHES.” 
. “FLOWERS AND SMILES. he 
Z. “SONG OF LOVE.’ 

All the above are also published for Military Band. 
Send for Catalog*and Price List, 


JEAN M. MiSSUD, Salem, Mass. 
17 NEW MUSIC POUCHES (Band) 


Leather, cloth ommed: slings; $68.00. Deposit, bal- 
ance C. 0. D. CHARLES HART, Derby, Conn. 


about two miles from the town, Market Bos- 
worth, 


Sam Fitzpatrick is training a boxer who on 
rainy days goes out and stands in the road 
and lets the lightning strike him six or seven 
times on the chin to see if his jaw is strong. 


Some men are so small that fifty of them 
could be stuck into the little end of nothing 
and when shook up they would rattle 


“Vaudeville Taught on the Banjo” 
way a sign reads in a Bronx window, 


is the 


Reader: Nellie Maguire was a 
and was the wife of Albini, 


coster singer 
the magician. 


Clayton White owns a bulldog that has 
eight different kinds of blood in its system. 
If you don't bel eve it Clayton will take out 
some of the blood and show it to you. 


Sally Walker, of the ‘Follies,’ is not the 
little Sally Walker who was sitting in the 
sun. 


“THE BILLBOARD’S BAZAAR” 


Eveleth, Minn., March 10.—That Ed Chenette, 
head of the local music publishing company 
which bears his name, will see the goal he 
has set fer his march composition, ‘‘The Bill- 
board's Bazaar,”’ is apparent from the flow of 
orders and words of praise from recognized 
band leaders in the United States and Canada. 
For parades and concerts the march has been 
declared to be ideal. The Chenette Publish- 
ing Company also is doing business on its other 
numbers, among them being ‘“‘Swaying,”” a 
waltz; ‘“‘Love’s Day,’’ ballad; ‘‘Minnie,’’ fox- 
trot, and “‘In Sante Fe,”’ also a fox-trot, 


PUBLISHERS SEEK DAMAGES 


‘Minneapolis, March 9.—In suits filed here in 
the federal court Leo Feist, Inc., asks $250 
damages from William A. Steffes of the North- 
ern Theater for playing ‘‘Swanee River Moon,”” 
and Irving Berlin seeks a like amount from 
the New Peking Cafe for the playing of one 
of his copyrighted numbers. 


NEW DEPARTMENT ADDED 


Chicago, March 11.—Edward C. McCormick, 
head of Mack's Song Shop, writes that he bas 
added an arrangement department to his busi- 
ness at Palestine, Ill., and is now prepared to 
take care of all arranging of orchestrations. 
The firm has also established a branch office 
in Room 406, 145 North Clark street, this city, 
for the convenience of professionals visiting 
here. 


Look thru the Letter List in this issue. 


* BONES” IS THE 
Read *’em and weep; 
Play ’em and reap. 


FULL BAND 42c EACH SMALL ORCHESTRA 46c EACH 
NEW BAND MARCHES 


| ‘THE TRUMPET CORPS MARCH......E. K. Heyser 
A great Entry March. 42c 

| THE DETROITER MARCH ...........C. T. Johnson 
| New style, in 6-8. 42c 

| 
| 
| 


NECOID MARCH eee sescccesseccees dee 
Barber Shop Harmony. 42c 

SERVICE MARCH...................Harold Bennett 
One you can play all day. 42c 


FILLMORE MUSIC HOUSE - - -: - 


BONES TROMBONE 


He’s BIG DICK, or Number 10, of Henry Fillmore’s Trombone Family — MISS, TEDDY, LASSUS, PAHSON 
SALLY, SLIM, MOSE, SHOUTIN’ LIZA, HOT 
RARINIST ONE-STEP OF THE BUNCH 


New Band Arrangements of 
POET AND PEASANT OVERTURE 


AND 
LIGHT CAVALRY OVERTURE 
Modernized and Americanized by Henry Fillmore. 
Primarily built for large bands, but so thoroughly cued 
they make ideal arrangements for small bands. 
Full Band, each $2.25 


FULL ORCHESTRA 63c EACH 


CINCINNATI, OHIO 


Cs SE 


9 


oh a ea Ate tn Oe pt a 


Pe ee ~ is 
? ELMER TENLEYVS CRA cKs |b cone i 
———<—V———— ee / 
CO rrrrrrrrrrr——C—isdY —— 
ee ih 
as | 
a es | 
ee | ————— 
: I 
ee a ie : 
an -—_—_—+ _ We | 
— ee | 
se ——; L 
SS eee ee | { 
———— | 
ae ee __ 
— re | 
Po ——$<$<$—$——————————— — | i 
es Ce 
es | Un 
ee il 
ee es | | 
Of ___ | \ | | 


EE OODLE 


ins 


The 


Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


AUSTRALIA 


By MARTIN C. BRENNAN, 114 Castlereagh Street, Sydney 


Sydney, Jan. 18.—Beresford and Rennie, Eng- 
lish musical comedy artists, are among the 
newcomers at the Fuller Thestcr, They got over 
nicely. Laura Guerite is back on the same Dill 
for a brief 
Rt T! Fuller 


season, 
he firm is again advertising with 
The Sunday Times, one of the papers controlled 
by the Hon. Hugh D. Melntosh. 
siderable time there was no business doing, but 
the breach has apparently been healed, which 
should be eminently satisfactory to both parties, 
i John Fuller, Sr., father of Sir Benjamin Ful- 
; ler, returned from his English tour recently. 


For some con- 


Beg W. J.D 


He feels much benefited by the trip. 

Wilmer Bentley, who out here orige 
finally as producer for ‘“‘Irene’’? and remained 
behind in the interests of the Williamson- 
Tait fim, returned by the ‘Sonoma.” 

lallie Brooke, a well-known performer who 
settled down jnto commercial life here two 
years ago, was recently robbed of goods to 
the value of £200. The thieves have 
not been apprehended. 

Colonel Bob Love, 
Harmston’s Circus, 
list here, cele‘ rated 
week. 
faculties and 
‘ man ten 


came 


ove? 


tte i a 


ae 


eae: 


for many years manager of 
but now on the pension 
his 72nd birthday last 


Dian ciel 


is physically 
years his junior. 
minager of the Fuller vaude- 
a ville circuit, ‘is on a _ well-earned vacation, 
ie after a year of very strenuous work, 

H The carniva's are all getting in position with 
the advent of fine weather. The rain has not 
yet cleared right away, but indications are 
good, 

Tell Elsie Vonnolly (now Mrs. Ralph Rogers, 
x “Jazz Wop’’) that her son, Tommy, is okay 
and doing well with the Kellermann show in 
‘: New Zealand. He has probably written home 
% to her ere this, 
: The Howards, in their mental telepathy act, 
ir are now working the big picture theaters to 
very big success. Jim Howard is in hopes that 

his brother will make the trip from England 
this year, in which case they will put on the 
biggest mental act ever known, so says James. 

Have some dope on Horace Goldin and the 
Sawing a Woman in Half, but it will hove 

i to keep till next week, as the letters are not 
i right here at present. 

Captain Greenhalgh and his Wild West show 
are in New Zealand, where business is ex 
ceptiona'ly good. 

Paramount's publicity staff, now under th 
direction of Paul Cheyne, has been added t 
by the inclusion of P. L. Curtis, an Adelaide 
newspaper man. 

Doc Henry, well known 
on the road with the Electric Pictures, a tour 
ing fit-up. He is featuring ‘‘Damage.l Goods’ 
and “Fit To Win.” Business very good. 

This week shows a marked improvement in 
business at the various city and suburban the- 

aters. It js a good omen despite the fact that 
the present is the slackest time of the year, 

Laurie Thomas, manager of the Union The- 
aters’ interests at Wagga, a N. S. W. country 
town boasting no less than three picture shows, 
was entertained by the staff last week when he 

/ Was made a valuable presentation. 

My Perth representative informs me that A. 
C. Tinsdale was arrested charged with appropri- 
ating 10.000 feet of negative film and 3,500 
' feet of positive film, the property of C. F, 

Birtles. The material disappeared fifteen 
months ago. Birtles, by the way, is identical 
with the intrepid explorer who has traveled more 


as young as any 


ugias, 


to all showmen, ir 


aad 


aver the arid countries of Australia than any 
ten er His reseerch work has been of ine 
finite valve to tl ernment, for, with only 
a pus ni t > e, he traversed places 
fn West Australia t infested with hostile 
savages, The 7 i e will arouse a great 
deal of i 

Hugh D. Wilson, rey ting the Magnavox, 
has left for N He will remain 
there about two mont which he hopes 
to permanently settle in S&S; iney, where he 
will continue with is entert ment agency, 
as well as promote the interests of the Mag- 
navoz. 

E. J. Carroll, who has just recovered from 
a serious il’ness, will not leave for America 
next month as originally intended, but will 
remain here a little longer. His berth will 
probably be transferred to Tom North, now 


here in the interest of the Dempsey-Carpentier 
fight pictures. 


David N. Martin, chief of the Universal 

y podlicity forces, is putting over some fine 
mewspaper matter in the interest of the “Big 
ad 


‘ Loris ‘Brown, of the 


Ht is still in possession of his mental - 


exhibition to be held at the Town Ha!l next 
April. The affair will be carried out on a 
most lavish scale. 

Phil Gell, who retired from the publicity 
chair of Union Theaters, Ltd., is in hopes of 
connecting with the “Big Four’’ organization, 
Geoflrey Nye, who recently arrived from Ameri- 
ca, favors John O'Donaghue for the position, 
as the latter has assimilated a fine knowledge 
of what is wanted during his recent tour of 
the States, 


Speaking of the “Big Four’? brings reference 
to the fact that Stuart F. Doyle, managing di- 
rector of Union Theaters, entertained Nye, 
Whiting and his wife and Mr. Arthur Pedley 
on a motor trip to National Park last Sunday. 
Mr. and Mrs, Whiting were much impressed by 
the natural beauties of the country. and seve 
eral movie shots were taken for sending back 
to the American offices. 

“Are You Legally Married,” a recently-ar- 
rived film, is now being exploited by Hugh D. 
Wilson. The story is good, but the local cen- 
sors cut out about thirty feet of essential mat- 
ter after the American board had passed it 
as okay, 

Both 
are 


pers, 


the Paramount and Universal forces 
using full-page spreads in the Sunday pa- 
while the Fox people, who are trying to 
get out of most of their existing contracts, are 
paying big money for blank space. For three 
\ecks they have had nothing but the line ‘*Fox 
Films’? on the two center pages of the leading 
cinema trade paper here, and there is every 
indication of a continuance, owing to the heade 
strong tactics of the newly-appointed American 
manager, Walter Hutchinson. Recently this 
firm spent a vast amount of money in a highly- 
colored brochure in furtherance of their forth- 
coming attractions, About twelve pages are 
devoted to full-spead photos of stars whom 
the public knows by heart and, with few ex- 
ceptions, have very little to interest them. T. 
If. Eslick, formerly of the White City, is the 
new publicity manager, but he partly discia'ms 


responsibility. If William Fox knows of this 
it is a wonder he will stand for it. If he 
doesn't, he had better ask for the excellent re- 
sults from his publicity section since Hutchine 
son came over here. 


Last week John W. Hicks, Jr., chief of the 
Paramount forces, tendered an informal luncheon 
to the managers and department heads con- 
cerned in the exploitation of Paramount pictures 
in the Union Theaters’ city houses. Among 
those present were Stuart F. Doyle, Union 
Theaters; O. G, Perry, city manager Union 
Theaters; Ken Wall, publicity manager U. T.; 
J. L. Thornley, manager Lyceum Theater; Gor- 
don QOonrad, manager Auditorium, Me!bourne’s 
Paramount house, and W. Hoggan, Paramount 
sales manager. Much discussion of an in- 
Structive nature took place. These dinners will 
be held as occasion offers and will be of a 
similar nature. 


Lobby display is now a feature at many of 
the more pretentious picture shows, and Hoyt’s 
De Luxe, Sydney, is gaining enviable notoriety 
thru the excellent work of the newly-appointed 
manager, E, Aldridge. 


“The Affairs of Anatol’ is being put over 
amidst a remarkable advertising campaign and 
quite the best seen for some time. The film 
comes right up to expectations, 

James V. Bryson, who first established Uni- 
versal Films in this country, has been sending 
many fine letters to the press, as well as to 
picture men in this country. Bryson, at heart, 
appears to be a very sincere man, but his 
methods were misunderstood at first. Tut we 
ate sound in the knowledge that he has done 
wonders for his film, as well as making quite 
number of friendships that will stand him in 
good for all time. On behalf of a legion of 
them I am requested to wish “Jimmy” all 
the good luck that he feels should come to him. 

Geoffrey Nye has them all coming to him. 
The rvemor—probably right—that he will open 
exchanges in every State has several men 
standing on the doorstep waiting for an 
opportunity to approach him for a possie. 

General Manager Wm. Scott, of Australasian 
Films, is getting everything in readiness for 
his forthcoming publicity campaign. He is out 
with an open challenge that film features re- 
leased this year by his firm will create bigger 
money records than those put out by any of 
the opposition. 


~ 


because it is the only cigarette holder that quickly, effec- 


gold-plated ejector tip. 


ductory price. 


Jobbers—Write to 


ARISIAN FAD—the new cigarette holder—is_pre- 
senting a smoker’s article that wins instant popularity, 


tively and completely ejects all of the stub. 
ISIAN FAD is made of genuine Redmanol with slotless 


Special Sample Offer—for a limited time only we 
wil! send one PARISIAN FAD Cigarette Holder with 
case for $1.50, postage prepaid. 
Money back guarantee. 


Dealers—Order from your jobber. 


Fansian fad % 


Manufacturers and Wholesalers 


SMOKERS’ ARTICLES 


The PAR- 


Worth double the intro- 


Film House, Sydney, is 
uy Bosy on the forthcoming kinema convention and 313 13th Street, OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 
ia 14-Shects $2.50 > 5 Q- 4 
‘ 6-5 ts, $2.50 per 100; 500, $9; 1,000, $14. Sinzle Sheets at double above ~ 
3 ‘4 WIGS Printed in red, Big display type. Ca'ling Cards, 50 for e. :* ond Tarde arab 
i Der 1,000; 100 Letter Heads, 70c; 100 Envelopes, 60c. Dates, Heralds, Dodgers, Pla- 
: AND ALL OTHER SUPPLIES. cards, Window Cards, Cuts, Programs, etc., at less than half the other fellow’s 
Gend for Free Illustrated Catalogue. rice. We print everything aa free. 48-hour service 


WAAS & SON, 226 N. 8th St.. Philadeiphia. Pa, 


order, balance C. O. D, 


resentatives wanted ever 
from this ad. Address 


THE FERGUSON N 


Terms: P € 
ere. (Capital, $50,000.00. Establishe ~d "1008 ) Onde 
TIONAL PRINTING CO., Indianapolis, indiana. 


A CHILD WONDER 


“SON OF PROF. P. J. RIDGE 
The Well-Known Dancing Instructor 


Master P. J. Ridge. Jr., is a wonderfr! al! eround 
child Cancer, and doos_ expert Buck Dansins, both 
Single and doub'e Buck Breats, and does many other 
Sompueeted steps of every description, both soft shoe 

nd eccentric dancin: Master Ridge goes out K 
Ch! cao and leads large a.sembly society danc 
mumbers, and he also has a natural taste for Sesion 
and is well known to all commercial photographers. 
He is both graceful and military im appearance, and 
Very attractive, with large. brown eyes, light blond 
hair and fair skin, and “Is a chip of the old block.” 
HE 1S THE SON OF P. J. R'DGE, THE FORMER 
MANAGER AND PROPRIETOR OF THE WESTERN 
DRAMATIC AGENCY, ETC., AND THE FOUNDER 
OF THE GREAT WESTERN STAGE SCHOOL AND 
NATIONAL SCHOOL OF ha NG, WHERE PRO- 
FESSIONALS ARB PERFECTED, AMATEURS 
TAUGHT AND PUPILS ARE PREPARED FOR THB 
STAGE IN CHORUS WO?K PsNcinGg, TEACH- 
ERS’ WORK, MODERN DANCING. ETC. 


866 CASS STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 


JACK BLUE 


PRODUCER OF 
STAGE DANCES 


The stars I have taught and pro- 
duced stage dances for number 
very many, We all are a little 
selfish and hate to give the other 
fellow credit. I am no exception 
to the rule, but still I do not 
like to make bad friends, That 
is why I do not use names cf 
Stars that I have taught. If 
recommendations will convince 
you, consult the best there are 
in the show business and use 
your own judgment, 


JACK BLUE 


Formerly Dancing Master for 
Geo. M. Cohan, Ziegfeld Follies, 
Dancing Masters’ Normal Schools 
and others, 


STAGE DANCING TAUGHT BY MAIL 
AS TAUGHT BY 


JACK BLUE 


To the American National and 
the American Society of Danci-g 
Masters at their Normal Schools 
and Conventions, Hotel Astor 
and Hotel Majestic, New York, 
Season of 1921, 

Address 


JACK BLUE 


The Blue School of Dancing 


233 West 51st St., New Nor theater 

N Broad A t apito a 
Phone. Cirele 6130 (or JACK BLUE, Thea 
atre, Long Branoh, New Jersey.) 


SCENERY “:orine" 


AMELIA GRAIN, Philadelphia. 


: +f 
a 66 a ——— 
| 
| ooo 
i nN 
| is 
| 
3 hal 
| Nai | 
| Be - 
dt S «sen 
| 5 | a 
—_—— 
NY 
CC | 
SSF | 
— ——e > aoe V7 
“ mm Fe 
Em te 
Z eee FE 
AE Ee 
a Po 
a 
ee ee 
| es Pe 
ee a ) 
| | 
} Po and PLUSH DROPS 
| FOR HIRE 
| | A Catalog. pe 
VEY ' 
V4 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


67 


PROGRESSION 
THE WATCHWORD 


By EDWARD CONARD 


Now and again a writer of things theatrica} 
takes a pessimistic ponder and disgorges a dis- 
sertation on the decadence of minstrelsy, and 
ends his plaint by wishing for the good old- 
time minst-el show of thirty years ago, 

As a matter of fact if a min:trel producer of 
these times should launch such an entertain- 
ment, the length of its duration would be 
gauged by the size of the producer’s bank roll. 
Progression must be the watchword in all lines 
of business in these times, and particularly as 
applied to amusements, 

Minstrel’y, to be successful, must be kept up 
to the times. The day of the linen duster and 
battered silk hat is past—the day when the 
producer of a minstrel show expected and in 
many instances realized one thousand per 
cent on his investment. Minstrel managers 
realize this fact, and, as a rule, are presenting 
productions of the highest class, 

It is not so many years ago that ladies rarely 


attended a minstrel performance on account of: 


the many objectionable features retained by 
managers who could not or would not see the 
handwriting on the wall. The more progressive 
producers eliminated the objectionavle features, 
incorporating clean and wholesome comedy in- 
stead, thereby attracting patronage of a higher 
class, until today minstrelsy is one of the most 
popular forms of entertainment in this country, 
as has been attested by the success of the 
several companies touring this season. They, 
with one or two exceptions, have kept going 
steadily, while many amusement ventures in 
other lines have been forced to discontinue 
owing to lack of patronage. 

It should be the constant aim of the minstrel 
producer to present a clean, up-to-the-minute 
performance. A good minstrel show appeals to 
all classes, presenting as it does a variety of 
splendid entertainment, 

Occasionally one hears the remark: ‘*Minstrels, 
like circuses, are all alike.’ Therefore, for the 
advancement of their business the producers 
should make their shows different, injecting 
new ideas and business and above all keep their 
performances clean, bright, snappy and up-to- 
the-minute, yet at the same time keeping the 
minstrel atmosphere prominent, never losing 
sight of traditional minstrelsy. 

Of course, the personnel of the company has 
all to do with its success. The most gorgeous 
production would be commonplace if presented 
by indifferent performers. A comedian who is 
compelled to resort to vulgarity to provoke a 
laugh, is a comedian in name only, 

Good treatment of employees in any line of 
business creates loyalty and good feeling. Abil- 
ity, loyalty and team work go far towards mak- 
ing a successful and pleasing entertainment, and 
the minstrel manager who is blessed with the 
loyalty and good will of his company is indeed 
fortunate, 

The noonday street parade of the minstrels 
bas been the butt of many a joke and it has 
also been the means of bringing many a dollar 
into the coffers of the minstrel owners. Be- 
6ides, the daily exercise which every member 
of the company must take, keeps them in the 
~ Pink of physical condition. The general public 
judges the merits of the show in advcnce by 
the appearance of the company in the noonday 
Parade. Therefore, it behooves the progressive 
Manager to pay attention to his street parade 
88 well as his performance. 

The minstrel producer should aim to conduct 
his business on the same high plane established 
by the merchant who conducts a successful busi- 
hess, The merchant has the advantage of the 
amusement purveyor inasmuch as he has a 
variety of articles from which to choose, while 
the minstrel merchant has but one line of goods 
for sale—the admission tickets to his enter- 
tainment, 

If the minstre} preducer will ever keep fore- 
most in his mind that he must keep his enter 
tainment on the hightst possible plane of pro- 
Etession, there is no reason why the most popu- 
lar American amusement should not live for 
all time, 


Stuart’s Minstrel Revue is doing good bus!- 
hess thru Jowa, according to word from Ruth 
C. Burba, a member. The attraction will in 
all probability play in Iowa territery until 
the first of April, when it will head Westward 


Minstrel Costumes 


Soonte and Lighting Effects, Byery- 

in Minstrel Supplies. Send 6 
aoe in stamps for our 1922 ““Min- 
strel Surcgestions.”* 


HOOKER-HOWE COSTUME CO. 
} Haverhill, Mass, 


WG 
y S 


Ylllléttd 
= E 
ie) 
| 
H 
Ss 


Willits 


Vdd 


MMM bid 


Vlldbdbdlddes 


Wl 


YZ 


The lilustrations appearing 


Wa 


WH WS 
2 N 
Nese 


= 


= 
S SAS 
“~ 


va 


THEATRICAL ENGRAVERS 
pAND DESIGNERS ~ 


CUTS 


J” theaters, Circuses 


and Carnivals. 

| Duplicates in ELECTROTYPES 
ys STEREOTYPES and MATS. 

N 

| HALF'TONES 


ON COPPER & ZINC 
ZINC ETCHINGS 


OUR DESIGNERS AND ENGRAVERS 
ARE SPECIALISTS IN SHOW WORK \ 


Billboard are made by us. + 
137 W. FOURTH om ‘CINCINNATI, O. 


Bie wx 30% 


ESTY. OLD 


ith 
WA. 


in - 


MM!DONNELL 


PROP. 


QUICK 


tions. 


mercerized Opera 
sizes. 


DELIVERIES OF COSTUMES, 
TIGHTS,WIGS AND MAKE-UP 


Manufacturers and renters of costumes—all descrip- 
Amateur Shows and Minstrels our specialty. 
Complete stock of Cotton and Silkolene Tights, silk and 


Write for Price List. 


CHICAGO COSTUME WORKS 


116-120 N. Franklin Street, -  - 
(New Address) 


Hose, in white, flesh and black, all 


CHICAGO, ILL. 
Phone State 6780. 


John R. Van Arnam’s Minstrels WANT 


BARITCNE PLAYER, must play String in Orchestra; 
Can always use versatile Min: trel Pcople, Musicians, 
26th week this season. A year’s work to real people. 


CORNET, B. SINGERS who dovble Band. 
Sincers, Wandeville “ee. Car show. Now on its 
Grand Opera House, Syracuse, New York. 


ROSE THEATRICAL COSTUME CO. 


COSTUMCS M“DE TO ORDER FROM $ 
Stock of Wardrobe for sale and to rent WATS: ON HAND. 


180 WEST WASHINGTON SiRCCT, 


CHICAGO. 


for the summer. The show is playing one 
and two-night stands. 


Jos. ©. Herbert’s Minstrels, which do not 
Need to resort to burnt cork for the desired 
ebony hue, played to large audiences during 
their recent engagement in Jacksonville, LL, 
and the jokes, the capers of the actors and 
the many songs were so heartily approved that 
the house manager booked the company for a 
return engagement. 7 


Barney Fagan, the veteran dancer of the 
variety and minstrel stage, made a come- 
back at Hartford, Conn., recently. Forty-seven 
years ago he did a song and dance at Roberts’ 
Opera House, Hartford, with Maffit & Bartholo- 
mew’s Variety Show. Fagan played the early 
variety houses and appeared in Hartford with 
many minstrel troupes in the ’70s and ’80s. 


Arthur (Doc) Samson was the recipient of 
a beautiful gold watch recently from his 
vaudeville partner, Louise Paulette, as a birth- 
day present. According to the song and dance 
team, their efforts are being rewarded with 
approval from the audiences in most liberal 
measure. The team will soon return to the 
Last from its Coast to Coast tour. 


There was a team of former minstrels at the 
Palace Theater, Cincinnati, the week of Feb- 
ruary 27, who won decided approval from the 
audiences. Hughes and Debrow weren’t the 
best blackamoor entertainers that have played 
this house this season, but they come very near 


deserving to be so classed. One of the darky 
imitators was unable to appear the last half of 
the week as a result of illness, but the droll, 
happy-go-lucky individual kept the patrons in 
hilarious frenzies with his comedy song numbers 
and quivering of lower extremities, which more 
than made up for the absence of his partner. 


Boone Post of the American Legion of RBel- 
videre, Ill., put on its first annual minstrel 
show at the new Apollo Theater there on the 
nights of February 27 and 28 to crowds that 
filled the handsome new show house recently 
erected by Frank Rhinehart. The show went 
over big, having in its cast several oldtime 
burnt cork entertainers. The Frederic E. 
Howe Amusement Company produced the show. 
Howe declared that in his nineteen years’ ex- 
perience as a producer he had never had six 
better balanced end men than Messrs. Rhine- 
hart, Wright, Loomis, Inman, Anderson and 
Barnes. 


“I want to thank.the many (?) who have so 
kindly donated toward the fund now being raised 
toward the purchase of a new ‘tevrible’ wig that 
I am in need of,” writes ‘Happy’ Senway. 
“So far I have received one two-cent stamp, 
five tobacco coupons, a little crepe hair and 
eighty-seven ‘pannings.’ The coupons I gave to 
the wife, the hair I sent to Bert Proctor, the 
pannings I will keep, and I am using the stamp 
to convey this spasmodic outburst to the min- 
strel editor. No doubt the wig will be blamed 
for the fact that we only work fifty weeks this 
season. So far we have played thirty weeks out 


and if there is any 


of twenty-eight, the wig being so funny. ‘The 
Seven Honey Boys’ doubled up for two weeks, 
playing two theaters each week.” 

Geo. A. Ely, who has traversed and ree 
traversed this great domain with minstrel 
shows back in the ’60s, still enjoys telling 
of his days as a burnt cork entertainer. He 
says there is no comparison between present-day 
minstrel troupes and those like Elwoeod's Fe- 
male Minstrels, Char ey Shay's Liey wood 
Bros.’ Combination, the Original New O:leans 
Minstrels, Madame Rentz'’s Female Minst els, 
Washburn’s, Tony Pastor's, J. H. Haveriy’s 
Mastodon (Minstrels, Duprez and Benedict's 
Minstrels and numerous other real ones he 
can mention. Mr. Ely has in his trunk what 
is said to be a rare col ection of cldtime min- 
strel, variety, circus and dramatic show bills, 


one that desires data of 
the days when the tambo spun his tambourine 
on the tip of his little finger for a full five 
minutes, and the bones successfully imitated 
all the motions and sounds of a barber per- 
petrating a 75-cent atrocity on a customer, to 
write him in care of L. H. Hawthorne, Mid- 


die River, R. D. F. No. 4, Danbury, Conn, 


After a long minstrel career with the leading 
min‘trel organizations of America, including 
the shows of Haverly, George Primrose, Wm. 
H. ‘West and Al G, Field, Billy Beard, one of 
Atlanta’s most popular blackface entertainers, 
will be at the head of his own company of forty 
people. The company will be organized, 
equipped and rehearsed in Atlanta, and be ready 
for the road at the opening of the next theatrical 
according to Mr. Beard, who has filed 
incorporation papers of the Billy Beard Minstrels 
in the Fulton County courthouse. Associated 
with him in financing the enterprise is Haarét 
Weir, well-known business man of Montgomery, 
Ala., who is said to have had wide experience 
in minstrelsy. Mr, Weir will be business direc- 
tor. It is Beard’s plan to make the show dis- 
tinctly and typically Southern in personnel, 
ideas and physical appearance, featuring some 
of the best minstrel talent that the country 
affords. The olio will consist of novelty acts, 
mutica] acts, monologists and others, and the 
show will close with a typical Southern after- 
piece, not deviating for one moment from any- 
thing different than real Negro surroundings. 
There will be just enough newness about it to 
please and just enough of the oldtime flavor to 
relieve it from any charge of iconoclasm. Mr, 
Beard has already taken preliminary steps to- 
ward bringing his people to Atlanta as soon as 
he closes his present vaudeville season. 


season, 


Tae eunser fevers ih Ld bony ace 
bs * ws ap — 
1S BY AN 


“THE PERFORMER” 


(The Official Organ of the Varicty Artistes’ Fed- 
eration and all other Variety Organizations.) 


DEALS bat. VARIETY ONLY AND READ 
BY EVERYONE CONNECTED WITH 
BRITISH VARIETY 
The Live Paper. The Time- Tested Medium fer 
EVERYBODY in British Vaudeville, 
ADVERTISING RATES: 
Whole Page 


OE ERC 3. 

O6F TRG. cneesecunsess 

THE PEnvonmen is filed at a rae BILL. 
OARD Offices in Amer 


Wide Column. 
Narrow Column, 


ar “1 sina 


¢ {8 Charing nied on Lon- 
scorrisit 


Cc. 
OFFICE: 141 Bath Street, Glasgow, 


EVERYORE’S VARIETY 


The title of ‘Australian Variety and The Show Worid’’ 
has been changed to the foregoing. New capital and 
new blood incorporated and a new and virile policy 
adopted. It will continue to cover Motion Pictures, 
Vaudeville, Drama, Circus, Fairs and Chautauquas 
in a trade oo way. The advertising rates remain 
apg py communications should be addressed 
to ARTIN *c BRENNAN, Mor., i14 Castlereagh 
St., gt Australia. 


GODMAN’S DIXIE SERENADERS 
(6TH ANNUAL TOUR) 


WANTED—Colored Performers and Musicians for B. 
avd O. Those deu! lin: state given pr horus 
G'‘ris that can sing and dance Cc n ‘Piano 
Player. Prefer lady State all you first letter 
and salary expected. Long envagement and treatment 
the best. Address AL. C. PERRIN, 13 Main St. 


(Carro] B'dg.), Norwic h, Connecticut. 


Hooker-Howe Costume Co. 
HAVERHILL, MASS. 
Send For Price List of 


Quality Clog Shoes 


AT LIBERTY, March 16th 


For Summer Season. 
BERT PROCTOR, eare Coburn's Minstrels, 
Springfield, Ohio. 


SHOW PRINTING 


New Price List just pone, gene you money. Geb 
t 4 
CURTISS. «= = = ~-  Cobitinental, Obin 


ee 
at 


none Ee 


— 


ine cca taen Rees A, ep aA ett 


Fee me er 
teem ~ 


a ee = m 
Nn nn nc nnn nnn n nnn nn nnn cnnnn nnn nn ncn n cnn ncccnc ccc CR 
— , ae VSS? 0S 9 a em a ememees —— en 
Ti ~~ ec. XN s SP AVA eyed ky 
\ Ws VEE. } _ - N 4 Xs S - N S . aS Sy S \ vy SS : 
i —_— eer” /, SSS B WAX NSSss N } 
XX _ 7 om \ : 
ASS S \ * P 
S \ ; 
iy 
ee N Wee 
—— \\ \ ae 
ENer... a \ i ta 
| 5 MAS. ! Gs Hh 
4 \ | 
— 5g oe ; / 
ES Ga. *] oa 
| a . fe CC 
| 
a : 
oat one a pee #e 
ee ai, 5 Fe tin" | | 
| st aN ; 
' 1 Pe % \ : 
7 | | 
| 
' | 
| 7 | 
P | 
7 \ j | 
| \ | 
es eG mt G ey 
— see SSS | 
Ess ak 
? SE ES ee EEE FS ee 6 ae eee % 
ior ee Ry 
ee 
| A RPS cE AT SLE IEE  CIN, EES E s 
Third Page ....ccccccccsccvcccccccesce S50 ; 
Guarter PAGO ..ccccccssccccecocsesces SOE 
| 
ES RSS SER EE ERE EE I TS TE a a NEEL, LI EDEL OLE ALE BE: 
ee 
—_— -—— ee ; 2 
i , 
ae oe a 
ee ————— fever 
 — ia 
tC CO 
a = | 
4 —— 
: Owe a : 
Lif —___ ti 


& 


The Billboard MARCH 18, 1922 


HOTELS he deems it his duty to fellow players to ag. 


Ne 5 RED THE BILLBOARD HOTEL DIRECTORY | isis:ss0 bres Sat‘pre tint 


: é Bs Conducted by ALFRED NELSON snend nile ner a 
} = ELSE =a embers pro: ession t 
(Communications to our New York Offices, Putnam Bullding, 1493 Broadway) were registered as follows: Detroit recently 
} Charles (Kid) Koster, the burlesque, picture ADVERTISING RATE Hotel Congress—Lester and Vincent, Jimmie 
3. and carnival advance agent, who has toured the Rego and Bob Miller, Murphy and Murpby ang 
country for many years, communicates that One tine, two eolumns wide. Hote] name, address and phone number. 80c for each tame. No ad Tracey and Madame Rebe. 
bal the Edwards Hotel, Kansas City, Mo., is a sccepted for less than five issues. Payable ip advance. ars. B, een ae Denick and wife, 
i : rs, anne 
ee co Sa eenes ont Shite coe CONSECUTIVE ADVERTISING et RS 
: s Consecutive times, one line across two GIGMMD. «+ ncorvorreceronroerecesereeseess seeee og 1 Poldren, Victoria Holt, all from the Shubert. 
The Claytons want all artists traveling to- i3 “ “ “ “ . = ba poocceoncdoceecoepooeocegemecegguocccccces GED Detroit. The following from the Garrick (‘The 
ward Lancaster, Penn., to know that the Ho- Claw = Ivan Wolfe, James Bashiro, A. Kus- 
tel Weber there is again under the manage- ner, Matigg, Bruce, Jos. Granby, John Boye, 
oo of Sam R. Weber, who extends a hearty NEW YORK CITY vara yg Fo — pl Me- 
welcome to the profession and gives them ISTO MOTEL ............ sessseseseesHOl West 44th St. (oft Brondway)..........Brant 1197-8 ° nore Company. 
it good rates. David Gundaker, the hotel clerk, ty ADWAY CENTRAL HATE ......2673 Broadway (at 3d St.) es... sccccce.- Spring 6700 Hotel St. Dennis—Of the “Bert Williams 
ie po is an old j ort HOTEL (Stag)........ .. 48th St. and 8th Ave. in. “Ww. Cor.). .Longacre 5995 Show”, ©. Spencer Charters and wife, Miss 
{ an oldtime artist and assures all of his DE FRANCE HOTEL 142-6 W. 49th Bryant. 8710 “ ’ 
Bat: old associates a pleasant stay at this house. GRENOBLE HOTEL...... [56th St. and 7th A soe Circle 0209 Best, George Forester, Jack Gagen; most of the 
. ns Hope gmNenele ae samt | Secs coms aeaae ee ee oe 
ab : eee ORR nie ryan ats 
Tr The Hotel Arlington, Toronto, Can, under | KING JAMES HOTEL .........222222205. 137-139 West 45th St. 20602020. aeeeitl Bryant 0574 y noel 4 7. SC te 
TB t the management of Mrs, Anna Budd, is one of NASSAU TEL Vevinseccusebeabaneeal 6 Ma. aza 8 $100 “wo - , <r 
‘Tea those homelike hotels that appeals to theatrical REMINGTON Les neeeeeeeeeeeeeenere ~ otel Metropole—Manager Jimmie Fulton and 
4 4 tt as iin end anetusines deme eetiene STANLEY HOTEL......... papechpsabessen {28-126 West a7tn St Bryant 2733-45 wife of the “Golden Crook’’ Company, Miss Bar- 
Ys ments. Mrs. Budd is always there to see that FURNISHED APAKTMENTS rie, Miss Winters, Miss Jones, Miss Brown, 
fs her guests are made to feel at home, which EDMONDS APARTMENTS .............. OE Bryant 0554 Miss Stanley, Dick Hazzard, Arthur Young, 
i €: probably accounts for her ever-increasing LABSOALE CANTON APARTMENTS os ‘ Crete 1108 — ——- Sid ee + wife, as Wil- 
ee patronage of showfolk playing Toronto. jg | €o01 fe apaRTmEenTa °° "* he: ms, Janes Olson, Ensley Sisters, Sid Johnson, 
‘| i Gc SOL R. SaaS bas cmaiesaiee ‘“3I- 33 West gsth DGhvedssebbesccws oi Columbus 2273-4 Map MeKenti, Aad. Gam Sileen, Waker Leb, 
4 ae WHAT OTHERS SAY FURNISHED ROOMS man, Rose Kress and H. deSyivia, trom the 
i : Ya Lima, 0., March @ MANSFIELD HALL........... sececeeeeee +226 We SOUR BE... .ccecceee ceeeeesees ceeeees Clete 2097 Palace Theater. 
a 4 Pla ~ Springfield, O., last week I stopped BROOKLYN, N. Y. The Childs Hotel, Atlanta, Ga., was some 
Mite at md  enatyg ~ bi h is listed in your Hotel JACKIE EDISON THEATRICAL HOUSE..57 Willoughby St. (Opp. Star Theatre) .... Triangle 4381 lively place last week, there being six tabloid 
{i ° ic s Si - 
en Directory. Besides myself, Miss Burke and BUFFALO, N. A — = Sa hee Ge ee oe 
BS Miss Beverly were there, and we all agreed that BARNES HOTEL (Steam Heat, Running Water)... .....000s0e0eee000s laa -++.824 Pearl St. reg ‘<2 tt Gee Cn, ee & 
} , We were never treated better by a hotel man- , . 
; } agement in our many years’ experience in the ATLANTA, GA. Belton, 8S, C., for the last Me days of the 
B} business. The Bancroft is a first-class hotel, CHILD’S HOTEL AND CAFE........... Try eee Phone, Main 2151 week of March 6. ee — Show 
4 not remodeled as most hotels catering to the HOTEL OLIVER 2.20... ...ceeeeeeeeeeee Cor. Pryor and Wousten Ste... kok coc ee ee _ ade Pg and + Aly sa bg 
Gi) tenes tiroout! The sates are very moderate. | wore, pasapena CHICAGO, ILL. snmce tenets ua | Litre slon co, Ssnsny Bat ober ast 
{ . ‘ al ree mee ° eee 
, Mr. Chase, the manager, is ever at your service HOTEL RALEIGH 2000 00000000000000000 “648 N. Dearborn St."°*.-.-- °°” Phone, Supervor 5980 re Minnis, Sid Winters and Alexander 
é a ora, ison an onro an 
1s bees ae bis pone die wie uae 26 WESTMINSTER, HOTELS Rooms, $1.00 and up. 1219°N. Clark St. Loe. Gym. in con, ‘Phone, Sup, 2190 New rehearsal hall bas been put into shape on 
his entire organization. They make the Ban- BOSTON, MASS. — oe rs <a for ply ann 
hy croft as much like home to the theatrical trade HOTEL ALPHIN (Formerly Now Tremont) 331 ON ER OE rofessional Rates ° savece i 
as it is possible for a hotel to be. HOTEL EDWARDS...... robes teneed Bowdein St., neer tate’ House (i minute tree Scelley Square) tion bP ne rye’ wy organize in Atlanta to 
Traly yours, BALTIMORE MD = See 
’ 2 fessional Night has been inaugurated 
ae ACADEMY HOTEL .Howard & Franklin Sts. ..Rates, $7 per week, Single; $10 and $14 Double | 4 mcrncement for Tuesday night of A 
Bill Bailey is the producing maneger of a CARTHAGE, MO. week; a six-piece orchestra furnishes the music. 
show featuring Minnie Burke and her ‘‘Star- EUREKA HOTEL ....... ecovees ccccccce Theatrical People’s HOMO .......-scccceecescsevecsseces Dancing and entertainment by guests AW 
land Girls’, with Johnny Gilmore, playing hotel continue until 2 a.m. Tuesday, Ma 
thro Obio. ‘Like numerous other professionals CINCINNATI oO 6, was the opening night, and the following 


he looks up desirable hotels in The Billboard NEW RAND WOTEL.. coccccccccspesaveesell W. Sth DR cccocecccccccccenveccccesooccMeD 2340 guests were seen enjoying the dance and enter- 


Hotel Directory. Finding them satisfactory CLEVELAND, Oo. 


ATLAS HOTEL ............c00 44th and Prospect Aves, Close to Theatres..Special Weekly Rates 
GIEIIET «00... socaGuceiniter pean w+ East Oth, at ECU iat Pre-War Rates 
povcccece Ceerccvoccoscce and > Roartaem - 1122 Superior Ave, 
eves -» Euclid ) near BE, BERD BR. 200 cece eart of Pjayhouse Square HOTEL GRENOBLE 
CUMBERLAND, MD. 
BALTIMORE HOTEL (European)......... Balto qnd Meohanio Sts.............Manager, &. 0, Heed 7th Ave. and 56th St., 
DETROIT, MICH. TY 
ADDISON HOTEL. Modern. <a A Wee dward and Charlotte.......Ra ates, $200 up NEW YORK Cl 
BRUNSWICK HOTEL (te Rey ates, ey 155 tot: $3.00, Down Town. oo. Cass & Gd. River. Cherry 20 (SUBWAY AT DOOR) 
moret CONGRESS. Down Town........ nN 5 AO . mer St Single; 00 Double orien FAMILY TRAN- 
- ee We ee 2S et entratly e arner oe seeeseee erry ‘i D 
.r MOTEL CHARLEVOIX 0000000002012: leveroaklag Grand’ Clrove Park... ccoc.c0:. Chery (O80 SIENT HOTEL. * Direciy % 
SS HOTEL IROQUOIS, Down Tewn....... Spee. "Theatrical Rates.” 161 Columbia, W... Cadillac 3771 posite Carnegie Music 
os HOTEL LE .. -+»-Down Town, Opp. City Hal Cherry 25 fn the best residential section 
a HOTEL +++ 120 Montcalm St..’ West Main BIBT the city, within two blocks ot 
2 HOTEL Cass and Barley beautiful Central Park and five 
3 HOTEL neers Down Towa, Cor. Woodward and Larned...Phone, Main 5625 es of the theatre and shop- 
P55 wore. . pee. i tates. et Vowa, Cor. inh & Cliferd..- caatued -Cherry 3615 piog centers. For all who desire 
| $1, DENNIS MOTEL. .c0ccccclesceesscsore Clifford and Bagley. s..c-ss- se svsees,cJGherry $610 ~ e- e  -p - * 
FLINT, MICH. ing alone, the Grenoble is unsar- 
¢ FLINT HOTEL ........ sigaaneaemnal Four Blocke N. of Ry. Station and Palese.........61 ep 7 ae os am 
GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 
i. PUNERIID MIBUUR...cdccncncrsasensssatl -Best in Michigan ...... 000000 ce coCnmemOMarURETETEEL esse WE CATER TO THE PROFESSION 
HOMESTEAD, PA. Theatrical Rates, $13.00 Up. 
WHEN YOU GO Ore WNIT BOUL. «0.2050 . 122 W, Eighth Ave............ ceeseemecerees MO Phones TELEPHONE CIRCLE 0909 
SAINT LO HOUSTON, TEX. 
STOP AT BULBV NOVEL ...ccccccrccccccccced Cor, Texas Ave, and Travis St....Special Rates to the Prof, 
Hotel ANS er nea HOTEL REMINGTON 
HOTEL METROPOLE.............. v+sseecTonth and Wyandotte Ste... -... Bell Phone, Main 4821 
fin Pp PONSIANIA HOTEL. Rooms and stitchonettes, ia0F- 1, tA andre = Piet asiona a 
129 WEST 46TH STREET 
Gl in LA FAYETTE, IND. NEW YORK CITY 
art ye RAINBOW HOTEL .......ceee0ee0e0es ...523 Main St, near Mars Theatre....Professionsl Rates in ee, te 
LIMA, oO. found at the Remington, 
Locust Street at «A HOTEL CADILLAC...........cccceceecees NeXt DOOr OFPheUM ........ccceea ceseeeecStSO@GESO Hotel Thoroughly Renovated. 
Three blocks from Union Station “LOS ANGELES, CALIF. SPECIAL RATES TO PROFESSION 
New 12 Story Fireproof Building WOLLYWOOD .  svuseventneeide nll Hollywood Bivd. & Highland a HARRY MOSS, Manager. 
Finest Transient and Residential OTEL BROADWAY ".......0..........205 Broadway........ seoscrerece MP ROR® Piew O75 
Hotel in St, Louis. In the heart LOUISVILLE. KY. 
of the Wholesale and Retail GIBSON HOTEL..........00..-seeeeeeeee 49 &, Third St. (bet, Market & Mala).......Mele lg 
/ Shopping District. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. HOTEL NORMANDIE 
350 Large Light Airy eneie HOTEL MAJESTIC ..,.Hennepin Ave, and Seventh St.....Professional Rates. Phone, Main 7060 
| Private Tub Bath in leach Room NEWARK, N. J. BROADWAY AND 38TH STREET. 
mag | i ta — Every thaw THEATRICAL HOUSE ~..™” 198 306 Washington Ste “Blocks irom’ fi . Sitehell ell 2008 The gaat a wren in Theee, 8 Square. 
| fort and Convenience. OKMULGEE, OKLA. on oan a — Cold 
| EER er d 
| European Plan—Rates MARQUETTE. HOTEL shieebeneteuae Entirely aon. hates $1 and $1.50. ‘West’ ce Fates. a Running Water. "10380 W oth: out. one. 
75 Rooms at $2.50 a day " PITTSBURG, _PA. awe " 
i 100 Rooms at $3. MOTEL CARR .....csceeeseeeereeeeeeees 326-328 Penn Ave, ............. sssre+ePhone, Court 9090 WE CATER TO THE PROFESSIO 
100 Rooms = = 302de VORK DOVEL veccovcccecccccccsese vers E, Diamend ce At OWI oo. ieeeseeeee Coder 9542 KAY BERGER. Manager. 
fa el apie SHREVEPORT, LA. 
+e “Virtchepanmragd ap taat CRESWELL HOTEL ...... snocueienntanill BIE Dhccocccccvccessesee ee : — 
bel oe — ST. LOUIS, MO. EDMONDS APARTMENTS 
. or Wire for Reservations. Oe eC, nsnseounhiedal W. Cor 14th & Chestnut Ste. -Alamac Hotel 
5,1. MSYER, ee METROPOLE HOTEL ecdicditens . Rat £2 = 1 ‘Washineton a Cafeteria Service T7077 ORNISHED’ APA RIMENTS 
se THE AMERICAN ANTER oon ete ane Markel Bt en, Soeelal Theatrical wo —~ ma Reasonable rates. Strictly 


trical 
MRS, GEO. W. DANIEL, Proprictor. 


oN : y i 
A 
; ) TE — me 
og ——___ —_— 
i 
ic Ss an ly Cl een 
RSE rc Seana nema oR ee Wr = 
i 4% a 
| 
4 
a 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard | ’ 


69 


tainment: H, F. Kennedy, wife and sister; 
Harry Myers, Bob Broadley, Sam Meiley, Dan 
Russell (and wife), producing comedian for Nat 
Ferber's Show; as well as Red Mack, comedy 
of the same show; Al Lawrence, Thomas Mul- 
ialy and wife, A. J. Miller, Bennie Smith of 
Kinston, N. C., known from coast to coast; A. 
Wood, George Raymond, the Human Fly; Jack 
Collins, George B. Gardner and wife, Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl L, Myers, Sid Winters, R. Newton 
Ross and Earl Noyes (and wife), owner of the 
U. S. Exposition Shows. 


Also Paul Lester, Teddy Witzell, Al Ridge. 
way, Billy Houston, J. R. Wilson and wife; 
Nat Ferber and wife, Paul Ellwood, Dave L. 
Tennyson of African Comic Opera Company; 
Smiling Tom Edwards, day clerk; Bob Cain 
and wife, Bill Leight and wife, M. M, Blum 
(and wife), manager Geiger Hotel, Savanneh, 
Ga.; J. A. Hamilton and wife; J. T. Turner 
(wife, son and daughter), proprietor of Childs’ 
Hotel; Elizabeth York, Mabel Clark, Bimbo 
Davis and wife, Pricila Novak, Hannah Trip- 
lets, Leau Stewart, May Allen, Four Neaumans, 
Sue Veith, Mildred Baker, Atlanta’s favorite 
society and club entertainer; Margaret Knight, 
Billie Tucker, Billie Scott, Louise Wright, three 
Crane Sisters, Irene Bori, Alma Davis, Elsie 
Comb, Peggy Siddell and Jack ©. Phillion.: 


De FRANCE 


142-146 West 49th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 


A modern hotel in the heart of Times 
Seuare, near all Theatres and Clubs, 
hort blocks to N. V. A. 


WE CATER TO THE | PROFESSION 


HERMAN ESKER, | ECKER, Manager. 


—HOTEL— 


—— 
—KING JAMES HOTEL— 


“A Populer Hotel in Times Square.” 
137-139 WEST 45TH STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 


Ah the comforts of a large hotel will be found 
here, with the privacy of a family hotel. 
WM, GROSSMAN, Manager, Tel., Bryant 0551. 


HOTEL WORTHY 


THE BILLBOARD HOTEL DIRECTORY 


(CONTINUED) 
SPRINGFIELD, O. 


BANCROFT HOTEL Caters to Theatrical People. 


TEXARKANA, TEX. 


COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL ....................Opp, Union Ss ccevtedadadehendendeedsile tie 


_ TORONTO, ONT., CAN. 


tiees cooceneoooe OOt King and John 


WORCESTER, MASS. 


CoPvcccecccccocccscce . | Minute from City Hall... 


European Plan. All Reoms with Bath. Good Foed 


Sts............Phone, Adelaide 7600 
te 110 King St West ...........Phone, Adel 3106 


-Rates, $1.00 per Day and up 


Suitable for the A. ‘VI 
Violin, alt n Angie. ES, a or other 


JUST OUT, Four Themes by Beethoven, For Orchestra 


occasions. 


ition, se nothing missing, playable with any combination. Engraved 
notes. Best paper. ot) pa. Pa., a 25¢. Single Parts, 10¢c. AT THE FOOT OF THE 
Cuoss, sacred solo, 80c. hecetdied ob R. & Vocalstyle Rolls. ‘Compositions by new writers con- 


THE INVINCIBLE MUSIC CO., BROADWAY AT Sist ST., SUITE 701-A, NEW YORK 


Arranged so oe everyone can play them. 


ROLL TICKETS 


J. T. SHOENER 
SHAMOKIN, 


CASH WITH ORDER—NO. C. 0. D. 


Printed to your order—all one wording —4 OO, ‘elete) for 


10,000 for $4.50. 20,000 for $7.50. 50,000 for $10.00. 


UNION 


PA. LABEL 


$15:59 


SECOND HAND TRUNKS 


Extra strong, heavy duck-covered Trunks, in good condition, sizes 
$6x23x25 and 34x23x25, at.......ccccccce sn 
Fibre Shoe Trunks, in perfect condition, just like new (not patched); 
sizes 32xj5x32 and 30x15x29, at. de te 


—- oe ~Fome have son <Taays. 


‘COMMERCE TRUNK CO. 


$8.75 


$11.75 
25% deposit with order. 
174 W. Van Buren St, CHICAGO 


eee ee eee ee ee oe 


ATTENTION 


MANAGERS SUMMER RESORTS, Etc. 


sh Music and Entertainment. (Tell us 
MULLINI & SMITH ENTERPRISES, 59 East Van Buren St., Room 310 (Ph., 


what 
— 0447), CHICAGO. 


LINCOLN APARTMENTS 


306-310 WEST SIST ST., NEW YORK. 
HIGH-CLASS ELEVATOR APTS. 


NIEL. | Prep. 


Under personal man 
MRS. GEO. W. DA 


HOTEL PLYMOUTH 


38th Street, Bet. Qreatuey & 8th Ave.. 


ew Y ity. 
SPECIAL RATES TO PROFESSION, 
New mm management. 


Write for reservations. 


WHEN IN PITTSBURG VISIT 


\sAM CANTER'S RESTAURANTS 


624 Penn Ave, Phone, Grant 9523. 


SPECIAL 


TO THE PROFESSION 


AT LAST REAL CORRECTLY MADE 


DANCING a 


An oe a oY 


GORE WEB 
ELASTIC 


Give waist and hip measure, Sent prepaid upon 
receipt of price. 


ILLINOIS SURGICAL APPL. CO. 


212 W. Madison St., - CHICAGO, ILL. 


SHOW PRINTING 


New Price List just issued. Saves you money. 
curt: it TODAY, 
SS, __- Continental, Ohio. 


1.00—PERSON 
100 Se pind Lote anes LOR ERY T6100 nite 


Linen Finish P.per, Your name and ad printed 
in tes 1 e@ and address 
Ba " pA SHOP. 1512 


STAGE EMPLOYEES AND PROJECTIONISTS 


By WESLEY TROUT | 


Brother Hodges is operating at the Majestic 
Theater, Enid, Ok He is an A-1 projectionist 
and stage employee, 

———— a 

3. K, Pronner is still on the road projecting 

pictures in small towns of the North, 


T. F. Starer “shoots” from Waco, Tex.: “Just 
a few lines to let you know that show business 
is very good in this part of the State. Depart- 
ment is certainly improving each week."’ 


Are you going on the road this summer again 
with the 8, W. Brundage Shows, Jimmy London? 
And are you still at the Rialto Theater taking 
tickets and doing ‘“‘props’? Let us have the 
*dope.”* 


A postcard from friend G, K. Wreavery lets 
out the information that he is still at Houston, 
Tex,, taking life easy for the winter months. 
He writes: ‘“‘No business much around these 
diggin’s at present. Will again go on the road 
this coming summer, 

———e 

Comes the information that business is very 
good at Oklahoma City theaters. All the brothers 
are working. There are now four theater supply 
houses in Oklahoma City and all are doing a 
very good business, 


Brother W. T. Looney, stage carpenter at the 
Rialto Theater, Denison, Tex., informs that the 
T. M. A, lodge there, organized a year ago, has 
given up its charter. Brother Looney was sec- 
retary of this lodge, 

oe 

The projectionists at Enid, Ok., inform that 
they will have their own charter in a few 
weeks. The local will not be a mixed local any 
longer. Each local will have its own separate 
charter. 

nee 


The stage employees and projectionists at 
Gainesville, Tex., write that they bave given up 
their T. M. A. charter. This was due to not 
being able to secure members enough to keep 
the lodge together. ‘Theaters are all doing a 
very nice business in this city. ' 


Farl Boyer, projectionist, is operating at the 
Liberty Theater, Heavener, Ok. He has two 


generator set was recently installed and is 
proving a success in the way of securing good 
screen projection, Theater is doing a very nice 
business, 

—_—— 

Dallas, Tex.—Business seems to be very good 
here. The Old Mill Theater is doing a nice 
business with pictures. The Majestic, now run- 
ning vaudeville and pictures, is doing capacity 
business. The brothers write that they have 
had a very pleasant season. Every theater in 
the city has signed up and all the theater supply 
houses are employing I. A. men. The brothers 
have given up their T. M. A, charter, 


G. H. B. Yonkers, N, Y.+-Yes, Brother James 
Lemke, international president, carries a card 
out of the stage employees’ local. Brother 
Frank LeMaster is out of the stage employees’ 
local at Denver, Colo., No. 7. Brother Dolliver 
is a projectionist and carries a card out of the 
projectionists’ local at San Francisco, 


oe ee 


The writer would like to hear from Brother 
A. Dohring, stage manager at the Orpheum Thea- 
ter, San Francisco, at once. Several letters have 
been written you, Brother Dohring. Why don’t 
you answer? It is very important that I hear 
from you. 

“It is indeed a pleasure to see the boys send- 
ing interesting news items,” writes J. K. 
Presserz. ‘“‘I am touring the Eastern States 
with a dandy feature picture, and it is going 
over big in the many small towns. Carry a good 
line of advertising that draws the business. Am 
carrying my own portable projection machine 
and can run in any theater or school house.”’ 


We are informed that Brother Charley C. Shay 


_will run for the office of international president 


of the I. A. at the coming convention. He has 
fully recovered in health. He is not only willing 
to again assume the office he voluntarily re- 
linquished, but says he proposes to make a 
fight for it. Shay has always been fair to the 
projectionists, as well as the stage employees, and 
has always appointed a projectionist to fill the 
office as assistant international president. 
Brother Shay carries a card out of the stage 
employees’ local, 


GermantowD tate type projectors, motor driven. A motor Kansas City, Kan.—Brother Wing is now pro- 


Jecting pictures at the Twelfth Street Theater. 


\Panl McOullough is projecting pictures at this 


vheater. B. Hudson is assistant stage manager 
and F, E. Bailey stage carpenter at the Or- 
pheum. Felix Snow is stage manager at Gayety. 
There are quite a few visiting brothers in this 
city, and many of them are working as extra 
projectionists and stage employees. There are 
a few brothers with road saows. 


From M. H. Exterer, stage employee, comes 
the following letter: ‘‘I have been a reader of 
The Billboard for many years and have always 
gathered some very valuable information from 
it. Your department and Patterson James’ are 
the ones I most enjoy. Your I. A. department 
carries some very interesting news each week. 
Am staying in Kansas City for the present.” . 

Brother Ed. Shaw, stage employee, Little 
Rock, Ark., is working at the various theaters 
in that city. He has been out quite a few years 
with a large carnival company. Brother Shaw 
has been sending in some mighty interesting 
news items each week. He was elected press 
secretary at the last regular meeting, and is 
proving that he is a real live-wire press agent. 

Enid, Ok.—Local 312, stage employees and 
projectionists, inform the writer that the Amer- 
ican Theater in this city was on March 1 de- 
clared ‘“‘unfair’? to organized labor, Manager 
Guy Darling refused to pay the scale asked by 
the local. The present scale is $45 for projec- 
tionists and the same for stage carpenter, for 
eight hours a day. The American Stock Com- 
pany is still at this theater and advertising that 
they are 100 per cent Equity. A committee has 
been appointed to advertise the theater as un- 
fair. All other theaters in this city have signed 
the 1922 contracts with the brothers. The mu- 
sicians’ local has taken out all of its musicians 
at the American. The brothers fee) that it will 
be but a short time until they will have this 
theater signed up again. The following brothers 
were working at this theater before it was 
placed on the unfair list: Ray Ott, carpenter; 
Grant Davis, grips; R, Wilson, master prop- 
erty man, and George McCann, chief of projec 

tion. 


PERSONAL APPEARANCE 


is now more than ever the key-note of success. 
Bow-Legged and Knock-Kneed Men and Women. 
boih young and cld. will be glad tc hear that I 
have now ready for market my new appliance, 
which wil] successfully straichten, within a short 
time, bowleggedness and knock-kneed legs. safely. 
quickly and permanently, without paim operation 
or discomfort. Wil) not interfere with your daily 
work, being worn at night. My new “Lim- 
Straitener,”” Model 18, U. S. Patent, ts easy to 
adjust’ its result will save you soon from further 
humiliation, and improve your personal appear- 
ance 100%. 

Write today for my free copyrighted physiolog- 
feal and anatomical book. which tells you how 
to correct bow and knock-kneed legs without any 
obligation on your part. Enclose a dime for 
postage. M. TRILETY, SPECIALIST, 
186L, Ackerman Bidg.. Binghamton, N. Y. 


SHOW 
PRINTING 


Heralds, Tonighters, Dodgers, Tack and 
Window Cards, Half - Sheets, One- 
Sheets, Three-Sheets, Cioth Banners, 
Card Heralds, Letterheads, Envelopes, 
Etc. Type Work Only. No Stock Pa- 
per. Everything Made to Order. Don’t 
order from old price lists. Save delay 
and misunderstanding by writing for 

present prices on the forms you want. 
GAZETTE SHOW PRINT, Mattoon, Ill. 


IDEAS CREATED FOR TYPE-PRINTED AD. NOV- 
ELTIES. It’s the snappy idea that attracts in print- 
ing. About one print shop in fifty cam create ideas. 
Hence the reason for idea-drawing specialists. We 
are experts in type structure displaying. Also skilled 
in paper and ink harmonizing. ‘‘There With the Ber- 
ries (Ideas) That Attract.” HOLLEY’S TYPO- 
GRAPHIC STUDIO, Northfield. Vermont. 


THE BRAZILIAN AMERICAN 


The Only American Publication in Brazil. 


Titustrated. Filled with news and information 
about the richest end most fascinating country 


in 
two continents. 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICD, $8.00 A YEAR, 
(Send for sample copy) 
BRAZILIAN AMERICAN, 
Avenida Rie Brenee 117, 2 Ader Rile de Jencire, Grams 


> yee 


Com 


a | 
ARLINGTON HOTEL .. | 
HOTEL EDMONDs .....| 
= eS H | 
eS 
ene hy eae 
eee ail] 
weg hid | 
ee | 
| 
| 
: 
| | 
=| 
| ae | 
‘ 74! 
SS 
= eC ; eS : | . | | : 
4 ‘ : a ft \ $j te : 
EARN at RN STRSTR ESAT SEILER A SRY BO” ASST nA Se SE ASPET PDD OARS ° 4 ; : i . 
Sen | | As || as | be y 
eee om | i a Me 
: : i fF | iy bse a t , 
— 
_— 
_ a 
a ———— 4 
2 So i WLsura.appce. seen : 
ADE Xs. , iy We, . 
BESTGRADE \—7 15 SN 
| He i it ss 
Ua ee 
Pe ee 6 
fat 
Heenan . i : 
a as | | 


it 
ty 


The Billboard 


MARC*4 18, 1922 | 


COY HERNDON 
Tells How He Did It 


Coy Herndon was born in Palatka, Fia., 
September 23, 1892, and received his early edu- 
cation at Orangeburg, 8. C. 
From these be ran away from home June §&, 
1909, and went with the F!orida Blossom Min- 
strels. Still in his teens, he left school to 
battle against the world and all he possessed 
was eight bicycle hoops and fifty cents in 
money. He laughingly tells vou the hoops were 
not honestly acquired, rea'izing that he had 
tackled one of the hardest jobs in the theatrical 
business, ‘‘Novelty."” His climb ng the ladder 
of success was due to his personality, patience 
and practice. 

His rise in the theatrical world has been 
rapid. He was next engaged for the Billie 
Kersand Minstrels, and then to the Nashv lle 
Students, a Western show, there remaining for 
eight years, in the last four of which he was 
general manager and half owner. He next 
played the Pantages Circu’t (in vaudeville), 
and was engaged by the late Eph Williams’ 
Silas Green Co., where he rose after the first 
season to general manager of the company. 
It was while he was with the Silas Green 
Show that he was engaged by Howe's Great 
London Circus, distinguish'ng himself as the 
first Negro feature ever with a circus, 

The program o? Howe's Great London Cir- 
cus shows the billing of Herndon completely 
across the program, alone. And altho several 
acts worked while he did, Horndon utilized 
four minutes for his feature numbers, which 
newspapers havs said were sensational, 

Season 1921, be was engaged by Roscoe & 
Hockwald as a feature with the Famous 
Georgia Minstrels, where his popularity ex- 
panded greatly. 

When the Page interviewed Herndon asking 
how it all came about (the engagement with 
the circus), the publ'city given him on the 
program, his private state and dressing room, 
he said, “It was all an accident’; however 
he related a little story that may have led up 
to it. ‘‘I was general manager for Prof. Eph. 
Williams’ Silas Green Co. When we were 
very much in need of musicians and perform- 
ers, bav'ng always believed in the old adage, 
Self preservation is the first law of nature.’ 
I ventured over to the John Robinson Circus, 
of which Jerry ‘Mugavin was manager. There 
I started to promoting musicians, which is 
taking a long chance on the Mugavin interests. 
However, I was succssful until Mr. Mugavin 
learned of this and raised four of the mus- 
cians I had promoted three dollars extra on 
the week. 

“Later on in the season Prof, Williams 
made a payment on a tent that he was to buy 
after the close of the season. When the season 
closed I went to Hollywood, Miss., to make 
the final payment on the tent, and bring it 
back to the show in Florida. After introducing 
myse‘f to Mugavin he said: “Oh, you are Hern- 
don! Well, Herndon, you owe me sixty dollars 
extra, due to your crooked promoting. I 
raised my musicians three dollars extra to 
keep them.’ I was scared to death, but only 
smiled, and after talking to him a few min- 
utes I squared up with him, Later on that 
winter one of his managers saw the act with 
the Silas Green Co., and wrote to Mr. Mugavin, 
telling him that he had found a wonderful 
act that would be a feature with the white 
tops, and something new that had never been 
presented with a circus. BUT the artist is 
COLORED, and he is the very same man that 
caused the three dol'ars extra raise on his 
hoop act, and was brought up as the possi- 
bilities of placing a NEGRO act with the 
circus, 

“Mr. Mugavin expressed himself as willing 
to place the act and putting confidence in me, 
that if I was able to ‘square’ up with him, 


State College, 


COY HERNDON 


Coy Herndon, hoop-rolier. who with Allie John- 
son, a wire walker, is signed this season with 
the Patterson Trained Wild Anima) Circus. He is 
@ real artist. 


TAINESONS PAGE, 


IN THE INTEREST OF THE COLORED ACTOR, 


ACTRESS AND MUSICIAN OF AMERICA 
(COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR NEW YORK OFFICES) 


I could certainly take care of the inferior ar- 
tists that I would have trouble with, should 
there be any such, as the higher salar'ed acts 
are the most congenial and broad-minded peo- 
ple in the world. It is those misguided fifteen- 
dollar-a-week actors that may cause trouble. 

“From a child I have seen many a circus, 
but never bave I witnessed a colored artist 
acting, unless be was riding a mule or some- 
thing similar. I wondered why it was. Now 
I know. There are two reasons, their mean- 
ing is different, but they are as closely related 
as brothers are to sisters. They are ineffic-ency 
and prejudice. Our knowledge and ski'l along 
the line of acting must be proven without a 
doubt, owing to the abil'ty of the artists of 
the white race. After you have the act, the 
next thing to do is to place it; then you have 
prejudice to fight, which is just as bad as not 
having an act. It’s a fight to get it, and a 
fight to do it, and the channels of diplomacy 
are the course to pursue. I am greatly eatis- 
fied with the achievement of two Negro fea- 
tured acts under the white tops, but not con- 
tented until I see at least four or five.”’ 

This season Herndon and Allie Johnson are 
with the Patterson Wild Animal Show. 


FAIRFAX COLORED FAIR 


The Colored Fair Associaton of Fairfax 
County, Va., has announced its dates as Octo- 
ber 11 to 13 at Providence Heights, Va., one 
mile west of Falls Church. The official staff 
is: A. T. Shirley, president, Herndon, Va.; 
W. A. West, secretary, Vienna, Va., and Harry 
Hartman, publicity man, Rockville, Md. 

Mr. Hartman announces that the directors 
have authorized the use of the new issue of 
Donaldson Lithograph Company paper, two lines 
of which have been especially designed for 
colored fairs. 

Since the location is but twenty minutes’ ride 
from the national capital, it is on'y reason- 
able to expect a large attendance if ‘the at- 
tractions are up to standard and the billing 
heavy enough to bring the fair to the notice 
of the city and its environs. 

As to the attractions Mr. Dudley has been 
offered the date if he decides to place his carni- 
val jn the field. This and the Lexington (Ky.) 
fairs have addressed him directly. If ten more 
dates are offered he will accept the responsibil- 
ity of an all-colored aggregation, 


This band, 


under the management of Mr. amd Mrs. Hemry Allen, and directed by Prof. Lockwood, 


a former minstrel band leader. was the musical attraction at the Shriners’ Comvention, St. Louis; the 
big Lexington (Ky.) Colored Fair and several other fairs last season. The boys are surprisingly clever, 


NEGRO EXPOSITION IN 1923 


Jacksonville, Fla., March 9.—Announcement 
was made here this week that tentative plans 
have been drafted for a Negro National Edu- 
cational and Industrial Exposition in 1923 (July 
or August) at Jacksonville. The grounds for 
holding same and a draft of necessary build- 
ings have already been procured. This enter- 
prise is said to be the result of consultations 
which have been carried on between a large 
number of public-spirited persons of the United 
States and several small foreign countries thru- 
out the past two years. 

The promoters state that, @esides the realiza- 
tion of the importance of giving the world an 
opportunity to become acquainted with the 
real achievements and progress of the Negro, 
it is recognized that the assembling of these 
achievements will greatly stimulate the higher 
and better qualities of the race and tend to 
solidify energies and aspirations. 

Works of merit in literature, art, science, 
invention, industry, agriculture, etc., are to 
be played in this exposition. Musical attrac- 
tions of the highest order are being reserved. 
Competitive vocal and instrumental contests 
open to the world and many other unique fea- 
tures never before announced are expected to 
appear on the program. 


LINCOLN PARK IMPROVED 


W. J. Whiteman, the manager of Lincoln 
Park, Savannah, Ga., announces that the old- 
est resort in that State will be opened for 
the season on April 16. Several new attractions 
are being installed and Price’s Jazz Band and 
the Black and Tan Orchestra have both been 
engaged to enliven things. 


WESLEY VARNELL’S REVIEW 


(Star Theater, Shreveport, La., Feb. 27.) 


The Slim & Rosa Henderson Company, this 
week's attraction, proved to be a remarkable 
attraction. It is better than a ninety per 
cent offering. Had a real plot, albeit with a 
story of decided advantage to the comedian. 

The troupe includes S!'m Hendersonand Royal 
Sutton as comedians, Chas. Hart as straight, 
Rosa Henilerson, leading lady; Isabelle John- 
son, soubret and Irene Thomas, prima donna. 
Lou'se Sutton, Jennie Hill, Isabelle Dabner and 
Elizabeth Smith are in the chorus. The latter 
is on the sick list. 


Miss Henderson opened the show with the 
chorus and went fair. This was followed by 
Comie Sutton, who earned but declined an en- 
core, 

The story is of course a light one, the two 
comedians coming to town with plenty of 
money and losing it to the straight’s skin 
game, the whole ending with counter arrests 
and accusations that provided plenty of laugh- 
ter. During the action Miss Thomas scored 
with a song and Mr. Hart executed a clever 
dance speciality. 

Miss Henderson added a song. Miss Johnson 
put one over, then the two Hendersons showed 
their team work to good applause. The show 
closed with Sutton and the chorus. The humor 
was constant and to judge by the applause that 
interrupted the comedians it may be regarded 
as a show that registered well. 

Litte Miss Smith is suffering from an ac- 
cident due to a fall on the cement floor of a 
dressing room in Memphis. 


COLORED FAIR IMPROVEMENTS 


The Views of a Practical Showman 
Expressed 


By OSCAR JENKINS 


I have talked improvements for colored fairs 
from Pennsylvania to Georgia and you will 
find jt about the same everywhere. I nasve 
talked to the big colored fair officials and the 
smal] ones. I find the only way to get things 
right is to put two colored carnivals in the 
fieid. I may talk to a colored fair official two 
hours and when I get thru he may say o.k., 
but he doesn’t understand. They are all in 
for colored attractions, but how are we to 
show them they are colored attractions? Col- 
ored attractions like all other attractions are 
found in big cities and the fair officials are 
on or near the farms. 

Now, we may talk fair improvements for the 
next twenty years but won't gain anything rn- 
til we set up the big show and then we are 
going ahead. Every colored outdoor showman 
will agree with me. One carnival will do 
more to jmprove conditions than all the talk- 
ing and writing would do for a ye@r. 

There is no question about it. Others are 
getting what we should have. You can’t blame 
fair officials, They must have attractions. Now 
who is it =p to? Do you remember the old 
saying? I can show you better than I can 
tell you. Well, that is what we neod. We 
have race men in every line of the game. 
There are race men owning rides. And *he 
main attraction at a county fair is the plaut 
show. We master that. The thing to do is, 
first show the big colored fairs, then the reet 
would fall in line. 

I received a letter from a friend teiling me 
he is depending on me to book his eight run- 
ning horses, also jumpers, with colored jockeys 
in gay colors. I received ten letters from 
colored concessioners wanting to know if I 
was taking out a carnival this season. Now 
this is what I found at the Columbia (8. C.) 
colored fair last November. The carnival owner 
told eight of us colored fellows if we set 
up on the midway we pay him $50 cash or not 
at all. Mind you he was selling all colored 
fairs. Now, colored showmen, it is there for 
us, but if we don't get it the other fellow will. 

The assistant secretary of the Columbia (8. 
C.) Fair told me he longed to see the day 
when the midway is lined up with colored at- 
tractions. To have a real good fair it mast 
be clean. The association must book clean 
attractions. I am opposed to gambling and 
immoral shows. The association should. book 
up-to-date free attractions and. good horse ra- 
cing and have a clean midway with something 
new every day that will enable all to get some 
money and pay privilege and not let two of 
three gambling games get all. 

That places the officials on a clean avenue 
with the law, also the attractions. Now, boys, 
have you seen the season come to a close 500 
miles from home and no money? While the 
other fellow had a big bank roll, you worked 
hard all season and closed with no money? 
That accounts for it. You never had an equal 
chance. Now, boys, talk up the idea of colored 
carnivals, Look at all of our big cities with 
all of our organizations, clubs and lodges. The 
other fellow’s carnival must play for us. Why 
not a colored carnival? A party, head of a 
big outfit, said the biggést business he played 


(Continued on page 72) 


OSCAR JENKINS 


A thoro!y experienced representative of the 
outdoor show world. He has been a concession 
operator, a lecturer, has managed exhibits at 
fairs, has d dance pavil! and has even 
owned a carnival. After mary “‘ups and 

is engaged to manage Fairmount Park at 
ton, D, C, rr 


@eesescae $2 


arernmeen wowgroenwrreeaen +~4 


—e @ «= © of © oo 


i 
| imi ee es 
: ee eereennenmmmmeneemeeeneeeeeee nae aa nay sanesanasnsanmsnmamennamnmnnsanapsapsneanemenamnemasnaamneanammamaamaaaaamammanaaa aaa eee 
ey —_— ee 
i U (a a —— 
oe 1 if 
i : pe a 
24 } 1 
: L es 
i 
iy 
: o— 
a Se 
i | Sl 
At 
| eS 
| thi 
Ne 
i} pas 
a : * 
the 
I. 
(2 
Tee 
| ; 
: + 
EL BEE ARATE LEE I EEF ETE 
: We 2, @ Pig ss Lk aan ee eS A 
[4 a) Ul, re SS hia 
1 “fF \ ) es ee se a 
1% | eae Se +e a ‘ aes eT me & Ro Ae 
f ; aa : per Te a a ; # % ee a. 4 o -— o ; . 3 { 
rite or ee ae = - Se eee 
CG. ase ry < i “ i. Gx... re cy io — 
| INET A 7 eae car td. ae a 4 y = 
P tal 3 ie aos e . pp a ; 
; ei Mar 2° & § SH Pi wR. y 
: < 4 14 iz a ig ~— SS 
: Pa By ® io * ! ae h =e ~~ <a + * ry 
ae” : - ae ae = pis . ; ay. . a 
a bea: * a ee : % - ” XY. : W ies 
ES Ne Ae LA Sp oe ef | hast | 
7 oY Sar “s. & 2, ure, © A ‘ a -m T, at 
Way, ke Sen CR ee 
Bey ed Y af ~ & j= SS (ee = Wie 
ao UY TR nae 
Rees x Ie OD ee | 
‘ a 
ee a 
mr OO 
eS es es 
- - ee = on = — ona ahs . } 
PO re ’ e. : pst 3 7 4 
caaenenitite a As 
oe a - 
“ 7 - “ he 
r — ; fo$4 2 ‘ 
ieee * j ; 
—— tit —— a : bi 
a ig ee oS iaiaes “a at 
Fa atk 4 Ex ine e e. , a ee : : Pe d 
, He fg i ‘*, 1 Pe ae Sak * 7 
7 Sg 2 3 ee ; bay sorte Be » Sagal *e 
oe: ad ae es % al wee 4 ee oe | *M 3 \ BY 
ie is ee @ xs ae sl a te Fs Les : rs ? rs a 
8 DPE ee aS fg 
Whe Sok, » Poem HS: ae . She Kh 
hee Sane ty hd ' &. ete ae . y ters -_ 
Dee be eet = of se aot ' es 8: 
ts * Gis ~_ FF t, is Sot 4 ef 
7 % A © B - . a \w j e : } 
SVEN WN SY fe a An | 
4 DE w\y Pa’ ’ ae 
Qe cOnn, ={=———— ; | 
| ye Oe ee i 
; 
4 
=. LD ee eee | 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


71 


THE GROWING IMPORTANCE 
OF THE COLORED FAIR 


Officials Rapidly Awakening to Its Possibilities 


By JAMES A. JACKSON 


“ . ,. Twenty thousand people passed 
the gate Thursday. . . . Farm, school and 
Negro manufacturers’ exhibits better than 
ever, . . +” The foregoing is an extract 
from a report on the North Carolina Negro 
fair at Raleigh, last October. 

« . , , Sixteen thousand admissions on 
the big day. . - . ! This fair represents 
the maximum co-operation between the races,’’ 
says City Commissioner Dun'op. They (Negro 
fair visitors) spent about $40,000 in the city 
during the week’? says the editor of a Lexing- 
ton, Ky., daily newspaper. 

The foregoing paragraphs are extracts from 
reports sent to The Billboard by the writer con- 
cerning the colored fairs at the two cities 
mentioned. They are significant because they 
are typical of the findings with regard to a 
pumber visited all the way from Philadelphia, 
Pa., to Florida, and because they indicate the 
growing importance of these institutions to a 
constantly increasing number of people. With 
the exception of a few astute showmen, few 
know or have appreciated the opportunities 
presented by these associations, 

Forty-six colored State, county and com- 
munity fairs have come to tbe writers’ no- 
tice. There is reason to believe that nearly 
as many more are scattered thru the Southern 
States. So far each of these organizations has 
led a sort of independent existence, Very 
often they were a kind of “Jim Crow” an- 
aftermath to the regular State or 


In most instances, attractions were booked 
from any traveling agent who may have sought 
the date for bis show. The fair officials gave 
little consideration to the adaptability of the 
offered attraction to their particular require- 
ments. In fact the lack of proper connec- 
tions and facilities permitted little latitude in 
this matter. 

The concession workers were euch as hap- 
pened along. This haphazard booking per- 
mitted many of comparatively low standard, 
ofttimes failing shows, to ‘‘get out of the bar- 
tel’ at the expense of the colored fair visitors 
who, to be frank, got little for their money. 
The colored fair proved to be the salvation of 
several carnival companies during the sum- 
mer and fall of 1921. Let it be understood 
that not all the attractions that played these 
fairs were in the category of derelicts. Some 
were of the best on the road, and they profited 
according!y. 

Because of the absence of expert advice, 
the advertising was often poorly placed, or not 
placed at all, except by word of mouth. What 
publicity was obtained was entirely too local in 
its distribution. Excepting Lexington, Ky., 
few of the associations availed themselves of 
the “Homing” instinct of the native sons and 
daughters, or of the sporting inclinations of 
their people. These attributes prompt a ready 
and profitable response to advertising in dis- 
tant cities. Lexington placed its paper as 
far away as Chicago to excellent advantage. 

Few fair officials had any knowledge of 
similar activities elsewhere. Virtually none 
knew of the attractions booked at other fairs 
of the kind. None had a really extensive 
knowledge of the many Negro exhibitors and 
attractions that might be secured, yet these 
Were the very things for which their patronage 
clamored, Some were even unaware of the 
Services that were at their disposal in the 
columns of The Billboard. Dates of nearby 
fairs often conflicted to the detriment of both. 

In spite of themselves they succeeded. Each 
fair in its own handicapped manner has been 
slowly creating for itself a place of conse- 
quence in its community and neighborhood. 
Most of them have about reached the limit 


of individual possibilities, while yet far short 
of their maximum degree of usefulness to their 
race, the community, or to the amusement 
world, This fact has become very evident to 
the more progressive fair executives, among 
them many of whom quite freely discussed 
their troubles with the writer, 

The soldier and labor movements of nearly 
a million Negros during the war has been an 
awakening influence. Race publications, Negro 
motion pictures and other channels of educa- 
tion have contributed to the very pronounced 
development of race consciousness, with the 
result that the visitors to these fairs are de- 
manding that they be ‘‘Negro’’ in more than 
mere name, Then, too, these visitors are won- 
dering why so many exhibits that were on 
view at the more general fairs cannot be 
found at theirs. They are frequently dis- 
appointed at not finding demonstrated some 
certain commodity of which they have read or 
heard, at the only fair affording them free 
rein to an unrestrained curiosity. 


The following questions just about sum- 
marize the efforts of officials of a dozen fairs 
in four different States to meet these demands: 

How may we increase the educational value 
of our fair? 

How may we secure more colored amuse- 
ments and attractions? 

How can we obtain advertising matter por- 
traying Negro characters? 

How may we obtain a greater diversity of 
exhibits of Negro origin? 

How may we attract exhibits of nationally 
advertised farm appliances and domestic equip- 
ment? 

In the solution of these problems seems to 
rest the future usefulness of the colored fair. 
Usefulness will determine the degree of suc- 
cess and will encourage the establishment of 
still more of the type. They are in reality 
pioneers in an immense field of social and eco- 
nomic service, 

On the whole the answer to these questions 
is an ASSOCIATION OF COLORED FAIR OF- 
FICIALS, an organization that was suggested 
by this publication at the close of the fair 
season just passed. Such an organization 
would provide an entity of sufficient size to 
command the respectful attention of both ex- 
hibitors and amusement purveyors, An al- 
liance with the National Negro Business Men's 
League, as a subsidiary body, would be effective 
in placing every fair member in direct con- 
tact with the entire business fabric of the 
race. 

Neither the colored press nor the papers 
of more general circulation could afford to 
ignore a collection of officials representing the 
purchasing possibilities of two or three mil- 
lion people, no matter what the race may be. 

Such an association could protect its meme 
bers againet the irresponsible promoter and to 
a great extent obviate conflicting dates. 

In detail, the answer to the first query is 
continuous co-operation with the U, S, Bureau 
of Extension Work, in the Department of Agri- 
culture, thru local and State representatives; 
careful scanning of the Iyceum and chautau- 
qua field for the better entertainers of the 
race; and the extending of invitations to such 
active educational societies as the N. A. A. 
Cc. P. and kindred bodies. 

The second question has been tentatively 


and widest-known amusement m of the 
ce. 
He has offered to produce a Carn&al-Circus 


to cost approximately $90,000, and inc&yde two 
or more rides, two free acts, at lIe&st six 
shows, and more than thirty conce sions, 
provided not less than ten fairs will co tract 
dates to the attraction he produces. He,will 
specialize on Negro talent. That the ,thient 
is available for such a production is evident 
from a survey of the activities of the darker 
group in the outdoor amusement field as a 
whole. 

The extent of Negro experience and activity 
in the show business is now being measured 
with some degree of accuracy. Last season 
Negroes owned and independently operated five 
different attractions under canvas. Seven more 
such organizations, owned by white people, 
were composed of Negro performers, Five col- 
ored doctors were known to have had their 
own shows on the road. Fifteen of the race 
having concession privileges with carnival com- 
panies were encountered by the writer on the 
road. Over fifty more were employed by con- 
cessionaires of the other race, 


Negro bands have long been attractions with 
circus side-shows. It is a distinct pleasure to 
learn now that cur artists have invaded the 
“big-top’’—a much longed for achievement. 
Coy Herndon, the hoop-roller, once with Howe’s 
Great London Show, and Allie Johnson, a wire- 
walker, will be featured with the Patterson 
Trained Animal Show. Thus they become to 
the circus world what Bert Williams and 
Charles Gilpin are, respectively, to musical 
comedy and the drama in the under-roof places 
of entertainment. 


The writer has definite knowledge of at 
least twenty-eight) other acts adaptable to 
circus and carnival use. The list includes one 
male and one female aviator, acrobats, aerial- 
ists, bicycle riders, calliope players, contor- 
tionists, jugglers, magicians, leapers, animal 
trainers and a horse exhibitor. 

The lots boast of some very excellent musi- 
cal organizations. The P. G, Lowery Band 
with the Barnum-Ringling Bros.’ Show is 
a@ conceded leader, when merit alone is re- 
garded. The late James Wolfscale, whose 
death is one of the regrets of the year, al- 
ways had a good band under his guidance. 
Another of that class was the Ed. Farrel Band 
on the Al. Barnes Show last season. R, N. 
Jackson had a crackerjack-band with the Hag- 
enback-Wallace Shew, and Jerry Martin kept 
together a rice group of musicians with the 
Walter L. Main Show. The Rhoda Royal 
Show had the Old Kentucky Band and Min- 
strel. 

With the Al Barnes Show last season six 
Negro comics shared honors with the other 
group of ‘“‘Jerrys’’ in securing laughs with 
their antics. 

A selection from among the different acts 
and bands mentioned, or a duplication of them, 
along with the abilities of such bona fide 
showmen as Gordon Bunch, W. A. Barclay, 
Alphonso, Roy Craddock, J. H. Dixon, Shell 
Paris and Oscar Jenkins, all trained in the 
big competitive field where no favors are 
shown, assures a bunch of materia) from which 
one of Mr, Dudley's experiencé may readily 
assemble an organization that would compare 
favorably with any in the game. 

The concert band has been a much overlooked 
attraction for these fairs. In this department 
are some colored organizations of real merit. 
All of Nebraska and some citizens of adjoin- 
ing States praise the Dan DesDunes Regimental 
Band of Omaha. It has become a standard at- 
traction at the big State fair and at a num- 
ber of other gatherings in the Stae. 

The Fifteenth Regiment Band, of the New 
York Guard, once under the direction of 
Lieutenant Fred Simpson, but since the new 
year directed by Lieutenant Wm. Vodery, has 


TALL ACTS, COMPANIES AND THEATER 


Tr. O. 


442-3-4 Volunteer State Life Bldg., 


CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 


MANAGERS COMMUNICATE WITH THE 


B. A. 


SAM E REEVIN, Manager | 


—_—— 


acquired an immense scrap-book of clippings 
from metropolitan daily papers. 

Prof, J. Lewis Peters and the eighty-piece 
Williams Lodge Band of Richmond, Va.; Blue 
and his famous Shrine Band of St. Louis, Mo., 
and the Excelsior Band of Norfolk, Va., are 
all high class musical organizations. 


In Louisville, Ky., there is a boys’ band at 
the Booker T. Washington Community Center 
that earned a lot of highly complimentary 
press comment at Kentucky fairs and Missouri 
couventions last year. The Eighth Regiment 
Band of the Illinois National Guard is con- 
sidered one of the standard parade and concert 
organizations of the country. 

The Fraternity Band of Cincinnati and the 
Robert Odgen Band of Wanamaker's store, 
Philadelphia, have reputations that are real 
drawing values. 

The question regarding advertising paper and 
lithographs that will enable these fairs to 
broadcast matter bearing pictoral characters 
typifying the race, has been answered by the 
announcement of the Donaldson Lithographing 
Company of two new lines of production for 
this specific purpose. The forehandedness of 
this enterprising concern in so speedily recog- 
nizing this need is deserving of the patronage 
that will justify the hazard. 

The closing questions may both be answered 
with one word, PUBLICITY—publicity that be- 
gins long before each fair and continues long 
after, so that the dates and the commercial 
Possibilities are both impressed upon the pro- 
motion departments of exbibitors to the end 
that the fair finds itself included when the 
season’s program is under consideration, no 
matter when the subject is handled by those 
concerned. 

Business houses that utilize the fairs to in- 
troduce their wares keep posted thrn trade 
journals and amusement publications, THE 
BILLBOARD being the principal source of in- 
formation on these matters. Many copies of 
this very issue will be filed for reference and 
subsequent issues will be carefully scanned 
for further information. 

A number of Negro concerns are aggressively 
seeking such avenues as these fairs afford for 
the introduction of their different products to 
a market they quite naturally wish to culti- 
vate—one that is very properly theirs for the 
cultivation. Some jobbers and manufacturers 


have appealed to The Billboard, and _ still 
others to the Associated Negro Press. The 
Defender and other race papers have been 


studied, at times in vain, to learn of these 
fairs before they occur. The Berry & Rosg 
Doll Co, was one of the several. 


A fair must be twice sold, once to exhibl- 
tors and again to the public, Straight ad 
vertising and the distribution of legitimate 
publicity are both essential to the accomplish: 
ment of the desired objectives. 

Publicity expenditures will prove to be the 
most profitable investment of the whole budget 
when the day of reckoning comes after the 
year’s fair is over. The improvement of the 
colored fair so that it is increasingly interest. 
ing to its visitors each year means much more 
than mere profit, and will include that. It 
means better understanding between the races; 
a knowledge of better things to the members 
of the race; better equipment in homes and 
on farms. It contributes to comfort and there- 
fore is better citizenship. 

To the community improvement means great- 
er expenditures with local merchants, both dur 
ing and after the fair. 

To the exhibitor of either race it means a 
hitherto almost unexploited purchasing power. 
If encouraged, the Negro fair will, by organiza- 
tion, relieve itself of current handicaps and 
prove an asset of real value to any community 
fostering one, 

The employment of Negro talent in these 
enterprises will invest them with naturalness 
and a completeness now lacking. It will also 
operate to relieve the general field of just that 
many artists seeking employment and to that 
measure leave openings elsewhere for others. 

At the same time the art‘sts will be placed 
where they will in all likelihood achieve both 
more praise and more profit for their talent. 


Amanzie Richardson, wire walker, ison the 
Southern end of the T. O. B. A. 


THE EDUCATIONAL FEATURE YOU WANT 


REEL NEGRO NEWS 


The Newiest News Reel Released With 


Elizabeth Mitchell’s Camera-Trips 
Produced By 


LEIGH WHIPPER FILMS, 2305 7th Ave., 


New York City 


BERR RRR Me LL lel states 


grain 


pe bene ees AR ia Be 


a ee = 
answered by Sherman H. Dudley, 1823 Seventh ‘Ea 
st., N. W., Washington, D. C., thé§ wealthiest ee 
‘ 
_-_O C—O Hee y 
er 
a ; | 
i | 
boa hee 
Po | | 
' set 
| 
Ni 
| 
: 
| 
: 
ie | 
; 
; | 
county fair. F 
} 
Lis 
} 
? 
Sl 
i 
li 
: 
% \ 
| 
ee ty 
nae, 
rrr cee ee LE LL LL TD 
TTT ITT ITT ITT T ITT Ti iii LL Tl leslaellesleteaveleteandssheliataseteettaheaeessdsibeseaes 4 i} 
2 Tel 
am me rg 9 : 
: ee 
J e ) 
« - © 
La a ‘y 
b a i 
a a i 
= w ig -, 
= ee = 
= s | 
a J bal | : 
" = Pi FP | 
= = Hi : 
& Ee aaa i . | 
2 = oo 
® a Bit. 
= —e | | . 
had i 
“a i? - 


72 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


LEIGH WHIPPER EXPANDING 


When the ‘“‘Reel Negro News,”’ contracted 
for a two-day opening engagement at the 
Lincoln Theater, Washington, D. C., was re- 
tained for the week, and Manager Byars of 
that hvuse engeged subsequent releases to 
run day and date with a duplicate running for 
Mr. Pinchback at the Republic, showfolks sat 
up and began to notice this remarkable achieve- 
ment. 

Within 48 hours Mr. Whipper had contracts 
with N. D. Brascher, of the Associated 
Negro Press, to provide an added feature to 
be called the K. K. K., meaning Komic Kolored 
Klippings, these to be selected by the A. N. P. 
and credited to the Negro publication in which 
the selected clipping originated. 

He had interested Mr. Mitchell, a banker 
of Charleston, W. Va., and some associated in- 
vestors in the capital city who promptly ar- 
ranged to incorporate the ‘‘Leich Whipper 
Films’ to take over the News and provide 
capital for producing ‘‘The Come-Back,”’ a fea- 
ture starring Kid Nolan, the pugilist, with 
Ellen Ray, Louise Fuller, Ethel Watson and 
Victor Price. 

The new concern is capitalized 
with no stock for sale. Contracts have been 
closed with Tiffany Tolliver of Roanoke for 
distribution in Virginia, West Virginia and North 
Carolina. The Muscle Shoals Distributing Com- 
pany will have the Georgia, Florida, Alabama, 
Louisiana, Texas and Oklahoma district. 

Negotiations are pending with John Wade 
apd the Enterprise Company of Phi'adelphia 
for the handling of the Eastern territory. 

Specia! arrangements have been made for the 
covering of the National Negro Press Associa- 
tion annual meeting and the unveiling of the 
Booker T. Washington Monument at Tuskegee 
on April 5. 


LEXINGTON DATE ANNOUNCED 

The Texingtot. (Ky.) Colored Fair announces 
the date this year to be the week of August 
7. J. G. Saunders is again president. Walter 
Searcy, vice-president; L. W. Johnson, treas- 
urer; J. L. Hathaway, secretary, and directors, 
J. L. Bean, A. H. Stevenson, C. H. Smith and 
J. D. Keene. 

Sanctioned races will be run every day and 
the exhibits this year, according to promise, 
will be a big improvement on the remarkable 
showing of ‘ast year. 

They are committed to the use of colored 
“ttractions where it is possible to secure such 
as are up to the required standard. 


MODERN COCKTAIL 


at $25,000 


Endorses Some Stopping Places 


Peoria, 111.—Givens Hotel, 

Davenport, Ia.—Mrs. Gresh, 112 Gaines 
street. 

Chicago, 111.—Vincennes Hotel, 

Chicago, I11.—Columbia Hotel. 

Milwaukee, Wis.—Mrs. J. Sorrell, 501 Galena 
street 

South Bend, Ind.—Mre. 0. ©. Haynes, 117% 
Michigan street. (Wonderful place.) 

Terre Haute, Ind.—Mrs. George Garrett, 628 
South Second street. (Wonderful place.) 


HORSE SHOW AND FAIR 


(Great.) 


George D. Carey is secretary of the 
Winchester Colored Horse Show and Race Meet, 
Winchester, Va. From reports that have come 
to the Page concerning this meet it is one ef 
the best dates in the State, and in the bands 
of progressive officials, 


Look thru the Letter List in this {ssve. 


REOL PRODUCTIONS 
CORPORATION 


ROBERT LEVY. President. °. 


Producers o 
HIGH-GR4ADE FEATURE PICTURES, 
With Colored Artists. 
For information address 
— REOL PRODUCTIONS CORP., 
1 . 46th Street. New York City: 618 Film Birch, 
Bide.. Clevelend. 0.: 111 Walton St., Atlanta, Ga. 


WANTED FOR MY 
MEDICINE SHOW 


Colored Tuba Player, Trap Drummer 
that can sing Ballads. Ed. Tolliver, 
wire. Open April 17th near Chicago. 

HARRY E. DALY, 
3252 Wallace St., 


Accommodation May Be Had at Special Rates. 
THE ROYAL PALACE HOTEL. 
Baltimore’s Newest and Cosiest Little Hostelry 68 
Pennsy'van a Avenue, Baltimore, Md. C. H JONES, 
ao : JENNIE C. JONES Mer. Phones 8692-3 and 


Lincoln Motion Picture Co. 


Chicago. 


Bat. 1916. Capitalized §75.000. Oldest Film Coe- 
poration in the World cing Necro P’ 1% 
121 CENTRAL AVE.. - LOS ANGELES, 


DUNBAR THEATRE STANDARD THEATRE 
Gibson Bldg. astern General T. O. B. A. Circuit. 
JOHN T. GIBSON, Sole Owner and Managing Di- 
rector, 1200 th St. hiladelphia, Pa. 


COLORED BANDS WANTED 


FOR 


—— 


MEDICINE SHOWS 


CAN USE two more Colored Bands, 5 or 6 pieces, all brass, with drums. 


Shows open March 14th, close Xmas. 


All in first telegram or letter. 


THE A. G. PAYNE LABORATORY, Lexington, Ky. 


ROBINSON’S SIDE-SHOW BAND 


Ready To Jazz ’Em Up for Season 1922 


Following is the roster of Neal McClarin’s 
“Jazz ‘Em Up” Band, which will be with 
the John Robinson Circus this season: Neal Mc- 
Claris, cornet and leader; Vernon Young, cor- 
net; J. B. Blackwell, clarinet; William How- 
ard, cornet; Ike Sanders, trombone; Robert 
Owens, trombone and comedian; Joe Allen, 
baritone and comedian; Clinton High, alto and 
comedian; Ben Christian, bass; George Owens, 
“alto and comedian; John King, alto in band, 
trap drum in orchestra; James King, snare drum 
and comedian. Arthur Wollege, “‘The Original 
Rags,”” is featured. 

The featured part of their programs wil) con- 
sist of “Early Morning Blues,’’ “Somebody's 
Got My Man," “Night Time on the Mason and 
Dixon Line,’’ “I've Got Enough of Those Dog- 
gone Fiying Machines,” ‘Midnight Get-By 
Blues,” ‘“‘Maravan’’ and all of H. ©. Davis’ 
trombone marches, “Oh Slip It Man,” “Mr. 
Trombonology,”’ ‘*‘Master Trombone,” “Miss 
Trombonism,” ‘‘Trombone Francias,”’ 

This organization is being rehearsed every 
week at the Traveling Conservatory of Music, 
410 Fifth avenue, Nashville, Tenn, 


A REAL EXHIBITOR 


The West Indies Cigar Company, of Durham, 
N. C., last year placed a complete factory on 
the grounds of the Colored State Fair at 
Raleigh, N. C., and was so pleased with the 
results derived from the expensive display of 
factory methods that it contemplates going 
to all of the fairs that will provide their dates 
in time to be included in the schedule. 

Lieutenant C. C. Valle, general manager of 
the all-Negro enterprise, was in New York dur- 
ing February and called at The Billboard in 
the hope that information concerning these 
dates could be supplied. Due to neglect of 
fair officials themselves, we were able to pro- 
vide but three dates and the promise of more 
es we obtain them, 

J. J. Pearson is president, F. K. Watkins, 
the theater owner, is vice-presideni; R. M. 
Andrews, counsel, and C. E. Winslow, secretary. 
The company is in the general market and 
placing its product all over the country. 


SILAS GREEN READY 


On March 15 Charles Collier will move out 
of Macon, Ga., with the old Southern institu- 
tion, the Silas Green Show, that made a for- 
tune for the late Eph. Williams. 

Ada Lockhart Booker is again in charge of 
the stage. This hard-working lady has pulled 
a clever bit of business. During the rehearsal 
period she played the principals of the show 
under the title of the ‘‘Nonpari.u Players’’ at 
the Doug!as Theater in Macon, In this group 
were Mildred Scott, Bobby Ridley, Edna Tay- 
lor, Doll Gray, Henrietta Lane, Bobby Johnson, 
Mary Simmons, May Edwards and Ada Chap- 
man, The men were Harry Gray, Stack Cald- 
well, Willie Edwards and Stack Kimball. 

Lawrenee Booker will have practically all 
of the old band members on the show again. 
Those who reported early served to augment 
the orchestra at the Douglas for three weeks. 

Mr. Collier has had the company car done 
over, a new kitchen and hallway built in, and 
a Delco light plant installed. 


RALEIGH FAIR 


The Raleigh Colored Fair has been set for 
October 23. Dr. Jobn G. Love is the secretary 
of the organization. He is the man who first 
espoused the cause of a Negro Fair official or- 
ganization, From reports he is expected to de- 
velop an unusually good fair this year; one 
that is making special effort to interest Negro 
commercial exhibitors. He is also trying to 
better the tone of the attractions offered as 
amusements in North Carolina colored fairs. 


GREENVILLE (S. C.) NOTES 

Bud Dewey and wife have signed to handle 
the H. L. Benson Georgia Minstrels. The show 
will number twenty people incleding a band 
of ten pieces. 

Si Elliott will direct the band on the J. F. 
Murphy Shows and his organization is being 
assembled at winter quarters here. 


COLORED FAIR IMPROVEMENTS 
(Continued from page 70) 

to in Pennsylvania one season was two weeks 

in a colored section of Philadelphia. Now, I 

could say ten times more about the same, but 

what is the use? 


HERE AND THERE AMONG OUTDOOR FOLKS 


“Bil” Pickett, of the 10% Ranch, is one 
of the features in the Norman Film Company, 
colored Western film, in which Anita Bush 
stars. 

G. Sharper White will hit the trail with the 
Melton Minstrels this summer. The show opens 
at Danville, Ky. He and his teammate are 
doing an act called “The Misunderstanding.” 

Prof. T. E. White will have the band on the 
Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus and has already 
booked an excellent group of talented musi- 
cians. James A. Peters, who played baritone 
last season, is back with the show. He is at 
3525 Hastings street, Detroit, pending the 
opening date. 

Webb and Webb (John and Henrietta) have 
contracted with the Morris & Castle Minstrels 
for the coming season. Meanwhile they are 
at 110 West Coleville street, McMinnville, Tenn, 
Pete Thompson will manage the show. 

Prince Askazuma is at 14 Coristo etreet, 
San Juan, Porto Rico. He says that he can 
hear the bluebirds the year round. 

Wells and Wells, comedy acrobats and tra- 
peze artists, close on the International Circuit 
March 18. This man and weman, working as 
Indians or Porto Ricans, are a neat team. 


Joe Miller, the little man w'th the big horn, 
has closed with the “Florida Blossoms’’ Com- 
pany and is at his home in Talladega, Ala. 


Billy Arnte is getting a company together 
at 529 Avondale avenue, Toledo, 0., to go 
out April 1 under the management of James 
O'Brien. 

Elsie Norris, who has been in the East for 
the past season, is now cashier and private 
secretary to W. A. Johnson, manager of the 
Grand Theater, Chicago. This lady enjoys the 
distinction of having been the only colored 
woman to have had jurisdiction over the ticket 
box in a Broadway theater. She was treasurer 
of the “Put and Take” show at Town Hall, 
New York. She is an asset to any amnee- 
ment business office, because of her pleasing 


personality and efficiency, 
Beware of Baltimore for the time being. 
Tab. companies are scattered all oved the 


city bidding for openings. The prevailing offer 
is percentage, with the company on the short 
end of 60-40. 


Abrupt cancelationg due, a, banded, bes show ana‘l#in New York, 


underbidding have placed a number of actors 
in distress in that town lately. 

Andrew Tribble with Alex Lovejoy and Dink 
Stewart are replacing the dramatic stock in 
the new Douglass, BaJtimore, on March 13. 

Joe Bright's methods got him into trouble 
in Baltimore—and his usual cleverness enabled 
him to get right out. 

Chas. Moore, the dean of our dramatic actors, 
when he jumped into Chicago to open the Grand 
March 8, was the victim of a holdup en route 
from the station. A blow on the head has 
placed him in bed for a time. 

Ida Anderson, with Lawrence Chenault, opened 
at the Standard, Philadelphia, with a dramatic 
tab, company March 6, 

Gilpin has had his weekly banquet. This 
time it was the N. A. A. C. P. at Reading, 
Pa., February 25. We have lost the score. 

Mr. Rawlinson, of Rawlinson and Williams, 
has been confined to the Harlem Hospital, New 
York. The act is booked by Chas. Freeman. 

Gladyce Brown has secured a United Time 
showing for the Lee and Vandyke act. 

Brown and _ Sorrell’s ‘Morning Glories’ 
played the Goldfield, first half March 13, after 
splitting the week previous between Towshend 
and Bel Air, Md. 

Reynolds and Jones, Washington and Warh- 
ington, the Nelson Trio and the Lincoln piec- 
ure, “By Right of Birth,”’ was the bill that 
the Page visited in Baltimore on March 7 at 
the Lincoln Theater. 

J. Raymond Wallace, of the team of Wal'ace 
and Wallace, has retired from the stage and 
is now special officer at the Lincoln Theater, 
Baltimore. 

Happy Ferguson has resigned as stage raan- 
ager at the Booker T. Washington Theater In 


Texarkana and he and Jenneta Rice are back 
on the T. 0. B. A. in the Ok'ahoma houses. 

Leon Diggs is at the Hernandez Cabar>t in 
New Orleans, having closed with the Edgar 
Martin “‘Joyland Girls.” 


S. H. Gray and Virginia Liston, with their 
new act, “The Night Watchman in the Light 
House,” with special scenery, were in Newport, 
Va., March 6, for the week and are due in 
New York about the last week of the month, 

Ollie Burgoyne, the Oriental dancer, has dis- 


THE FIGURES 
That Tell Why Our Fai 
MY Dine aire are Worth 


The following statistics, official 
the U. S. Bureau, tell zane ww 


an amaz 
of commercial possibilities. = a, 

There are 925,708 Negro farmers in the 
United States; 218,612 of thes- own their 
farms, and 705,070 are tenant farmers, while 
2,026 manage the estates of others, 

These people own and operate 41,432,182 
acres of farm land having an aggregate value 
of $2,257,000,000. The annual crop value is 
left to fate and the imagination, there being no 
doubt that it is enormous, 

The Negro fairs listed with The Billboard 
(by no means are they all listed yet) are 
located in fifteen States in which the greater 
part of this Negro wealth is situated. In fact 
eighty-six per cent of the agricultural wealth 
of the Negro ts scattered thru these States. 

This fact coupled with the knowledge that 
as a rule colored farmers stand greatly in 
need of better equipment and education in its 
use, gives to these fairs an especial signifcance 
to exhibitors. 

The known tendency of the race to indulge 
in amusements gives to their fairs ever greater 
importance in the eyes of amusement vendors. 


BALTIMORE HAS CONCERT 


The Aeolian Choral Society of Baltimore pre- 
sented the following program under the 4di- 
rection of Lieutenant Jack Thomas on Febro- 
ary 27. Besides being a retired bandmaster 
of the U. S. army Mr. Thomas is a graduate 
of the Institute of Musical Art in New York 
and has studied under Walter Damrosch and 
Arthor Clappe of Knellar Hall, England. 

1, March—‘Sambre et Meuse’—A. Torict. 
(French National Defile.) 

Coronation—“‘With Courage and Faith’~— 
Meyebeer. March—(from the Prophet) 
By Entire Ensemble. 

Overture—‘‘William Tell’’...........Rossini 
(Played by request.) By the Band. 

4. Two Spirituals: (a) Trio: “Didn't It Rain” 
—Tourner. (b) Quartet: “‘I’s Gwine To 
Sing in de Heavenly Choir’’—Milligan. 
By the Ladies. 

Waltz—‘‘Impassioned Dreams”’—J. Rosas. 
By the Band. 

Two Excerpts: (a) “Anvil Chorus” from D 
Trovatore—Verdi. (b) “Stabat Mater” 
from Infammatus—Rosinni. (Obtigato 
sung by Mrs. Goldie Brown.) By en- 
tire ensemble. 

Three Spirituals: (a) “‘TAsten to the Lambs” 
—R. N. Dett. (b) “Dig My Grave”—H. 
T. Burleigh. (c) “Deep River’—H. T. 
Burleigh. By Chorus. 

Selection “Lucia @1  #Lammermoor”— 
Donizetti. By the Band. Entree of 
Chorus at the Sextet. 

Finale—March—“Sons of Liberty’’—A. Jack 
Thomas. This number was written by 
Mr. Thomas on the U. S. Transport 
George Washington while crossing the 
Atlantic Ocean en route to France during 
the late war and dedicated to the 92n4 
Division (colored soldiers). It is run- 
sing in its second edition in Paris, 
France, where it is published by the firm 
of BE. Gaudet. Played for the first time 
in America at this concert. 


AUTUMN FAIR IN COURTS 


Philadelphia, Pa., March 10.—The further 
hearings in the case against Charles H. 
Brooks, prominent Philadelphian, charged with 
embezzlement of funds of the Philadelphia 
Autumn Fair Association, set for Wednesday, 
March 15, before Magistrate Beaton, have been 
continued until Wednesday, the 23rd. It is 
said that efforts are being made to have the 
whole affair settled out of court. In this con- 


. 


nection it is claimed that one of the most 


Prominent prosecutors is willing to withdraw 
the charge for the purpose of effecting a set- 
tlement outside of court. On the other hand, 
others claim they will even take their case to 
another magistrate. 


WARFIELD’S MOTHER ILL 

Robert Warfield, of the team of Simms and 
Warfield, was called to the bedside of his 
mother at 4350 Champlain ave., Chicago, 
March 1. Her serious illness obliged the act 
to lay off a long series of Orpheum, Jr., coD- 
tracts. 

Joe Simms did the last half of the week #6 
a single at the Koppin, in Detroit, after which 
he went home to await his partner’s return to 
work, 


IN REALART PRODUCTION 
Geo. Reed, one of the best-known colored 
Olm character actors on the Coast, appears oD 
the screen as “Sam,” the faithful servant {ip 
the Realart-Paramount production, “‘A Virginia 
Courtship,” featuring May McAvoy, Mr. Reed 
will be remembered as the Doctor in the Lin- 
coln film, “Realization,” and as the colored 
actor who played with Antonio Moreno in the 
Vitagraph serial, “The.,\Vellea Mystery.” 
% @fbr j 


td 
; = ee a 
| es = 
ee 
erm 
| SCS ee 
. ee 
pb 
' eC“: 
i é = baste 
eC 
iis a 
| — ee 
» 
ee QO " sities 7 | 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


73 


fy 
Vf Glee 
* yyy 


YY Y fy 7 Uff 


EDITED AT THE CINCINNATI OFFICES OF THE BILLBOARD 


WHERE LETTERS AND NEWS ITEMS WILL BE GRATEFULLY RECEIVED~ 


WHAT MAKES FOR 
MAGIC POPULARITY? 


By WILLIAM W. DURBIN 


Is magie dead? Will magic ever die? This 
is best answered by describing what magic 
is. Magic is mystery, and mystery began 
with the creation and will continue until time 
is no more. The human mind craves mystery. 
That is why magic is so popular. From an 
art that in olden times was confined to the 
few who were associated in the minds of the 
people with the Evil One, it has gradually 
evolved into a scientific art with thousands of 
followers who are interested professionally and 
otherwise. Its literature now runs into the 
hundreds of volumes upon all branches of the 
subject. This is natural, because all forces 
in nature are used in magic. We have the 
magic of mechancis, optics, chemistry, mathe- 
matics, electricity, magnetism, galvanism, 
acoustics and so forth in addition to pure 
sleight-of-hand. Almost every public library 
bas some work on magic, so that the young 
minds are delving into its mysteries and en- 
gaging in its practice, thus stimulating inter- 
est in the art. Hundreds of magicians today 
first became interested in magic thru reading 
some book of the art. David Devant, Eng- 
land's greatest magician, started in this way. 

In addition to this there are more publica- 
tions devoted entirely to the art of magic’ han 
ever before and they circulate in every country 
under the sun, spreading new ideas which are 
elevating the art everywhere. Almost every 
large city has its Society of Magicians, in addi- 
tion to which there are national and interna- 
tional societies whose combined memberships 
tun into the thousands. There are more and 
better manufacturers of magical apparatus and 
ilicsions in the world mow than ever. All these 
things boost the art. New tricks and illusions 
are being invented, old ones trimmed up so 
that you do not recognize them in their new 
dress, and thus the world of magic keeps pace 
with the times. There is no end to what magi- 
clans can and will do, because magic, like a 
kaleidoscope, can be turned around and around, 
each time making a new figure; and so magic, 
calling to its aid the latest discoveries in 
science and art, is able to accomplish most 
wonderful things. 

Why then is the claim made that people are 
tired of magic? It is simply because of the 
mode of presentation. There are too many 
artists who, instead of working out an original 
Program, copy the program of some other 
artist. This is wholly unnecessary, because, 
with a thousand and one tricks and illusions 
to select from, it only requires careful study 
to work out a pleasing and harmonious pro- 
gram. Too many of our artists are prone to 
use the other fellow’s program, just like some 
editors use their shears and paste pot more 
than their brains. A magical performance to 
be remembered must be presented properly and 
here again we find many artists never coming 
into the audience at all, creating the !mpres- 
sion in the minds of the avdience that all 
Properties used are ‘“‘fixed."’ This has been 
brought about notably among our vandeville 
artists by the fact that they are only allowed 
a few minutes to present their act. Tersonal 
contact with the audience is necessary for the 
Proper effect, The use of borrowed rings, 
Watches, gloves, handkerchiefs, coins, etc., 
adds greatly to the effect of an entertainment 
and this will never be forgotten. Then, again, 
a little exp'anation always helps an audience 
to see just what you are doing and what you 
Propose to do. In a magic show where there 
is no explanation, but simply a biff, bum, 
bang, a box opened here and another opened 
there, and everything done so fast that one 
what is being done, is it any 
wonder that people go away without any con- 
ception of what was done? How long will 
such a show be remembered? 1 remember the 
old Kellar show back in 1886, and I can recall 
practically every experiment he performed, 
from beginning to end, because it was ac- 


cannot see 


“ . 

How To Answer Questions In Crysta! Gazing” 
The only book of its kind, You should have it, $1.00. 
Psychic Card Trick. nock ‘em cold; pe of i 
25e. 4 Volumes sphinx, 1918 to 1921. $7.50; of 
Magical Butte, $5.00." Hindu Costume 3 sale, 

end 2c st for big bargain list. GEO. 
LAW RENCE. "065 Hutchinson St., Chicago, M1. 


by Okito (Theo. 


QUALITY MAGIC, BRambere), one of 


the best books for‘ magicians ever published, is now 
rea 24 fine effects, profusely illustrated. Price, 


Bessie 1421 University Ave., New York. 


HYPNOTISTS, pe enemy Book La 
lished. to sell di to Protenonats performance. Big 


Profits. 
8 
PEVENADA. 9 sy No trash. 1AvUIS 


companied by explanation sufficient to fix it in 
my mind. A'exander Herrmann always did the 
Same, so did Hartz, Powell and many others 
I could name. In those days there was not 
the sameness of programs, for Kellar’s was 
different from MHerrmann’s, and Hartz's and 
Powell’s were different from others. One of 
the things that makes managers tire of 
magical performances js the sameness that 
runs thru many of the programs. You can't 
blame them if it is the same old billiard ball 
stunt, the thimbles, three white handkerchiefs 
thru a tube, the production of a flag, bowls of 
rice and water, and finally the everlasting 
“Sawing Thru a Woman,"’ which most every 
artist js putting on now. Even if an artist has 
to put in something that others have, can’t 
he have a little originality and present it in 
a different way? 

One thing magicians should study jn their 
Program is continuity so that you go naturally 
from one experiment to another. Like a good 
dinner in which the best comes last, so the 
best illusion should be saved for the finish, 
thus permitting the people to go away with 
a fine impression of the show. Several years 
ago I witnessed the performance of a chautau- 
qua entertainer who commenced with a very 
good experiment and ran along to the middle, 
when he produced a lot of animals, which was 
very fine. Then he dwindled down so that 
at the end he performed with the thimbles. 
You can imagine just what such a program did, 
Every magician must realize that you get 
about as much out of magic as you put into 
it. If you put in nothing, you draw out 
nothing. In this day and age, when people are 
becoming wiser every day, it is necessary te 
keep apace with the times, and magical per- 
formances must be up to date. The tricks 
which our grandfathers saw wil! not do for 
the boys and girls of today, much less the 
older people. A program must be varied so 


that It appeals to Tom, Dick and Harry. There 
must be something for the children, sumething 
for those who always want to see a rabbit or 
guinea pig produced, then something of the 
uncanny in mindreading, spiritualism and so 
on. Such a program never fails to appeal to 
an audience. Long ago magicians and con- 
jurers used confederates in the audience, but 
this is one thing that is tabooed and no real 
magician will use a ‘“‘plant,’’ because the art 
has developed so that they are no longer 
needed. 

With so many interested and more and more 
taking an interest every year, it is plain that 
magic not only is not dead, but can never die 
and will be here until the stars go down. 

t t + 

Emmett and Company and Prof. C. A. Henry 

are playing in Southwest Texas. 


t + + 
G. W. Edington, wintering in Dallas, Tex., is 
building new apparatus for his motorized magic 
and illusion show, which will start out soon. 
+ ? t 
Bae Pierre Brookhart, French-Indian seer and 
mystic, is being featured this week at the 
Lyceum Theater, Winnipeg, Can. 
7 
A card from Van Hoven, mailed at Calgary, 
Can., March 2, bears this message: “It is 32 
degrees below here. Making my own ice.”” 
t t t 
Another great mystery show by the Minne- 
apolis Mystic Circle is scheduled for the night 
of March 18 in its club rooms, 207 South Fifth 
street. 


t ? t 
Hyp. and glass ball shows are scarce in Texas 
this season. Just a year ago there were ten 
such attractions there within a radius of 200 
miles, 
t t t 
Claude Eason, a nifty manipulator of billiard 
balls and pasteboards, recently finished a suc- 
cessful engagement with a stock musical com- 
pany in Dallas, Tex. 
t t + 
Prince Omwah, ‘Australian magician, crystal 
gazer and card expert,’’ will be with Howe’s 
Great London and Van Amberg Shows this sea- 
son, according to word from him in San Ber- 
nardino, Oal., where he has been wintering, and 


(Continued on page 75) 


OAKS’ NEW MAGIC CATALOG No. 22 


It is a modern 


pages. 


sevén hundred different items. This catalog contains 
everything of worth while importance in Magic, from 
the very latest pocket trick to the latest joke. 
catalog is beautifully illustrated throughout the 160 
You will find what you want in this catalog. 


Book of Mystery, embracing nearly 


The 


SENT PREPAID TO YOUR ADDRESS 10c 


OAKS MAGICAL CO. 


DEPT. 546 


OSHKOSH, WIS. 


M i i i 

agicians! 
Both professionals and amateurs will find the 
most wonderfnl possibilities for mind reading. 
use of the 


question and answer acts, etc., by the 
famous 


Little Gem Ear Phone 


Although manufactured primari'y to afford hear- 
ing for the deaf, it is of inestimable value in the 
hands of a magician, or for use at entertainments 
im the home. church or school. 

Almost no practice required. Cannot fail. Makes 
pam Ho -~ cleverest and most mysterious acts ever 
produced. 


The Little Gem Ear Phone is the simples: and 
smallest hearing device. 


Awarded the Gold Medal at 
The Panama-Pacific Exposition 


Our latest improvement. the Gem Sound Per- 
fector, insures clear, peottine hearing in any as- 
ay at any distan 


Auto Ear “rr is very effective for 
po head noises and for improving hearing. 


Call at our office for a free, private demonstra- 
tion. Expert advice without charge. ASK OBR 
WRITE FOR BOOKLET. 


Gem Ear Phone Co., Inc. 


806-B Marbridge Blidg., 47 W. 3th St., 
At B’way, N. Y. C. Phone, FitzRoy 3744. 


MAGICIANS’ HEADQUARTERS 


ARTINKA & CO., INC. 


The Oldest Magical Supply House in / merica 
Ventriloquist and Punch and sad Figures. 
Finest Gazing Crystal 
304 W. 34th Street, NEW YORK ciTy. 
Professional Catalog. 25 cents. 
Illusion Catalog, 25 certs, 


MAGICIANS 


Magical Apparatus, Card Tricks, 
Crystal Gazing Acts, Novelties, 
Jokes, Sensational Escapes from 
Handcuffs, Jails, Ropes. etc. 
Large assortment. Send for our 
large illustrated catalog. It's 


free. HEANEY MAGIC CO. 


jin, -« = Wisconsin 


DICE, CARDS 


Lodestone for magic use. Books, 
Novelties, ete. Catalogue free. 


B.B. SMYTHE CO. 


NEWARK, MO. 


STAGE MONEY 


Excellent quality Stage Money, $1.75 


per 1,000. If you use Card Tricks to 
sell, we have them. Enclose stamp for 
quotations. 


OAKS MAGICAL CO., 
OSHKOSH, WIS. 


They Copy All They Can Follow, But 


they could not copy my MIND. It’s left 


ts weary and puzzled a mile an 


a half Ae Am n 


ow 
presenting my original and unique ideas in Re DERS MENTAL GYMNASTICS, yet MULTIPLE MIND 


CONCENTRATION. 
of keen battle-axes. Always something 


¥ till doing five ings at one and the same li 
sway NEW AND DIFFERENT. 


tle time. Also blindfold juggling 


GLYNDON SMITH, care BILLBOARD, Los Angeles 


CORRESPONDENCE *SoLiciTeD FROM EVERYWHERE FOR 1923, 


R. S. SCHLOSSER MAGIC CO. 


959 SIXTH AVENUE, CORNER 54th STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Manufacturers of the Finest Feather Flowers, Magical Apparatus and Tilusions. 


Large Illustrated Professional List, 15c. 


Bargain List of Used apparatus FREE. 


Largest Catalogue ever issued. 


THAYER MFG. CO., - 


own Magica! Magazine every month. 
includes a quarterly subscription to The Magical Bulletin. 


334 S, San Pedro St., LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA. 


QUALITY MAGIC 


Mery ON HAND AND MADE TO qnenee.. LARGEST MAGIC 
ee A NUFACTURING PLANT IN THE WO 


—— IF IT FOOLS ’EM—WE HAVE IT 


largest Stock of Magical Books and Publications. om 
Catalogue and Complete Lists 50c, or $1.00 


MAGICIANS’ SUPPLIES 


DICE ===" =: CARDS 


VINE & CO., Swanton, Ohio 


MAGIC 


TRICKS, BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 
Feature Acts in Mind Reading and 
Spiritualism. Large stock. Best qual- 
ity. Prompt shipments. Large Illus- 
trated Professional Catalog, 10c, 


CHICAGO MAGIC CO. 
. 1440 S, Dearborn St., CHICAGO, ILL, 


SAWING A WOMAN ILLUSION—One Woman used. 
Complete, except saw, $65.00. i es 4 guaranteed 


Dept. 


Perfect. Half cash, balance 
nee ED. J. FAEHNLE. 
bus. Ohio. 


a D. Write or 
235 Buttles Ave., Colum- 


WANTED—A small attractive Lady to assist Ma- 
gician. Heicht. 5 ft., 5 in., or less; weight, 120 Ibs. 
or less. Experience ‘not necessary. Long engagement 
and good salary. Show opens 12th of April here. Ad- 
dress Harry Stilwell, Box 4, Jackman Statior. Maino. 


SAWING LADY IN HALF, 15c 
Vanishing Lady, Wa'king Through Plate Glass, com-= 
plete Handcuff Act, Mindreading Supreme, Cross Es- 
cape, New Trunk Escape, Spirit Cabinet, Packing 
Case Escape. Sealed Letter Test. All above ten Se- 

crets only $1, postpaid. Macic Catalog free. MAGIC 
FACTORY, 207 South 5th, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 


SIDE SHOW MAGICIANS 


I am Headquarters for the cheap line of Card Tricks, Magic Books and Novelties. Supply 90% of the Ma- 


gicians with goods to sell. 


Large stock always on hand, Prompt shipments. 


Lowest in price. My Trans- 


Besos Art Cards are the fastest selling novelty on earth. Price by the 1.000 as follows: Vice Versa Cards 


2.00; Phantom Cards, $3.50; Flop Cards, 
Books, 
$4.00; Stungs, $3.25. Send for price list. ¥ 


Oriental Dancers, $4.00; Keyhole Cards. , 
a 7 enka line of Samples sent for 25¢; 
AS. 


$3.50; Diminishing Cards, $1.50; Vanishing cards, $2.25; 


an 
Serna Art Ca 
LEE, 145 East 23d Street, New York, New York. 


00; Stage Money, $1. mt 


SIDE SHOW 


pace the bg A tempest manufacturers of C 
samples of 8 3 aimerent Card, Tricks 


Card Tricks and can at 
Magic Book is a cleanup ‘ar ™ at} * 


MOPEWALD NOVELTY CO.; 28t Highland Ave. Detroit, Mich. 


MAGICIANS 


ds for less . Buy 
$7.50 per “1 $1.00 per 100." Send 350 foF 


ILLUSIONS 
JOHN E. HAUFF 
324 N. Western Avenue, - = = Chicago. 
ILLUSION BUILDER 


Send 25c for Illustrated Catalog. 


EXPOSED!—Blood Test, Rockbreaking, Human 
Bridge, Catalepsy, Prolonged Sleep, Continuous 8!- 
cycle Riding and Piano Playing, and other tricks of 
Stage Hypostiate, Exhaustive manuscript of 15,000 


is, $2.5 
GEORGE. NEWMANN, _ Kenyon, Minnesota, 


RAJAH RABOID ‘ 
A GUARANTEED BOX-OFr ICS BETAASE ON, 


s 


rae 


<sdenanpstestieaectiaia ital ae Oe 


, . \ 
44) f 
a ee Ss 
ss e ? 
SSS 
y - Wj Y fy Y YY YY Yj F| 
Y Z Gy Yj YY Yui Va YY Yj Y YY Wf luifidi | 
|) Vn /NGIGIANS oat 
Yy y Y y 3 Uy i se 
\/M VM... = _ jy ff YY YY Abs | 
eH A 
pw # 
ee ee 
pai tt] 
ee | th) 
ee int | 
a i 
a 
ae 
a EE TL TT TS é 
eee H 
a 
pe ait | 
woe | 
. 
Pe Cer : 
NS RS : 
_ 
| a | | 
me ee re 
— 
ee 
ee ae 
| a a A ES AAT NAS EN EE ER 
‘ ( Sy ; 
Sheila 4 
| tI 
ee: 
TAT ST AEROS RA A TUNER a im ce 
A 
< “ON = F 
2 y 
ae a - / a a ee | 
a iM 
g) Sy . BE 
ee ee i | . 
ti \ 
mm tj Ki 
——_________ | | “an 
at i 
ay 
_ es (ee wt 
L. 7. 


74 


The Bi 


liboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


28TH YEAR 


Bi be d 
The largest circulation of any theatrical paper 
: in the world. 

‘i Published every week 
* By The Billboard Publishing Company, 
Rr W. H. DONALDSON, President, 


In its own plant at 
THE BILLBOARD BUILDING, 
25-27 Opera Place, 


Cincinnati, Ohio, - 


La 


SCS RE ER 
2 See 


U. 8, A. 


"i NEW YORK 
Phone, Bryant 8470, 
1493 Broadway. 
CHICAGO 
' Phone, Central 8480. 
‘ Crilly Building, Monroe and Dearborn Streets, 
PHILADELPHIA 
Phone, Tioga 3525. 
908 W. Sterner Street, 
PITTSBURG 
Phone, 1697 Smithfield. 
516 Lyceum Theater Bidg., Penn Avenue 
Sixth Street. 
‘Bes ST. LOUIS 
h wa Phone, Olive 1733. 
} 2024 Railway Exchange Bidg., Locust Street, 


@ Phone, Canal 5085. é 

Cable ard Telegraph Address, ““Billyboy,** Oin- 
mf cinnati. 

i ———— —==s 
ii BRANCH OFFICES: 

4 

iy 


at 


# 
il abes-2 


between Sixth and Seventh, 


KANSAS CITY 


Phones, Bell System, 3403 Main; Home System, 
3403 Harrison. 
417 Dwight Bldg., Tenth and Baltimore Ave. 


SAN FRANCISCO 


Phone, Kearny 4401. 
605 Pantages Theater Building. 


LONDON, ENGLAND 


Phone, Regent 1775. 
18 Charing Cross Road, W. C. 2. 
Cable and Telegraph address, ‘‘Showorldé.”* 
{ ; SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVES: 
H Baltimore, Md., 123 E. Baltimore St. 
: Birmingham, Ala., 1007 The Woodward. 
4 Boston, Mass., P. 
87 Paul St., Watertown, Mass, 
Cleveland, O., Hipp. Annex, 
Denver, Col., 430 Symes Bldg. 
2 Netroit, Mich., 1414 Jefferson Ave., E. 
+ Detroit, Mich., 208 Sun Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Cal., 755 Marco Pl., Venice, Cal. 
New Orleans, La., 2632 Dumaine St 
Omaha, Neb., 216 Brandeis Theater Bldg. 
Washington, D. C., 508 The Highlands, 
ADVERTISING RATES — Forty cents 
te line, agate measurement. Whole page, 4 
half page, $140; quarter page, $70. No adver- 
tisement measuring less than four lines ace 


7S one ising f 
: st advertising form goes to . 
eee Monday. . anlar, 
No telegraphed advertisements accepted un- 

less remittance is telegraphed or mailed s0 as 

to reach publication office before Monday noon, 


SUBSCRIPTION, PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 


¢ — U.S. &Can. Foreign. 
LD oeeeces .00 ¥ 

OS Regeqeeagene ° a4 r-4 

Three Months............ 1.00 1.25 


Remittances should be made by post-office or 
express money order or registered letter, ad- 
dressed or made payable to The Billboard Pub- 
lishing Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

The editor cannot undertake to return un- 
solicited manuscripts. Correspondents should 
keep copy. 


If you find a misstatement or error in an 
copy of The Biilboard, please notify the ounes, 

The Billboard reserves the right to edit all 
edvertising copy. 


Vol. XXXIV. MARCH 18 No. 11 


Editorial Comment 


REAL breath of Springtime! A 
welcome harbinger of the return 
of the bluebirds, the awakening 
of Nature and the Call of the Road! 
That in brief is what The Billboard 
ag Special, now before you, typi- 
es. 


The artist in designing the cover has 
most happily caught and expressed the 
elusive spirit associated with spring— 
that indefinable something which for 
want of a better term we call charm. 
The pleasing blending of colors and the 
simplicity of design are at once restful 
and expressive of virility—“aliveness” 
if we may coin a word. 

The promise that is expressed in the 
cover is carried out, we believe, in the 

* pages that follow. Who can look upon 

' the frontispiece and not catch some- 
thing of the spirit of the great out- 

doors? Who can read the spendid ar- 

‘ ticles and ng be interested and bene- 


: 


0. Box 1263; home address, , 


fited by them? Along with the purely 
practical we need something of the in- 
spirational as well, and it is found in 
abundance in the special articles. All 
of the regular departments are filled to 
overflowing with more than their usual 
amount of live news and announce- 
ments concerning the season just open- 
ing. The editors have tried to make 
this number the best Spring Special 
ever issued, and it is submitted in the 
confident belief that they have, at least 
to some extent, succeeded. 


“ HAT has 1922 to offer us?” 
Every showman, outdoor and 
indoor, is asking himself that 
question. And the answers are as 
various and varied as the natures of 
those who propound the query. 

What HAS 1922 to offer the show- 
man? It will not do to say that that 
depends altogether upon the showman 
himself, altho to a certain extent that 
may be true. Conditions over which 
the theatrical and show world in gen- 
eral has little control] have no small 
influence in shaping the course of 
events and determining whether the 
season will be good or bad as regards 
business. On the other hand, the show- 
man himself can do quite a bit of 
“shaping” too. He can, even as Na- 
poleon did, shape circumstances to his 
own ends if he will but put into his 
work the right sort of thought and 
energy, playing a square game, using 
good business judgment and not trying 
to “hog it all.” That is the conclusion 


these organizations, they intend to 
make a vigorous campaign for busi- 
ness. They are watching expenditures 
more closcly than in other years, elim- 
inating superfluous overhead and 
working out plans for the more efficient 
handling of their business. They are 
spending not niggardly, but wisely. 
The park and fair men, too, are laying 
their plans more carefully than usual, 
adopting measures looking to the elimi- 
nation of unnecessary expense, and in 
general placing their affairs on a more 
business-like plane. All of which is a 
good sign and should in the end be of 
inestimable benefit. The consensus of 
opinion seems to be that the earlier 
part of the season will be at least fair, 
growing steadily better as it advances; 
that by the time the fall fairs are in 
progress there will have been a general 
recovery from the unsettled and un- 
satisfactory conditions the country has 
been passing thru, and business will 
be BIG for those who see the oppor- 
tunity and prepare for it. 


Reports from stock and repertoire 
managers indicate that the ou.took in 
their field is exceedingly bright. Chau- 
tauqua circuits are expanding, and other 
lines of amusement activity extending 
thru the summer appear to have an 
excellent season before them. 


A statement from Secretary of the 
Treasury Mellon, regarded as a con- 
servative business man, is interesting 
as reflecting the optimism prevalent in 
Washington over the gencral business 


A FEW SPRING 


SPECIAL FACTS 


the editorial were these words: 


of 100,000 copies.” 
in the year’s time. 


required. 


Readers will recall the editorial published in the Spring Number of 
Tho Billboard of 1921, dealing with the growth of the Spring Special 
from the very first one gotten out on St. Patrick’s day, 1901. Concluding 


“We promise here and now that the issue of the next Spring Special 
(the 1921 edition was 90,000 copies) will go over the top with an edition 


And so it has, just as promised, meaning an advance of 10,000 copies 


This year’s Special contains 260 pages (thisywas written on Thurs- 
day, and there may be a “slopover” of eight or more pages before the 
last form goes on the press Monday night), 16 pages less than the 1921 
Special, but, taking into consideration the general business depression 
prevalent thruout the country the past twelve months or so, we think 
we have done wonders and believe that our readers will concur in this. 

In the way of paper, eightv-five (85) tons, ov four (4) carloads, were 


The first two forms (there are eight thirty-two page signatures, not 
figuring any “slopover”) went to press on Tuesday night, March 7, with 
a form following each night thereafter until the following Monday—all 
printing done on our own presses and in one week's time. The cover, in 
four colors, was also printed on our own color press. 


D20-5-6-4-9469099 FFF FOSS OOSOO SOOO OFS OS SS OOE OF 6665606648 


reached by those who have gone thru 
the mill and reached the top rung of 
success despite numerous obstacles. 
And they should know if anyone does. 


A canvass of those engaged in the 
amusement and entertainment fields 
justifies the assertion that the out- 
look for the season of 1922 is generally 
regarded quite optimistically. Show- 
men are proceeding with confidence and 
a determination to win. In justifica- 
tion of their attitude they call atten- 
tion to the encouraging reports from 
various branches of industry which in- 
dicate a steady improvement in condi- 
tions and a gradual progress toward 
“normality.” The United States Em- 
ployment Service, in its last monthly 
report, forecast a great industrial im- 
provement for March. It says: “Re- 
ports from 231 of the principal indus- 
trial centers, with but few exceptions, 
show a general improvement in em- 
ployment conditions, and breathe an 
enthusiastic spirit of hope and confi- 
dence in the future.” Other authori- 
ties speak in a similar vein. 


Of especial import at this time is the 
outlook for the outdoor show world, 
whose season is just starting. There 
has been the usual amount of re- 
organization among the circuses and 
carnivals, and a number of new enter- 
prises coming into the field. Judging 
by the amount of equipment and sup- 
plies purchased or contracted for by 


outlook. Mr. Mellon is reported as say- 
ing that if he were actively engaged in 
competition instead of being separated 
from such endeavor by reason of his 
Official position he would not hesitate 
to “loosen up the brakes a bit.” “Mr. 
Mellon's attitude,” says Roger Bean, 
in The Annalist,” was based upon re- 
ports which had reached the Treasury 
Department from various sources, some 
of them within the last ten days or two 
weeks. He felt that they indicated 
something more than an improvement 
resulting from seasona: change, and 


that they were sufficient to inspire con- 1 


fidence.” 


‘ Continuing, Mr. Bean says: “Other 
officials in Washington have, from time 
to time, expressed the belief that the 
‘corner was turned’—two authorities 
for this viewpoint being Secretary of 
Commerce Hoover and the Federal Re- 
serve Board, Secretary Hoover, in fact, 
by his recent urging that steps be 
taken without delay to add to railroad 
equipment and betterments, suggested 
to some observers a belief on his part 
that a very decided improvement might 
be expected in the spring.” 


Madisonville, ©., 1® soon to have a new 
$60,000 picture house. Plans for the building 
have been submitted to the local building com- 
wee by Chiles Weigel, who is at the 
head of the enterprise. It will be bamed 
Colonial, ea 


~ wel Maiew 


QUESTIONS 
ANSWERS 


R. R—“A War Baby” was a three-ree} 
— It was released by Lubin January 
» 1915. 


Cc. F. B.—Wolfe Gilbert and Anatol Friea- 
9 a on “Lily A 4 the Valley.” It 
eved Gilbert wrote lyric and Fried. 

land the melody, ” 


ee 

A Steady Reader—The only thing an amateur 
song writer can do is to submit his lyrics or 

gs to the publishers. If he happens to 
have what the publishers want the latter wil 
accept them. A regular publisher will buy 
anything from the bare title to the complete 
song, provided it strikes his fancy and he 
thinks it has commercial value, 


Mile. M.—John Coates and Waldemer Rosing 
are two of the most prominent tenors in Great 
Britain today, while Edmund Clement continues 
a prime favorite in Frange. Of his generation, 
Caruso undoubtedly possessed the finest tenor 
voice, The latter never sang Wagnerian opera, 
altho he was magnificient in the standani 
Italian and French operas. 


E. D.—‘‘Bought and Paid For” is now being 
filmed. The screen version of ‘‘Turn to the 
Right” has been completed. Both were popv- 
lar stage successes and also strong box-office 
attractions for leading stock companies. Some 
of the leading stock releases of the present 
time are as follows: ‘‘The Broken Wing,”’ “The 
Hottentot,"’ “‘Three Live Ghosts,”" “‘Come Ont 
of the Kitchen,” ‘Come Seven,’ ‘Smilin’ 
Thru,” “House of Glass,’’ “Clarence,” ‘‘Up- 
stairs and Down,’’ “Smooth as Silk,”’ “Adam 
and Eva,’ “Pot Luck,” ‘‘Lion and the Mouse," 
“Daddies,” ‘Her Husband’s Wife," “Experi- 
ence,” “Cornered,”” ‘“‘Shavings,"* ‘“T'wo-Fisted 
Love,” “Stop Thief,’ “Cappy Ricks” and 
many others. 


NEW THEATERS 


The new million-dollar Hope Theater at Dal- 
las, Tex., is nearing completion. It will show 
First National pictures exclusively. 

A modern theater, to replace the Daly, re 
cently destroyed by fire, will be built in 
Marshfield, Wis., at a cost of $50,000. 


April 1 is the date set by the Comerford 
Amusement Oompany for starting work on the 
wd picture house to be built in Carbondale, 

Poa 

The Century Theater, Dowagiac, Mich., was 
opened February 27. It was built by the Larkin 
Theater Company at a cost of $100,000. Lee 
Larkin is manager. 


“OLD DAN RICE” 
By W. B. LEONARD 
I traveled with a circus once, we went from 


played the clown; 

I helped to put the canvas up and helped to 
take it down. 

The “trick? was owned by old Dan Rice, of 
Wagon sbow renown. 

REFRAIN 
ola Ben Bios, be eatttely uae a wonder in the 
ye 0 ng Syne. 

Old Dan Rice, he seldom made a blunder, and 
his circus it was fine. 

He made such funny faces that the people they 
would scream. 

He could preach a corking sermon and could 
warble like a dream. 

He'd give you wonderful advice, this circus map 
they called Dan Rice. 


I sold the concert tickets and I helped to make 


I figured in the grand entree, a eong I'd 
sometimes sing; 
worked around the cookhouse, all the water 


I went into the HMon’s cage, I bored the 
kangaroo; 
{ rode upon the elephant all made up like 4 


200; 

I held the paper banners the equestriennes 
Jumped thru, 

When 1 traveled with a circus I had © 10 


T drove the “sixty homes” en the “chariot of 
. mg FE out ant Ge git 
. OT on ee eae @ 
When I traveled with a cireus it was certainly 

Bo play. i 
“Kid Show" and I sometimes 


I bung around the 


| ae@ 
’ 
a: a : eee 
a 
i is a ee 
i a SR Sa a ne 
ir? ee . 
DEF OF EEF CHESHFESEF OHO EEOOEEEE FOOSE OO OOS SHES OE OO FOOO 
« ; ; I played a cornet in the band and sometimes 
EE 
: ———————— ae 
ke 
= — _ 
” —— — es 
» a Oe—S—CSSSSCis 
3 a I wonld bring. 
| I surely was a busy man, I never missed 8 
a : 
“worked the shells’, 
And I “capped” the “three-card monte” til! 
I heard the “hey, robe’ vells, 
And I never thonght o° “blowing” if the “ghost 
refus to e, 
For with old Dan Rice's outfit there was never 
any strike. 
M4 Ys (All rights resermed) 
. 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


75 


THEATRICAL BRIEFS 


Jack Beckner, of Newman, IIL, 
purchased the Illinois Theater there, 


recently 


The Princess Theater Company has been 
chartered in Monroe, La., with a capital ot 
$5,000. 


Robert J. Harmon last week leased the 
Knickermocker Theater, Columbus, 0., from 
the Knickerbocker Theater Company and the 
American Guaranty Company. 

Margtaff Brothers have purchased the site in 
Milwaukee, Wis., now occupied by the Magnet 
Theater from Oscar Brachman. The new 
owners plan to erect a $100,000 office building. 


to extinguish a small fire in 
the operating booth of the Elite Theater, 
Washington, D. C., Frederick Kittredge was 
painfully burned. The accident occurred 
March 2. 


While trying 


Ideal Theater Company, DeNoys, Ok., with 
a capital stock of $25,000, was recently formed. 
Incorporators: A. B. Momand, Shawnee; J. F. 
DeNoys, Ponca City, and Seth Lewis, Pawhuska, 
Ok. 


The Star Theater, Hummelstown, Pa., 
operated for several years by B. F. Bom- 
gardner, has been leased to Sollenberger & 
Gerth, of Hershey, who operate the Iroquols 
Theater at Palmyra. 


Fire Chief Ira A. Humeston, of Newark, N. 
¥., declared the Crescent Theater, that city, 
unsafe and ordered it closed. The Crescent is 
owned by G. W. Croucher and has been used as 
a picture theater for fifteen years. 


At a meeting of the company recently formed 
to purchase the Carthage Opera House, Car- 
thage, N. Y., the following directors were 
elected: BE. A. Walsh, W. 0. Adner, ©. J. 
Reeder, J. Coyle and ©. Chauft. The company 
will be known as the Carthage Holding Com- 
pany. 


Cowan and Rudolph, managers of the Pic- 
torium and Vale theaters in Dennison and 
Uhichsville, ©., respectively, have leased the 
Grand Theater, Dennison, for a period of ten 
years with a clause in the contract giving them 
the privilege of purchasing the theater if they 

so desire. 


A fire of unknown origin completely de- 
stroyed the Garden Theater and damaged sev- 
eral adjoining buildings, Petersburg, Va., 
March 1, the total loss being estimated at 
$35,000. W. F. Harris, owner of the theater, 
bas removed to another house directly opposite, 
alterations having just been finished. 


At a recent meeting of the Marion (0.) Grand 
Theater Company Joseph D. Guthery was 
elected president, A. J. Sautter vice-president, 
and W. D. Clark secretary, trgneeer and 
general manager. Directors are: A.~J. Sautter, 
Joseph Guthery, W. D. Clark, George H. Foster 
and Charles McMurray. 


MAGIC AND MAGICIANS 
(Continued from page 73) 
appeared to advantage at the recent ten-day 
orange show. , F , 


Kara is attracting added attention at present 


The Same Service is for You, too! 


Hundreds of thousands of our successful men and 
women—business men, farmers, mechanics, parents, 
teachers, writers, clergymen, lawyers, advertising men, 
librarians, all are being served by 


Webster’s NEW INTERNATIONAL Dictionary 
The Merriam-Webster 


This host of successful Webster 
owners who are satisfied with 
Webster service, who have their 
needs anticipated and supplied, 
whose questions about new and 
old words, noted persons and 
places, questions of what, why 
and how, here answered with the 
authority of the world’s scholars, 
should encourage the young man 
or woman, even though near the 
foot of the ladder, to profit from rh 


rere al 


the same service. The one who (WY 
knows wins success. \ a 
400,000 Vocabulary Terms E t 
2700 Pages. 6000 Illustrations = 
30,000 Geographical Subjects 2 
12,000 Biographical Entries 
Regular and India-Paper Editions — 


_ Write for specimen pages, illustrations, ete. 
Free, a set of pocket maps if you name The Billboard. 


G. & C. MERRIAM COMPANY 


SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 


EVERYTHING IN 
Z-e~ KNIT GOODS FOR 
[MERIDIAN THE SHOW GAME =~: 


a REN and Tights, Union Suits, Opera 

= Hose, Leotards, Puffed Trunks. 
All kinds of Special Suits—Demon, Frog, Snake, 
Skeleton, etc. Cotton, Silkoline, Worsted, Pure 
Silk. Wholesale Only. Write for Prices. 


EDWARD NOON & SON isractt'2 S322 


Knit Goods Since 1865 
4017-35 Germantown Ave. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


wu 
Deer, SS 


Surgery”? illusion, he says, 


in the western part of Pennsylvania by anno 
ing in his newspaper ads: “I say Henry Ford will 
be Presidént of the United = 
t t 
From Denison, Tex., comes word that Davis, 
the lyceum magician, recently pleased a large 
audience there with a clever performance in 
which old standbys were offered in new dress. 
+ ? + 
Lindep Heverly advises from his home in 
Sayre, Pa., that he has recovered from his re- 
cent fliness and is mow preparing new fea- 
tures for his mystery show for the coming 
season. 
? 


t ? 

W. T. McQuade, “‘Texas’ own magician,”’ is 
working on a new book of magic at his home 
in Leonard, Tex., where he has been since his 
full evening mystery show closed shortly before 
Christmas. 


t t t 
Prince Ali ©. V, Sadhoo, billed as “‘the noted 
Hindu astrologist, crystal gazer, life reader and 
wizard of the Orient,”* and supported by Princess 


BETTER PRINTING CHEAPER 


Special Prices on Four Page Heralds 


5,000, SI 6x: 13.50. 
a, hae SP Oo is, $50.00. 


ANOTHER BiG SPECI 
ANOTHER BIG ECIAL 
1,000 14x22 Cards, One Color........... Satenee :¥4 
ee aly Cards, One Coler.. Sopa sznesrecas sage 
© print everything to your 
paper. All type work. Union ‘sTabel oneduced 
Prices on All Work. 


CHRONICLE PRINTING CO. 


Locansporr, ‘Esabliehed 1879) pian, sand 


Natvre 


Vanish Wrinkles While You Sleep 


All wrinkles and crow’s feet that mar your beauty can easily and quickly 
be smoothed out and vanished while you sleep. All you need do 


is to apply 
B & P Wrinkle Eradicators 
and Frowners 
‘ore retiring, ute 


They are absolutely harmless, simple gad easy to Fast becoming a 
poy Bee 4 Made in wo sty styles—Eradicators, for lines in the face, and Frewners, for between 


Sither kind sold in 65c and $1.00 pene at 6 os and department stores everywhere. ‘Trial pack- 


age 35c, including booklet, ‘Dressing If your dealer’s supply is exhausted, we will 
send direct, postpaid, on receipt of ~ Rs 


THE B. & P. COMPANY, 12224 Euclid Ave, CLEVELAND, OHIO 


ARTISTIC STAGE SETTING IN PLUSH, DYE, WATER COLORS 


TIFFIN SCENIC STUDIOS, Tiffin, Ohio 


MEDIUM PRICES FAIR TERMS 


TOURIST TRUCK, Complete Home with Modern Improvements 


ht thousand; run about three Gomend miles. Sacrifice. four thou- 
a le; new last year; cost ws Lewis, 580 ve 


Isis, ‘‘India’s famous mind-reader,” is appear 
ing in the East under management of John J. 
Wilson. 
t ? T 

Mystic F, P. Schopper, Jr., treasurer of the 
Cincinnati Magicians’ Club, recently presented a 
rapid-fire Hiodu turn for the Nobles of the 
Mystie Shrine at their ceremonial in the Musie 


Hall, that city, which was attended by 3,000 
members, 
t t t 
“Mahdi,”? the ‘miracle worker,’ communi.« 


cates that he has signed to present “A Trip to 
Mystic Town,” with the T. A. Wolfe Superior 
Shows for the coming season, and will be as- 
sisted by ‘“‘Olivette.””. Some new spiritualistic 
effects are promised. 
t ? t 
So generally recognized is Houdini as the king 
of escape artists that his name bas been put 
into a standard dictionary as a verb. The word 
“houdini,””» as Funk & Wagnalls explain it, 
means to release or extricate one’s self from 
bonds or the like, as by wriggling out.” 
t ? + 
Herbert A. Taylor, “prince of magic and 
clown juggler,’® narrates that he has signed to 
appear on the Swarthmore Chautauqua Circuit 
this season, and states that he has been busily’ 
engaged in and around Boston the past two 
years. He features an old-fashioned Punch and 
Judy show for children. 
t t 7 
Abdul Hamid, who is supported by Prineess 
Iza, ‘‘India’s mental marvel,’”’ advises favorabiy 
on returns of his show this winter thru Michigan 
and Ohio, and says he will present a Palace of 
Illusions with the United Amusement Company 
during its coming tour. The ‘‘Hindu Bloodless 
will be featured. 
t t t 
Last week was a red letter one for the Pitts- 
burg Association of Magictans. Houdiny was 
ho'ding forth at the Keith house there and 
more than once was his baffling demonstration 
viewed by the Smoky City slickers. Needless 
to mention, the occasion did not pass without 
appropriate dinner parties and entertainments 
being tendered in honor of the distinguished 
Visitor, 


Raffles, “the most mysterious man in the 
world,” closed a tour of the Loew Circuit a 
few weeks ago in Atlanta, Ga., and is now 
business manager for the act of Webster, ‘‘the 
psychic wonder.” L. G. Smith, a member of 
the Chattanooga (Tenn.) Conjurers’ Club, also 
started with Webster recently as assistant. 
The Webster attraction is playing Southern ter. 
ritory. 

t ? t 

With this special edition of The’ Billboard 
chock full of news on the plans of outdoor shows 
for the coming season, it will, no doubt, be in- 
teresting to the fans of this department to note 
that Thurston began his professional career with 
a circus side-show. One of Thurston’s early 
resolutions was to keep plugging and improving 
his work as 2 magician so as to reach the top 
of his field, and to say he has arrived is putting 
it mildly. It is not impossible that a Thurston 
of tomorrow may make his debut this year with 
one of the tented attractions commented upon 
in these pages, 

t t 


8S. S. Henry, ‘‘the great magician,’® succéss- © 


fully displayed his wares to a lyceum audience 
in Dayton, 0., last Thursday night. At the 
same time Arthur D, Gans, “the safety first 
magician,’’ was also appearing in that city be- 
fore employees of the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road, A few days earlier Gans and R. S, Sugden 
were entertained by W. W. Durbin at his 
private theater in Kenton, 0. Sugden, formerly 
on the Keith Circuit, is an all-round magician 
and at present is in business that calls for 
travel thru Ohio and Pennsylvania. He and 
Gans were happy, indeed, to have enjoyed the 
feast of magic which Durbin offered. In this 
connection Gans stated: ‘I have traveled consider- 
ably and met many magic enthusiasts, but I 
have yet to see one with as large a magic 
theater or such a collection of photographs and 
apparatus as has Mr. Durbin. I saw things out 
of the beaten path that have done me good. 
The magic lover who is fortunate enough to get 
within 100 miles of Kenton and fails to visit 
Mr. Durbin will be doing himself an injustice."” 


SHOW PRINTING 


Best Workmanship—Prompt Service ‘ 


TYPE and BLOCK WORK 


Dates, Cards, Heralds and Banners 


Stock Pictorial Paper for practi- 
cally every attraction. 


The Donaldson Litho Co. 


NEWPORT, KENTUCKY. 
OPPOSITE CINOINNATE 


, a eee = an 
 — ay 
——— hw || 
7 ee a 
| wt 
| | 
ee : 
a ut 
a | ae a i | | 
po Ss -, \ ial ' 
 |\ ae | 
a Fa A A Sn ‘ 
££, ff \ \ x Ni Y/ if ih ‘ 
—— > / \We TA 
Pie X \ ' iA fk ; 
| sy wo | i i” Nf ' 
JG Vy Ne | 
— iss a } . I: 
eae | J hh 
iene” | 
| | 
| 
3 
— es | oe 
pr ene en re a Ry 
re i 
mm? 7 
saith / 6 
Bn. ” 
SS 
J PO  Biey 
¢ a . 
i ' 
ee ; 
ee | 
ae 7 Hay 
B.S, See Se ' ' 
Ls 8+ 
po — LU 1) 
| 
ed a | 
ee a at ies 
rrr | | 
Se HE 
ML 
‘es aha re 


ee 


The Billboard 


MARCH 18, 1922 


yy fy 


Y, Yi Yy, yyy 
YY Yi Yy YY Yyf 


Yj 


Y YY 


Yy Yy VY 
Uy Yj YY, Y 
MJ Gye“ 


Uy YY i Yj fy 


HIPPODROME] 
) SIDE SHOW 


SS 
SS 
\N 


NO CIRCUS ACTS 
WILL BE CARRIED 


Howe’s Great London Show 
Performance Will Be Given Ex- 
clusively by Animals 


ar 

Palo Alto, Cal., March 8.—Completely rebuilt 
and with five additional cars Howe's Great Lon- 
don Circus and Van Amburg's Wild Animals 
hits the road March 23 under the ownersbip of 
M. E. Golden, Charles Adams and M. B. Run- 
kle.. Mr. (iolden will have general direction 
of the organization, with Charlies T. Boulware, 
for Beveral years one of the Al G. Barnes 
Circi® standbys, as active manager. Mr. Run- 
kle wi'l be treasurer, while Mr. Adams will 
have charge of lot activities. 

No circus acts will be carried. The perform- 
ance will be given exclusively by animals. 
The big feature of the performance will be 
a colorful spectacle, ‘‘Cinderei'a in Jungleland.’ 
Every animal in the show will be introduced 
in the spectacle, special dens having been built 
for this purpose. Several soloists of ability— 
both male and female—wi'l have  principa! 
roles. There will also be a chorus. Special 
music bas been written for the extravaganza. 

Mons. Jules Jacat was brought over from 
France by Mr. Golden to take charge of the 


menagerie. One group of seventeen lions offers 
an act that is expected to create a furore. 
Several riding lions, two ‘‘balloon’’ lions and 


a half dozen mixed groups of jungle animals 
form some of the more impressive acts of 
the program. 

One of the especially advertised features is 
“‘Mizpah,’’ the only white sacred camel ever 
brought to America, according to the adver- 
tis'ng matter. This came] is particularly in- 
telligent and will appear in a novelty act. 

The pachydermic section of the menagerie 
will soon be increased by the arrival of six 
sma’) elephants now in Singapore on which Mr. 
Golden recently obtained an option. 

Sixteen additional baggage horses—eight 
blacks and eight dapples—were recently pur- 
chased and brought the stock department up 
to a high standard. 

“Wild Horse Mike’? Brahm and his group 
of cowboys and cowgirls bave been in winter 
quarters for a month with five real outlaw 
bronchos and as fine a collection of ‘‘spots’’ 
as ever made parade. 

Bert Chipman, manager of the No. 1 advance 
ear, gol away on schedule with sixteen ex- 
perienced billers, and A. Van Buhre, with a 
brigade of six men, followed a week later. 

All the dens in the parade will be open and 
each will carry a fair passenger in addition 
to the jungie representatives. 
two calliopes will put lots of ‘‘pep’’ into the 
street pageant. A beautiful golden slipper, 
mounted on a low flat wagon and surrounded 
by pretty girls attractively garbed, will be 


Three bands and 


a brillant feature of the parade. Superin- 
tendent James Babcock promised to have it 
ready two weeks before the opening date, 
and he kept bis word 


John Randolph Fowler, side show manager, 
Was around quarters all winter and had no 
difficulty in lining up a most attractive col- 
lection of unusual attractions. His o'd stand- 
bys, Grace Gilbert, the famous bearded lady, 
and Col. Ludwig, who have been with him sev- 
eral seasons, are back under his wing again. 

Charles Fulton bas an elaborate menage act 
lined up with twenty-one riders. Nearly two 
score ponies will also be offered under his 
direction. C. G. Giles, for ten years with the 
Al G. Barnes Circus, will be in the big show 
ticket wagon.—JAMES FRANK (Press Repre- 
entative), 


Games, Newton Circus 


TRUNKS 


Send for Catalog. 
Trunks Guaranteed. 


QUALITY—Guaranteed. 


4, i— NEWTON oe co. 
SERVICE—As you want it. 
PRICES — Manufacturers’, 


TENTS See f=: 


Se mae emer 
C. R. DANIELS, INC, 114-115 South St.. N. ¥.C. 


Horse and Pony Plumes 
H. SCHAEMBS 


10414 89th Avenue. RICHMOND HILL. N. Y. 


Formerly 612 Metropolitan Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
- Write for Catalogue. 


itt CODY STAMPEDE AT CODY, WYO. 


Will be held July 4, 5, 6. Purses for Bucking Bull- 
dogging and Bareback Riding to be announced later. 


PLEASANTVILLE, N. J. 


SELLS-FLOTO CIRCUS 


Ready for the Opening at the Coliseum, 
Chicago 


With the stage all set for the opening of the 


Greater Sells-Floto Circus at the Coliseum, 


Chicago, April 8, for a three weeks’ engage- 
ment, Messrs. Mugivan, Bowers, Ballard and 
Terrell have bent forward every effort to 


startle the circus-loving public with a number 
of revelations in this popular form of amuse- 
ment 

The big three-ring and two-stage circus per- 
formance will be preceded by a spectacle. It 
is said that the ballet-girls will total close to a 
hundred. Singing, Jed by three prima donnas 
seated in the swinging hodahs of gorgeously be- 
decked elephants, assisted by the same number 
of baritones who will act as mahouts, will 
predominate during the opening number and 
their voices will blend in with that of hun- 
dreds. Revelations in ‘lead stock” will be 
seen here which will depict the grand Dubars 
of old India. All wardrobe used in this num- 
ber is new and of New York creation. It 
was purchased by ‘“General’’ Terrell during 
his centinenta]l trip early last winter, when 
in quest of novelties. 

The Famous Riding Hannaford Family with 


**Poodles’ will again be featured and this 
well-known riding act, supported by the 
Hodgini, Hobson and Derrick troupes of bare- 


back riders, will keen the equestrian number 
perfectly balanced. The Firing Nelsons, Todd 
and Beck and another big casting act will 
work overhead from riggings and these well- 
Known acrialists will be in turn supportea by 
Many singles and doubles. The ‘‘iron-jaw’’ 
number will find many young ladies suspended 
by their teeth. The huge under-roof of the 
gigantic Coliseum will literally be speckled 
with ‘fying acts.” 
Two troupes of Arabs, two troupes of Jap- 
anese, a troupe of nine Chinese and a Russian 
wrestling act will be featured on the two 
stages. Herberta Beason, the l’avlowa of the 
wire, will be featured as will the Great Shu- 
bert, Belle McMahon, Beatrice Sweeney, Loftus, 
the great, and a group of twelve horses 
known as the Terrell Dancing Equines. Prob- 
ably the only animal number wi!l be the four- 
teen elephants and ten camels which work ino 
“straight and combined acts 
special musical score bas been written 


ANDHIS MAIEST THE TROUPERS 


e the pageant and the orchestra of the 

Brown Palace Hotel of Denver “tried it 
out” a couple of weeks ago with gratifying re- 
sults. The numbers were announced and each 
Part heavily app 'auded. 

As announced in The Billboard a few weeks 
Past, Sells-Floto will only play the larger 
cities this season, The performance will re- 
main “strictly a straight circus performance” 
with no leaning toward wild animal Siepleye 
during its entertainment.—FRANK ARTHUR 
(for the Show). 


LaMONT BROS.’ 


Doe Filley, general agent of LaMont Bros.’ 
Circus, writes that he recently visited the win- 
ter quarters of the LaMont show at Salem, 
IL., and found it a busy place. New and 
larger wagons have been built to replace the 
small ones used last season. A beautiful band 
Wagon for a ten-piece band has been added, 
and a new calliope will bring up the rear of 


SHOW 


the parade. All of the old harness and trap- 
pings have been replaced with new para- 
phernalia. The cookhouxe wagon is equipped 


with a sanitary refrigerator. Manager LaMont 
recently purchased several baggage horses and 
ponies. rainers are busy breaking domestic and 
wi'd animal acts. Among the latter is a lion 
act which will be worked in the No. 2 ring. 
The baby elephant will put on some new stunts 


this season. A new big top and two more 
middle pieces for the side show have been 
added. Uncle Abe Arnheart is looking after 


the band personnel. 
of clown alley. 

Filley is now blazing the trall In new terri- 
tory. The advance wil! consist of a peace 
agent and two ng a senveling by auto. 
The season will open May 1 


DeMARLOS WITH RAB. SHOW 


Baker will have charge 


Harry DeMario, while playing at the Shriners’ 
Senne Circus in Cincinnati, week of February 
27, called at The Billboard offices and informed 
us that he and his wife will again be with 
the Ringling-Barnum Circus. he DeMarlos 
played a two weeks’ engagement in Detrojt for 
the Shriners’ Circus previous to their local 
date. DeMarlo is an exceptional contortionist, 
accomp! a some very difficult feats, and 
gecesved much applause at the Cincinnati Shrine 

reus, 


GIANT WART HOG 


Finest specimen ever imported. Enormous tusks. Mane fourteen inches 
long. Perfectly developed head. Greatest feature on earth for Pit Show, 


HORNE’S ZOOLOGICAL ARENA CO. Kansas City, Mo. 


LIONS-TIGERS- PUMAS 


Kangaroos, Cassowaries, Zebus, 


European Wild Boars, 


Storks, Cranes, 


Monkeys, Llamas, Elephants, Camels, Zebras, Animals, Birds and Rep- 


tiles of all kinds. 


HORNE’S ZOOLOGICAL ARENA CO., Kansas City, Mo. 


62-Foot NEW FLAT CAR 


$950.00 
EACH 


Simplex trucks, all sills and gunnels made of single one-piece timbers, 
none spliced; 8 heavy truss rods, none ever built better, and you can’t 


beat or equal this price. 


Also Combination, Baggage, Sleepers, Stock 


and Box Cars, Circus Wagons, Seats, Poles, Stakes, Lights, Chalks and 


all other show equipment. 


HORNE’S ZOOLOGICAL ARENA CO., Kansas City, Mo. 


H. G, HUSBAND, Mgr. 


VEAL BROS. SHOW 

SOL’S UNITED SHOWS 
CRAWFORD'S ATTRACTION 
CHES DAVIS MINSTRELS 
JACK KLEIN 


NASHVILLE 


TENT & AWNING CO. 


CARNIVAL and CIRCUS—QUALITY and WORKMANSHIP 


REFERENCES 


NASHVILLE, TENN, 


ROY GRAY’S SHOW 

JIM ESKEW’S WILD WEST 
HASSON BROS. SHOWS 
HARRY DICKINSON 
MILLER BROS. SHOW 


Y yy 


YY 
Uy Yy YY 


WE MAKE ONLY 
“Tents That Satisfy 


a = , . circus terest 

them. But if it is a 

CONCESSION ‘oR aC ARNIVAL Tent. don’t 

fall to get our prices and samples before 
placing your order. 

Our efforts have been concentrated toward 
making the BEST Concession and Carnival 
Tent at a moderate cost, You may never have 
seen tents of our make, Don’t pass up writ- 
ing us for that reason. You will see them 
because the tents we make are our advertise- 
ment, and our customers are best sales- 


my 
We solicit your inquiry, 


SOUTHERN TENT & AWNING CO. 


159-165 E. Short St., LEXINGTON, KY. 


SNAKES 


BOA CONSTRICTORS 


Finest Lot ever offered. 6 feet up to 
12 feet. Low Prices. 


MONKEYS TOO 
BARTEL’S “Stwror: 


NEW YOK CITY 


FLAT CARS 


80,000 CAP. 40 FT. BARGAIN 


IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
E. R. BRIGHAM 


327 So. LaSalle St., CHICAGO. 


SHOW 
CARNIVAL 
Send for Catalog and Second-Hand List 


J.C. GOSS CO. 


DETROIT, MICH. 


TENTS 
CONCESSIQN AND CARNIVAL 


TENTS 


Made to suit you. . , Rant, Bet Trimmed, Striped, 
SOUTH BEND AWNING CO., South Bend, Ind. 


106-110 Broadway 
' BROOKLYN, New York. 


TENTS, AWNINGS, CANVAS GOODS 
SMITH BROS. 


718-720 North Wells St., CHICAGO, ILL. 


WE CAN AT ALL TIMES FURNISH 
THE FOLLOWING ANIMALS 


for Parks. Side Shows, Pit Shows, Carnivals _etc.. 
at best prices’ BEARS, COYOTES. WOLF LYNX 

COONS _BOB CATS. ODORLESS SKUNKS and 
OWLS, Eagies. Deer Fox; in fact, any kind of 
North American Anima) or Bird  A'so Dogs for 
Training, viz: Fox Terrier. Collie, Poodles, Spitz ot 
any kind wanted in young grown Dogs. THE MIN-+ 

NEAPOLIS DCG & BIRD STORE. 4 No, 7th St. 
Minneapolis. Minnesota. 


ad 
SAY “! SAW IT IN THE BILLBOARD.” 


76 es ee 
jf/yy// YW MJ 
RAILROAD Y Yf- bl, Y MMMM A PIT SHOWS 
= AGI BRIE Ses 
| OVERLAND yy Wy yj) PRIVILEGES 
1%, mm — 
is a oe 
ae es 
‘ a 
— ae 
i FE 
TT SS EL LT YL ESTES AT se tN 
: ee 
‘ a 
OT SS A a eR NN 
6 TS STROSS 
. . ees SSAEELENaENSEEREOREEeaea 
>= : $5 EJ AYDEN 
4 1 A e- CO..INC. IN 
- may A any 
; CIRCUS = x Yo 
san Grupos 
3 | BANNERS 
Os FRONTS A: re 
ez | 
ES, ESS 
a 
a _—— | ee 
hii 
‘ 
SaltnnES SEE EERIE EES UEREEREEEEEERSEED 
a —————_ ae 
ae 
| pe 


MARCH 18, 1922 


The Billboard 


77 


NEW AND USED TENTS IN STOCK READY FOR SHIPMENT 


ROUND END TENTS 


= ds, 8-oz, white drill t 
20x30 round ends, 8-02, white op, 

see tt. sidewall of 6%4-0z. drill, water- 
proofed; used 3 months. 

3670—20x30 round ends, 8-0z. white drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-oz. drill; used 2 
months. 

3682—20x30 round ends, 202 drill top, 10-ft. 
sidewall of 6%4-0z. drill; — . 
20x80 round ends, 8-oz. white drill top, 

aay sidewall of 64-02. drill; used 7 


8-oz. white drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall 6%-oz. drill, 


blue trim- 
mings; used 10 days. 
3691—20x30 round ends, 8-oz, khaki drill top, 
9-ft. sidewall of 6%-oz. khaki, red trim- 
mings; used 1 month. 
4313—20x30 round ends, 8-0z. white drill top, 
10-ft, sidewall of 6%4-oz. drill; used 10 


davs. 
20x50 round ends, 8-oz. khaki drill top. 

On. sidewall of 8oz, kbaki drill; used 
1 month. 

3957—20x50 round ends, 8-oz. khaki drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall of 8-oz. khaki drill; used 
10 days. 

3958—20x50 round ends, 8-oz. white drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall of 8-oz. white drill; used 
10 days. 

3965—20x50 round ends, 8-oz, white dril] top, 
10-ft. sidewall of Boyle’s AA drill; used 


days. 
3687—20x30 round ends, 


10 days. 
20x50 round ends, 8-oz. white drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-oz, drill; used 10 


days. 
04—20x60 round ends, 8-oz. white drill top, 
= 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-0z. drill; used 3 


Sed)’ round ends, 8-oz, white dri top 
20x60 round ends, . ’ 
ss ote. ‘sidewall, of 634-08, drill, white 
trimmings; weed. = om arin ¢ 
4489—30x60 round ends, 5-02. e X 
10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-oz. drill; used Pi 
davs. 
94—30x60 round ends, made of white drill, 
aes 10-ft. sidewall, blue trimmings, white 
curtain; nsed 14 days. 
4498—30x60 round ends, 8-oz. white drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall of 6%-oz. drill; in good 
condition, 
5005—80x60 round ends, 8-oz. white drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall of 6%-oz. drill, blue trim- 
mings, white curta'n; used 2 days. 
9—45x65 round ends, 8-0z. white drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall of 6%-oz, drill; brand 


new. 
§908—35x70 round ends, 8-oz. khaki drill top, 
9-ft. sidewall; used 1 season. 


ROUND AND GABLE END TENTS 


$674—20x30 round and gable end tent, S8-oz. 
white drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-oz. 
drill; used 3 weeks. 

round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 

white dr'll top, 10-ft. sidewall of 614-02. 

: used 5 days. 

round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 
white drill top. 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-oz. 

; used 1 day. 

3698—20x30 round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 
white drilj top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6'-oz. 
drill. blue trimmings: used 1 day. 

$824—20x40 round and gable end tent, §8-oz. 
white drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%-oz. 
drill; good condition. 

3834—20x40 round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 
white drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%-0z. 
drill; used 4 days. 

3961—20x50 round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 
khaki drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-oz. 
khaki drill; used 2 weeks. 

3962—20x50 round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 
khaki drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 644-0z. 
khaki drill: used 3 months. 

3963—20x50 round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 
khaki drill top, 10-ft, sidewall of 6%-oz. 
khaki dri'l, red trimmings, khaki cur- 
tain; used 1 week. 

3964—20x50 round and. gable end tent, 8-oz. 
kbaki drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 644-oz. 


khaki drill, red trimmings, khaki cur- 
tain; used 2 weeks. 
3966-—20x50 round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 


white drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-0z. 
white drill; used 2 weeks. ‘ 

3972—25x50 round and gable end tent, red and 
white ha'f widths, 10-ft, sidewall, 7-ft. 
pitch; used 2 weeks, 

3967—20x00 round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 
white drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%-0z. 
drill; used 1 day. 

4109—20x°0 round and gable end tent, 8-o-. 
khaki drill tep, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-0z. 
khaki drill; used 3 weeks. 

4110—20x60 round and gable end tent, S-oz. 
khaki dri'] tep, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-0z. 
khaki drill; used 1 week. 

4111—20x60 round and gable end tent, 8-oz. 
khaki drill top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-o0z. 
khaki drill, red trimmings, khaki cur- 
tains; used 1 week. 

4113—20x60 rovnd and gable end tent, made of 
white drill, 10-ft. sidewall, blue trim- 
mings, white curtains; used 5 days, 


SQUARE HIP END TENTS 


3684—20x30 hip ends, 8-oz. white drill top, 
10-ft. sidewall of 6'4-oz, drill, blue trim- 


mings; used 2 weeks. 

3685—20.20 hip ends, 8-02. white drill top 
de sidewal] of 6'%-oz, drill; used 2 
weeks 


3829—20x 10 hip roof tent, 8-oz, white drill ton, 
10-ft. —ren of 6%-oz. dril, blue trim- 
mings, white curtain; used 3 weeks, 

$833—20x40 hip roof tent, 8-oz, white drill top 
10-ft. sidewall of 6'4-oz. drill, white 
trimmings; used 3 weeks. 

3835—20x40 hip ‘roof tent, S-oz. white drill top, 


ft. ; sidewall of 6'4-oz. drill, white 
riminmings; used 3 week. 
8968—20x50 hip roof tent, 8-oz. white drill 


top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-oz. drill; used 


1 day, 
3970—20x50 hip roof tent, 8-oz. white drill 
thn” sidewall of 6'%4-0z. drill; used 


Tent No, 

3971—20x50 hip roof Sent, 8-0z. white drill 
top, 10-ft. sidewall of 644-02. drill, blue 
trimmings; used 3 days, 

4112—20x60 hip roof tent, made of white 
drill, 10-ft. sidewall, blue trimmings, 
white curtain; used 5 days. 

4116—20x60 hip roof tent, 80z. white drill 


top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%-oz. drill, blue 
trimmings; brand new. 
4117—20x60 hip roof tent, 8-oz. white drill 
top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-oz. drill; brand 
new. 
4318—22x90 hip roof tent, 8-oz. khaki drill 
a Pia sernen rs 6%-oz. drill, water- 
roofed, red trimmings; used 2 months. 
4323—24x50 hip roof tent, 8-oz. red and white 
half widths, 9-ft. sidewall, 7-ft. pitch, 
waterproofed; used 3 days. 
4319—21x60 hip roof tent, 8-6z. white drill, 


¢-ft. pitch, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%%-oz. 
drill, red curtain; 1 season. 
4321—24x120 hip roof tent, 8-oz. khaki drill 


top, red trimmings, khaki curtain; used 
1 season. 
4306—25x75 hip roof tent, 8.oz, redeand white 
half widths, 10-ft. sidewall, blue trim- 
mings, red border; used 1 month. 
4310—25x100 hip roof tent, 8-oz. white drill 
top, 7-ft. pitch, 10-ft. wall of 6%%-oz. 
drill, red trimmings; used 1 week. 
4322—28x90 hip roof tent, 10-oz. D. F. khaki 
top, 10-ft. sidewall of 8-oz. khaki, red 
trimmings; used 1 week. 
4491—30x50 hip roof tent, 8-oz. white drill 
top, 10-ft. sidewall of 6%4-0z, drill, blue 
trimmings, white curtain; used 3 weeks. 
4486—30x60 hip roof tent, 8-oz. white drill 
top, 10-ft, sidewall; used 10 days. 
60° hi roof tent, 8-oz. white drill 
sidewall of 644-0z. drill; used 
10 days. 
§008—30x.0 hip 


roof tent, 10-0z. D. F. khaki 
top, 10-ft. 


sidewall of 8-oz. khaki, green 
trimmings, khaki border; used 3 weeks. 
30x60 hip roof tent, made of blue and 
white balf widths, 10-ft. sidewall, red 
trimmings, red border; used 1 week. 

60 hip roof tent, 8-oz. white dri!l 
top, 10-ft. wall 6%4-oz. green trimmings, 
green curtain; used 3 months. 

5007—30x58 hip roof tent, 12.9-0z. white arm 
duck top, 10-ft. sidewall of 64-oz. drill, 
white trimmings; used 5 days. 
5010—30x10 hip roof tent, made of 6%-02. 
10-ft. wall, 6142. white drill; 
season. 
b roof tent, made of 8-o0z, white 
drill, 7 sidewall, 644-0z. white drill; 
used one season. 
4678—40x100 bhp roof tent, 8-oz. white drill 
top, 10-ft. wall, 6%4-0z. white drill; used 


1 season. 
5903—40x125 hip roof tent, made of 6%-oz. 
white drill, 7-ft. wall, 64-0z. white drill; 
season. 
ROUND TOPS 


5912—40x60 ft. 40-ft. round top with 1 20-ft. 
middie piece; top & uz. double filled white, 
Ole hows leathered, bale-ring style, 10- 
t. side wall 64-0z. white; brand new. 
4646—40x60 ft. 40-ft. round top with 1 20-ft. 
middle piece; top 8-oz. khaki drill, roped 
every three widths, pole holes leathered, 
khaki trimmings; 10-ft. sidewall of 614- 
oz, khaki drill; used 10 days. 
§920—4x60 ft. 40-ft. round top with 1 20-ft. 
middle piece; top No. 10 white duck, 
roped every three widths, - pole holes 
leathered, white trimmings, 10-ft. side- 
wall of 6%4-0z. khaki; used 1 week. 
5918—40x60 ft. 40-ft. round top with 1 20-ft. 
middle piece; top 10-0z. water proofed 
olive drab, roped every three widths, pole 
holes leathered, olive drab trimmings, 10- 
ft. sidewall of 6%4-0z. khaki; used 


week, 

6918—40x60-ft. 40-ft. round top with 1 20-ft. 

* middle piece; top 10-oz khaki, roped every 
three widths, bale-ring style, pole holes 
lec‘hered, 10-ft. wall of 8-oz khaki; used 
1 week, 

5915—40xw0 ft. 40-ft. round top with 1 20-ft. 
middie piece; top 10-0z khaki, roped every 
three widths, bale-ring style, pole holes 
leathered, 10-ft wall of S-oz khaki; used 
1 week, 

§901—40x70 ft. 40-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece; top 8-oz white drill, roped 
every three widths, pole holes leathered, 
10-ft wall 6'4-0z. drill; used 5 days. 

5898—40xS0 ft. 40-ft. round top with 2 20-ft. 
middle pieces; top 8-oz white drill, bale- 


ring style, roped every three widths, 
pole holes leathered, S-in. extension 
eaves, 10-ft. sidewall of 61-0z. white 


drill; used 3 days. 
4669—40x110 ft. 40-ft. round top with 2 20-ft. 


middle pieces and 1 30-ft. middle piece;. 


top 8-oz. drill, roped every three widths, 


pole holes ‘eathered, bale-ring style, 10- 
ft. sidewall of 6'%-oz. drill; used 2 
weeks. 


5922—40x130 ft. 40-ft. round top with 3 20-ft. 
middie pieces and 1 30-ft. middle piece; 
top 10-oz. olive drab water proofed, roped 
every three widths, pole holes leathered, 
yush-pole style, olive drab trimmings, 
0-ft. sidewall 6%-oz khaki drill; used 


ek. 
round top; top only 8-oz. D. F. 

roped every three widths, pole 
holes leathered, 10-ft. wall, req trim- 
mings, repaired; good condition, 

6906—20-ft. middle piece only; top 10-oz. D. F. 
khaki, push-pole style, 1-piece 10-ft. wall; 
used 2 months. 

5894—30-ft. middle piece only, S8-oz. D. F. 
khaki, bale-ring style, side poles leath- 
ered off, roped every four widths and 
extra, khaki trimmings, 10-ft, sidewall; 
used 2 weeks. 

4831—50x70 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 20-ft. 
middle piece, 8-oz, Boyle’s drill top, bale- 
ring style, 10-in. extension eaves, 10-ft. 
sidewall of 614-0x, white drill; used 1 
season. 


Tent No, 


4832—50x70 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 20-ft. 
middle piece, 8-oz. white drill top, bale- 
ring style, roped every 4 widths and ex- 
tra, pole holes leathered off, 10-ft. wall 
6%-0z. white drill; used 1 week. 

4802—50x80 ft. 50-ft. Lund top with one 30-ft. 
middle piece, §-oz. drill top, roped every 
four widths and extra bale-ring style, pole 
holes leathered off, 10-ft. sidewall! of 6%4- 
oz, white drill; used 3 weeks. 

4811—50x80 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece, 8-0z, D. F. khaki top, side 
poles leathered, roped every 4 widths and 
extra, ted trimmings, 10-ft. sidewall of 
614-0z. khaki drill; used 1 month. 

x8Q ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 

middle piece; 10-0z. D. F. khaki top, pole 
holes leathered, roped every 4 widths and 
extra, khaki trimmings and curtain, 10- 
ft. wall 6%-0z. khaki dril; used 1 week. 

4824—50x80 ft. 50-ft. sound top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece; 8-0z. D. F. khaki top, pole 
holes leathered, roped every 4 widths and 
extra, khaki trimmings and curtain, 10- 
ft. wall 6%4-0z. khaki drill; used 1 week. 

4828—5° «<9 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece; 8-oz. Boyle’s drill top, 
bale-ring style, 10-in. extension eaves, 
Poie holes .eathered, 10-ft. wall 6'%-oz. 
w .ite drill; used 1 season. 

4834—50x80 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece; 8-0z. Boyle's drill top, bale- 
ring style, 10-in. extension eaves, pole 
holes leathered, 10-ft. wall 61-0z. white 
drill; used 1 season. 

6401—50xs0 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middie piece; bale-ring style, roped every 
4 widths and extra, 6%%-oz. drill top, 10- 
ft. sidewall of 64-0z. white drill; used 


1 season. 

§409—50x80 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece, 6%-oz. dzill top, bale-ring 
Style, extension eaves, pole holes leath- 
ered off, 10 ft. sidewall of 6%4-0z. white 
dril': used, in good condition. 

80 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece; 8-oz. duck top, roped every 
three widths, pole holes leathered, 10-ft 
sidewall of 6%4-0z. white drill; used, in 
2001 condition. 

80 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
Middle piece; 10-0z. olive drab top, roped 
every 4 widths and extra, olive drab 
trimmings, olive dsab curtain, 10-ft. wall 
of 6%-oz. drill; brand new. 

6418—S0x80 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece; &-oz. white dri:l top, roped 
every four widths and extra circus style, 
white trimmings and red braid; brand 
new. 

6420—50x80 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece; 8-0z. white drill top, 10-in. 
extension eaves, roped every 4 widths 
and extra, circus style, 10-ft. wall of 
614-0z. white drill; brand new. 

4782—50x80 ft. 50-ft. round top with 1 30-ft. 
middle piece; 8-oz, white drill top, bale- 
ring style, roped every four widths and 
extra, pole holes leathered, 10-ft. wall 
6%-0z. white drill: 20 days. 

4830—50x110 ft. 50-ft. round top with 2 30-ft. 
middle pieces; Boyle's 8-oz. drill top, 
bale ring style, 10-in. extension eaves, 
pole holes leathered off, 10-ft